Archive for August 2014

Why I Lay In Cow Poop To Take Dairy Cattle Show Pictures!

I cannot tell you the number of times that I have been asked, “Why do you lay down on the ground in the cow piss and poop to take pictures?”  It seems like after every show that I go to someone has taken a picture of me laying on the ground taking pictures.   I figured that in order to answer everyone’s questions and explain it in more detail, I would write an article about it.  Here goes.

When I first launched the Bullvine, we did not cover many shows, so we had to use professional side shots of the animals, instead of having pictures of the cows how they looked at the show.  Then, as we grew, we started attending more shows and decided that we would start covering them in more detail.  With that came the need for pictures.  For years, I have been a big fan of the photography work that Han Hopman has been doing for Holstein International.  (Read more: Han Hopman: Shooting Straight at Holstein International)

IMG_0683

He has taken some of the most iconic shots the show ring has ever seen.  Therefore, when we started to cover shows here at The Bullvine, we decided that we wanted to do more photos like Han. In order to achieve this, I first started by looking at Han work and seeing exactly how he was achieving such fantastic results.  I went out and purchased a $500 Canon camera and started to learn about photography.  One of the first things you learn is how to set up the camera to achieve the best results.  The camera settings can often be found in the META Data of each photograph.  So I found myself looking at Han’s photographs to see how he was setting up his camera.   This gave me great insight into the technical part of the process but certainly left much room to learn the artistic side.

Han Hopman always get’s his shot including this one of Eastside Lewisdale Goldwyn Missy & RF Goldwyn Hailey, Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion at Royal Winter Fair 2011.

While Han has been the first to employ this method in dairy cattle show ring photography, it has been a very popular technique in sports photography for many years.    Sports Illustrated, known worldwide for their excellent photos, has been using this technique since the 1970’s when Walter Ioos started doing this in order to differentiate his photographs.  It also turned out to be a great contributor to the early success of Sports Illustrated.

Walter Iooss' photos and collages of Michael Jordan featured in Sports Illustrated cover story celebrating the basketball icon's 50th birthday

Walter Iooss’ photos and collages of Michael Jordan featured in Sports Illustrated cover story celebrating the basketball icon’s 50th birthday

Having looked at what Han has been doing, and how Sports Illustrated used the power of differentiated photographs to grow to be the largest sports magazine in the world, I figured that we here at the Bullvine should do the same.  Over the past two years, I have been working at learning this technique and using it and other lessons to create differentiated photographs for us here at the Bullvine.

This is a low-angle shot with by Sports Illustrated's Peter Read Miller.  The camera resting on the ground.

This is a low-angle shot by Sports Illustrated’s Peter Read Miller. The camera resting on the ground.

First let’s clear things up.  I often have conversations with other show ring photographers about this very issue.  Many comment that they prefer to do event coverage photographs instead of cover shot photographs. For that reason, you will not find them lying on the ground to get the type of shots Han has made so popular.  In doing regular event coverage photography instead of trying to get 3-4 cover shots, you are more likely aiming to get 5-10 pictures per class so that viewers can get a good understanding of what each animal in the class looked like and so that the viewers of the photographs could make their own judgement call on each animal.  This means you don’t have as much time to set up for each photo, as you need to always be moving and getting the required shots. Add to that the fact that most publications are posting in real time to their website with placings, and here at the Bullvine we are also posting to Facebook and it can be very hard to stop and pose each photo.  The challenge with conventional event coverage photographs is that they are actually not really giving you a good representation of the animals.  That is because, when taking a regular event coverage photograph, you are shooting down on the animal (as most photographers are taller than 5 feet tall/60 inches).  This causes the level of distortion that is actually unbecoming to the animal.  Combine that with the fact that each camera and lens comes with a certain level of distortion and the pictures you see in typical event coverage are not as accurate as one would think.

Picture taken at standing height

Picture taken at standing height

Picture taken at about 30 inches off the ground.

Picture taken at about 30 inches off the ground.

The best viewing angle for the most accurate evaluation of an animal is to have a camera and lens approximately at the middle of the animal.  So, for a 60 inch cow, you should have the lens at about 30 inches off of the ground.   For most photographers, that means they would need to get at least down on one knee in order to get the best shot.  This is something that many do not choose to do.

Now Han has taken this technique to a whole new level, where he prefers to get down on the ground as low as possible.  This works great when shooting cattle from long distances as it makes the cows seem larger than life and provides very impressive cover shots.  However, as I have learned the hard way, in the past two years that I have been doing this, when these photos are taken at close range, you will find that the cows start to look quartered.  So there is certainly an art form to this photography.

Picture taken at about 30 inches of the ground

Picture taken at about 30 inches of the ground

Picture taken at ground level

Picture taken at ground level

One of the things I quickly learned is that not all North American shows have iconic environments to create these magnificent photographs.  Most dairy cattle shows in North America take place in dark arenas that don’t have very picturesque backgrounds, unlike those in Europe that have a custom environment which helps in producing outstanding photographic results.  The other challenge I learned is that we are typically shooting in low light, with high color cast so certainly shows are a tricky place to get great shots.  This is where I have employed and benefited from the help of others.   I started with staff photographers I work with in my main company who taught me the technical side.  It meant combining many conversations with the likes of Han and Randy Blodgett and two outstanding young photographers, Laurens Rutten and Bradly Cullen, as well as working through much trial and error.   I have slowly learned how to overcome these challenges.  Along with that came the understanding that I would have to invest in new equipment.  What started out as a $500 investment has now become a $30,000 investment complete with converting my garage into a studio in order to learn even more.  We have also now added a video studio for Bullvine TV (Read more: Introducing BullvineTV – The Dairy Breeding Industry Now Has Its Own Channel)

The lesson that I learned from many of the professional portrait photographers I have been fortunate to work with is that you need to develop your own style in order to stand out.  For me, that started out with wanting to catch those moments that breeders will never forget.  It meant being able to capture those moments when a cow is named grand at Expo, or when a father and son embrace after the Royal.  These are the moments that people will never forget, and pictures from these events have proven to be viral on social media.

One of the things I found as our pictures become more recognizable, is that more and more exhibitors where asking me if I had been able to get a picture of their animals.  In the beginning, since more of my photographs turned out somewhat less than good, it meant that I didn`t have time to get the shots all breeders were looking for.  However, more recently, as our experience has grown, we now strive to get a picture of every animal that enters the ring, and this is something we have been very close to achieving.  With the last Quebec Summer Show, we posted over 300 photographs from a show that had 148 animals.  (Read more: Expo provinciale de Montmagny) The interesting part is that instead of just doing event coverage like most publications are still doing, we are now able to produce shots that showoff the animals in the best possible way.  This has led to the Bullvine`s photos being the most used photos for ads and magazine covers in the dairy breeding industry.

RF GOLDWYN HAILY - EQM 2014-2000

The Bullvine Bottom Line

For me being able to be in the middle of the ring at Expo, the Royal or pretty much any other dairy cattle show is a real honor.  Exhibitors go to a great deal of effort 365 days a year, and I love being able to see up close just which  cows look good and which ones are not at their best on that day.  I feel that it`s my responsibility to the breeders that view our photographs to provide them with the best photos possible.  Also the reason I don`t charge breeders and exhibitors for the use of my photographs, as I have not paid for the right to take the photographs, how do I have the right to charge them?  In order to achieve this it not only means having the best equipment we can afford, but it also means being willing to get down on the ground  in order to  get the angle and perspective that captures the best possible moment.   Often this means laying in the piss and poop, as the angle that allows you to get to see the cows fore and rear udder may not be one that is in the cleanest spot in the show ring.  Sure I could move to a different angle, but then I would be cheating the breeders who go to so much effort to bring their animals to the show as well as those who like to view our pictures online.  It`s not about how pretty I look, but rather, what can I do to capture that animal looking her best! If that means laying in piss and poop, so be it. Besides how many true dairy farmers do you know that are afraid to get a little poop on them?

Check out more photographs in our gallery section 

 

 

 

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The Secret to Breeding the Dairy Cow of the Future…

As breeders we seldom give thought to the new milk products that consumers will want in the future. We assume that the composition of the milk we ship will not be different from what our cows currently produce. So we continue to select for the proportions of fats and proteins that have existed, wellalmost, forever. But our assumption of no composition change may not be correct. Let’s dig deeper.

Value Added Is the New Game

Some breeders have not been willing to accept the generic approach and average price for the milk they ship. To that end we see A2 milk taking market share in some countries, butter making a comeback (Read more: 12 Things You Need to Know About A2 Milk) and breed specific milks also catching market share. All in an effort to generate more revenue. It takes effort but the rewards appear to be well worth it.

The growth in milk’s market share of the food dollar will come from new specialty, health or pleasing to the palate products. Cold fluid milk in not currently the drink of choice in countries where the population growth will occur and it cannot be priced above other beverages.

To get new value added products will take something other than the milk our cows have been producing. This has been talked about for some time but until genomics came on the scene it had only been talk, as we had no way of linking genetics to products.  (Read more: The Dairy Industry – Past, Present and the Future,  “Got Milk” is becoming “Got More” and MILK MARKETING: How “Got Milk?” BECAME “Got Lost”)

Takes Shareholder Collaboration

For the vast majority of milk produced, the customers next in line for the milk producers sell, are the processors.  So to garner the maximum farm gate price, breeders will need to supply their processor with the milk that can be used to yield the value added product. But it’s not a simple thing.

Changing Milk Composition – Possible or Impossible?

What we are talking about is genetically changing for instance the protein composition of the milk cows produce. It is possible to feed cows a special diet or grow feeds on a certain soil type and relatively quickly alter composition to produce a specific product. It takes time to identify the desired parents, select for and then produce the cows that will produce the milk with unique composition.

A study currently underway in Scandinavia is collecting genomic data on individual cows and three breeds for the proportions of casein and whey proteins they produce. The Jerseys have higher concentrations of kappa casein known to be favourable for cheese making. The Swedish Red have a higher concentration of genes not as favourable to cheese making and the Holsteins have the highest relative composition of beta casein. However, within each breed, there are cows that have the ‘good’ genetic make-up, favorable for increased cheese production. The next steps of the study will be to actually quantify relationships and, once the results are available, refine selection for increased cheese production.  The good news is that producers wishing to receive increased returns for the milk they sell for cheese, will be able to develop herds that allow them to do that.

Can Breeders Get Started Now?

At present the tools to identify animals with the ‘good’ genes are not available. However that should not stop breeders wishing to develop bloodlines that will give them more cheese. Selecting for protein yield or CM$ (Cheese Merit Dollars) are good starting points. Instead of using NM$ (Net Merit Dollars) or FM$ (Fluid Merit Dollars) for sire or dam selection, breeders should use CM$. To maximize on-farm profit, selecting for CM$ is superior to using single trait selection and selecting for protein yield only. As more information relating genomic profiles with cheese production becomes available, breeders will be able to fine tune their selection.

Sires that Stand Out

At the present time genomic and daughter proven sires that stand out for CM$ include the following:

  • Mr Mogul Delta 1427 (203HO01468) CM$ 1115
  • Cogent Supershot (224HO02881) CM$ 1099
  • MR Shot Dozer (151HO00696) CM$ 1067
  • Roylane Socra Robust (7HO10524) CM$  921
  • Clear-Echo Nifty Twist (20HO14335) CM$  885
  • Kings-Ransom Erdman CRI (1HO09880)  CM$  856

The Bullvine Bottom Line

Breeders wishing to position themselves for having breeding stock and producing milk that is favourable to cheese production need to get started on using sires in their breeding program that have CM$ values over $1000 CM$ for genomic sires and $800 CM$ for daughter proven sires.

 

 

 

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Dairy Farm Management – Keep Calm and Carry a Smart Phone

If your mind is open to using digital technology in the barn, then you will agree that everything from the first PDA’s to the newest phones have forever changed our dairy management and communication capabilities. We have been amazed at the way phones seem to get cheaper, smaller and faster overnight.  Today, if we want it, we have the power to access information and organize in ways never before possible, using simpler, more effective tools like the smart phone.

“YES! THERE’S A SMART PHONE TO MATCH YOUR MANAGEMENT STYLE”

Regardless of the tool, the choice of using it or abusing it is ours. Lifestyle farmers may have a knee jerk reaction against technology in the barn.  But again, it’s a choice. Do you want faster resolution of health issues?  More focused work time? Real time updates to bookkeeping and record keeping rather than a once a week, month or year scramble. Regardless of your dairy farming philosophy, there will always be a large list of what needs to be dealt with. Even if you are comfortable with crisis management, your smartphone can ease the pressure when panic strikes.

“IF YOU ONLY DO ONE EXTRA THING, MAKE IT ONE OF THESE!”

Some people use all the power and functionality of their smartphone.  Others only use a few features.  No matter which side you are on, here are three that can make an enormous impact on how you manage.

Synchronize Your Calendars – One of the most powerful smartphone features is the ability to sync your information across multiple devices.  Synchronizing is not a new word in the dairy business, but using it to mean that all your electronic devices are intern-connected may be a new application. At the very least, ensure that your calendar is synched to your desktop, office and home PC. This will allow you to maintain one calendar instead of many separate ones.  The same is true for your contacts and to do items.

Use the Camera For MORE than Pictures – Beyond the picture of your calf, your John Deere or a “selfie,” your smartphone’s camera can be used to capture all kinds of information.  Whiteboards.  Notes. Reminders.  (Which pasture feeder is empty?)  Documents.  And more.  There are some great applications to help you manage your information pictures.

 “IF YOU’RE ALREADY SMARTER THAN YOUR PHONE, USE IT FOR MARKETING!”

You could be holding back from advertising the genetic successes that your dairy is producing because of your reluctance to take time to meet and coordinate with a photographer, magazine ad salesperson and your banker. That’s why you should consider YouTube videos that can be made with smartphone cameras and (with or without cheap props) can generate as much buzz as a very expensive ad campaign. The brilliance is that you can have it at the right time …. YOUR time! Instant visibility.  Ongoing market awareness.

“3 SHREWD MOVES FOR SMART PHONE DUMMIES”

There are pitfalls in using any tool.  The smartphone is no exception.

  • USE IT WISELY: You can let your smartphone help you or you can let it complicate your life and take up all your time.
  • SAFETY FIRST!  Don’t let your new buddy in your hand distract your attention from safe procedures that are necessary on every dairy operation.
  • DON’T INTRUDE: Don’t pressure your friends. You aren’t the only one who wants to manage their time. Don’t interfere with others.

“Keep Calm and Carry a Smart Phone”

A couple of weeks ago my 12-year-old grand-daughter was in charge of her sister – … when the family dog, while chewing on a stick, got a piece lodged between her gums.  Frantic and unable to close her mouth, the dog began shaking her head spraying spit at an alarming rate.  Thinking fast, my grand-girl grabbed her smart phone, took a quick video and forwarded it to her parents with accompanying questions about, “What should I do?”  Very quickly both mom and dad responded.  One was on the way home.  The other got on the phone and reassured that the situation was not life-threatening and would soon be resolved. Thank goodness for the bright girl and smart phone.

“Should You Hire or Fire Your Smart Phone?”

By using a smartphone, your farm team can start developing systems to work better, cover for each other and share project information. As each person knows more about the dairy’s priorities, they can understand and anticipate each other’s needs better. They can overlap responsibilities and the needs of the herd re well-covered. The smartphone camera, text and email capture issues and transforms the work day. Could you imagine just a couple of years ago that a manager could walk through the barn or pasture with a handheld smartphone, review cattle within sight, update information on heats and health, electronically send tasks to other staff, take photos, capture videos and voice memos, then have all that information be available in the office? Alternatively, could you have imagined just a few years ago that a dairy owner could actually leave the farm with the family and still be connected enough for consultation or updates? Many would not have thought that possible. It is now.

Always Connected. Office time is Blending with Barn Time

In the past, after chores were done, there was still the desk work. Today many dairy managers are taking a page from medical professionals who are accessing medical files in real cow side time. And speaking of professionals, vets, nutritionists and feed suppliers are increasingly willing to consult using digital devices. In the next few years, the fields of dairy health and management will become radically transformed.  Smartphones will pair with the Internet “cloud” to monitor individual health to the greater benefit of the cattle. “One-size-fits-all” cow care will become a thing of the past. It is not difficult to envision a day when an animal caregiver will have individual cow vital statistics and health data available in 24/7 on his or her smartphone.

“There are Other Digital Devices” ….. “Beyond the Smart Phone”

Increasingly available and/or developing quickly or on the horizon

  • Laboratory and “cow side” blood and milk testing for pregnancy and hormone status
  • Robotic milking units married to complex testing mechanisms that give real-time, current physiological data on the cow, including conductivity measurement to diagnose mastitis status, progesterone levels to aid breeding management and beta hydroxyl butyric acid (BHBA) quantification to reveal subclinical and clinical ketosis.
  • Individual cow monitoring technology via activity and rumination monitors.
  •  Economical, in-dwelling rumen boluses that collect and report rumen pH and other metabolic and physiological variables.

“Farming with Your Smartphone:  Get the most work done … and get a break too!

No matter where you are, eventually someone will talk about overcoming smartphone obsession.  They are concerned that we don’t interact or make real connections. We are devolving into a world with less face time.  They scream “It’s taking over work life balance!”   Well, in the first place, for dairy farmers work-life balance has never meant the same as it does for people with regular day where you are at work or not at work. Secondly, most dairy farmers have already chosen to blur the lines between work and life, and see balance as that wonderful situation where they get to do everything! Many time management organizers frown on this preference for multi-tasking – but they are not in the hurry up and wait world that happens daily on a dairy operation.  Around calving, loading, feed delivery or weather change on harvest or planting days you are literally at a standstill.  With a smart phone, your office is wherever you are. On those same days, when you are in “hell bent for leather” mode, being able to call for help, assign priorities or order in pizza for everybody seems like the best balancing act of all!

“HELLO!  ANYBODY THERE?”

Whether you’re an early adopter or the last one to follow the crowd, longevity in the dairy business means producing healthy milk at enough profit margin to meet the needs of you and your dependants.  Whether that’s three cows in a village in Africa or 300,000 on a dairy in Florida, it is the difference between the cost of production and the profit received that makes a dairy business sustainable or not. You can’t phone it in, but you can dial into modern methods and make continuous improvements.

THE BULLVINE BOTTOM LINE

Let’s face it.  We love our cows, but there’s always room for improvement. Are you operating at your most effective level? The next time you’re in the middle of a significant crisis or even a minor problem, ask yourself if a smartphone could have helped. If the answer is “Yes!”  then get smart and …..” Pick up the phone!!!”

 

 

 

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If You Know What’s Good for You… Eat Butter!

As dairy breeders, we pay special attention to the nutritional needs of our dairy herds.  As food consumers, we are also well aware of the responsibility of keeping ourselves and our families healthy.  It sometimes feels like being placed between a rock and a hard place. This is especially true when we read headlines that vilify farmers or the food we produce. Fortunately, in the case of butter, the pendulum is swinging in a more positive direction.

“Who Can You Believe?”

Over time butter has been blamed for everything harmful from obesity to heart disease. Dr. Ancel Keys – an American scientist who studied the influence of diet on health – believed saturated fats were the leading cause of heart disease because of their high caloric values and cholesterol levels. In 1961, the American Heart Association endorsed Keys’ hypothesis on fat, and the war against saturated fats was on. That same year, Keys was featured on the cover of Time magazine. Needless to say, margarine sales flourished while butter purchases plummeted.

“The Start and End of My Butter Blues!”

I am exactly the right age to remember the campaign against fat that came to the forefront in the 1960s.   I distinctly recall the difference that switching to margarine made in the taste of food. Butter had always been at the top of my list for improving bland tasting foods.   Gradually my grandparents and parents were won over to the idea of margarine as a healthier alternative to butter. I wish I had known that I could have pointed them to master chef Julia Child. It might have helped.  But maybe not. Sometimes the way we accept information is more mystery than recipe!

“Good Sense. Good Science.  Butter Brings Them Together Again!”

It has taken a long time, but hindsight regarding butter is becoming 20/20. Using the considerable data collected it is now possible to compare inverse relationships as the consumption of butter dropped and cancer and heart disease soared.  Certainly the rise in cancer and heart disease can no longer be blamed on high-saturated-fat butter. Indeed new research points to other contributing factors which need pro-active attention. Common sense needs to become more common.

The New Tune “Bring Butter Back” Is Hitting the Health Charts

Whenever we are in agreement with opinion reversals, we happily report that the change of tune. Today, after additional research and failures to curb obesity and type 2 diabetes, researchers are indeed singing a new tune. So-called heart healthy spreads, hydrogenated vegetable oils, margarine and shortening are under scrutiny. Excess dietary sugar creates insulin and leptin resistance, which can lead to obesity and inflamed arteries – which both raise the risk for a heart attack.  It’s not over-dramatic to declare that fighting obesity is a battle we all wage. But not all of us recognize the harm that one or two cans of soda can inflict. (Every American consumes on average 400 8 oz. servings of Coke products per year!) However, let’s stay focused on butter.

“Butter UP!” It’s High Time We Melted Those Butter Myths.”

Currently, both sides of the butter market — production and consumption — are strong.  In 2014 butter consumption in the US reached its 40 year peak of 5.6 pounds per capita, compared to 4.1 pounds in 1997. Meanwhile, margarine has fallen to a 70-year low. The butter boom, at least in part, has been attributed to a shift in consumer preferences away from processed foods and back toward natural foods.

“What you Don’t Know About Butter, Could Fill a Crock!”

It’s time to review and revise what you know about butter.

  • Almost as harmful as bad science is misleading advertising. Everyone who has a product to sell uses advertising to support purchases by targeted consumers. Imitation products made from vegetables, weeds, seeds or nuts are packaged like real dairy products and have the words “milk” or “dairy” in their names or advertising. They are a choice. But they are definitely not dairy even though advertisers keep churning things up.
  •  “Overall intake of dairy products was not associated with mortality. A possible beneficial association between intake of full-fat dairy and cardiovascular mortality needs further assessment and confirmation.” (European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2010) 64, 569–577; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2010.45;)
  • There are a lot of fat soluble vitamins in butter. This includes vitamins A, E and K2.
  • Butter contains short and medium chain fats which are metabolized differently from other fats. They lead to improved satiety and increased fat burning.
  • Butter is an excellent source of a fatty acid called Conjugated Linoleic Acid. This fatty acid has powerful effects on metabolism and is actually sold commercially as a weight loss supplement.
  • Conjugated Linoleic Acid has been shown to have anti-cancer properties as well as lowering body fat percentage in humans. However, some studies on CLA show no effect on body composition.
  • In 2013, the USDA began the process of banning trans fats from the American food supply.

“Upgrade to a Butter Vocabulary”

New terms that you may want to spread around are Vitamin K2 and Butyrate.

Vitamin K2. As previously mentioned, butter contains Vitamin K2. Vitamin K2 is somewhat rare in the modern diet. It is involved in calcium metabolism. Low intake of K2 has been associated with many serious diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and osteoporosis.

Butyrate: The 4-carbon fatty acid butyrate is created by bacteria in the colon when they are exposed to dietary fiber. Butter, is about 3-4% butyrate. In fact, butyr-ate derives its name from butter.

“Does Butter Make My Butt Look Bigger?”

Nutrition authorities often recommend that we choose low-fat dairy products. That way, we can get the calcium we need without all those “bad” fats and calories. Furthermore, despite the higher calorie content, eating high-fat dairy products is NOT associated with obesity. Modern research results point to high caloric intake and artificial ingredients as the more likely culprits impacting current health challenges.  In 2012, a study examined the effects of high-fat dairy consumption on obesity, cardiovascular disease and other metabolic disorders. They discovered that high-fat dairy did NOT increase risk of metabolic disease and was associated with a reduced risk of obesity.

“Always Consider Where It’s Coming From”

Making better choices is what makes life such a challenge and an opportunity.  Always consider where the information you’re buying into is coming from.  Try to avoid agendas of the information provider.  Obviously The Bullvine has a definitely pro-dairy viewpoint.  Having said that, the choice to accept, reject or react is up to you!  With instant access to news, we are bombarded with information 24/7.  We need to understand that headlines sometimes are aimed at sensationalism and are not necessarily scientific fact. Furthermore, when it comes to eating, you can have too much of a good thing. Just because something is good for you, it doesn’t follow that you should overindulge. But, having said that, there are some well-supported reasons for choosing butter.

“Butter is the Source for GOOD Fats.”

Healthy Saturated Fats The “war” against saturated fat was NOT based on real science. And speaking of good, there are good fats, and there are bad fats for us to learn to recognize. Saturated fats raise HDL (the good) cholesterol and change the LDL from small, dense (very bad) to Large LDL, which is benign.

Butter Does Your Heart Good

Recent studies suggest that there is no association all between saturated fat and cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately in our misguided enthusiasm we replaced healthy butter with unhealthy highly processed Trans fats. Trans fats are the bad guys and cause all sorts of diseases. In the Framingham heart study, they examined the effects of butter and margarine on cardiovascular disease.

Margarine significantly increased the risk of cardiovascular disease, while butter had no effect.

Another study revealed that high-fat dairy consumption reduced the risk of heart disease by a whopping 69%, most likely due to increased Vitamin K2 intake.

Conclusion: “You can’t Beat Butter.”

Well, actually you can beat butter but in terms of better eating, butter bashing has gone bye, bye!

In all the hype over good and bad, we sometimes are told or assume that if it tastes good it must be bad for you. It’s important to weigh the facts and make responsible choices.  Allowing butter to regain its place at the table, is a win-win-win for science, health and good taste.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

It`s time to bury the myth that butter is bad for you right along with  the accompanying threats, scare tactics and alarm bells.  The information is out there. It is based on real science and makes good sense and most importantly you can declare with confidence, “If you know what’s good for you …. eat butter!”

 

 

 

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Expo provinciale de Montmagny

top read 14 iconAugust 23, 2014
Judge: Rolland Dubois, Saint-Flavien, Qc.
148 Head / 74 Exhibitors

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Grand Champion – RF GOLDWYN HAILEY  – Best udder, Gen-Com Holstein Ltd
Reserve Grand Champion – BOULET GOLDWYN CHALOU, Best Bred & Owned, Ferme Boulet Inc., Pierre Boulet &Ferme Vilmer Inc
HM. Champion – Charwill Attic Marcy (Attic), Gen-Com Holstein Ltee, Qc

_MG_1276

Intermediate  Champion – Charwill Attic Marcy (Attic), Gen-Com Holstein Ltee, Qc
Reserve Inter. Campion – Petitclerc Gold Saltalamacchia (Goldwyn), Ferme Jean-Paul Petitclerc & Fils
Honorable Mention – Jacobs Goldwyn Lisamaree (Goldwyn) Ferme Jacobs

 

ROTALY GOLDWYN ALLEGRIA  Junior Champion ROCK HEBERT & NATHALIE DUMAIS

ROTALY GOLDWYN ALLEGRIA
Junior Champion
ROCK HEBERT & NATHALIE DUMAIS

Junior Champion -Rotaly Goldwyn Allegria (Goldwyn), Rock Hébert & Nathalie Hébert, Qc
Reserve Jr Champion -Lingle Goldchip Feline (Goldchip), Ferme Jen-Paul Petitclerc, Qc
Honorable Mention – Jacobs Goldwyn Aliza (Goldwyn), Ferme Jacobs Inc., Qc

Junior Calf

_MG_0786

1. LACFRASER G W ATWOOD SILVER , Best Bred & Owned, ROBERT LAROCHELLE
2. LACHANCIA ELABORATE TITANE , FERME KAMLAKE, STEPHANE TARDIF
3. PETITCLERC ATWOOD ATLAS , FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
4. JELAU MASCALESE JULIE , FERME KAMLAKE
5. JACOBS GOLDWYN KAHNE , FERME JACOBS INC
6. DENISTIER ATTWOOD LOTO , DENISTIER 24113185 QUEBEC INC
7. DUCHESNE ATWOOD LOTTY , FERME DUCHESNE HOLSTEIN
8. ROTALY BRAWLER HIDALGO , ROCK HEBERT & NATHALIE DUMAIS
9. CRASDALE WINDBROOK ADDICTION , CRASDALE FARMS, FERME BLONDIN
10. PETITCLERC GOLDWYN SWEETHEART, FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC

 Intermediate Calf

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1. ROTALY GOLDWYN ALLEGRIA . Best Bred & Owned, ROCK HEBERT & NATHALIE DUMAIS
2. BELFAST DOORMAN LOVESTRUCK , BELFAST HOLSTEIN ENR, MARY INN HOLSTEIN
3. CYRMO DOORMAN FANTA , JAMES ST. CYR
4. PETITCLERC GOLDSUN SALSA , FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
5. REPA JENNA DOORMAN , DONALD ROUX, MELANIE PARENTEAU, REJEAN PARENTEAU
6. MICHERET LORCY MASCALESE , FERME MICHERET INC
7. SICY AFTERSHOCK LEMONE , FERME YVON SICARD, JULIEN SICARD
8. GARAY AFTERSHOCK ZOUKI , DONALD DUBOIS, FERME JENDRO INC, JM VALLEY HOLSTEIN
9. REPA JENNLY DOORMAN , DONALD ROUX, MELANIE PARENTEAU, REJEAN PARENTEAU
10. MAROCH ATWOOD KABOOM, FERME JACOBS INC

 Senior Calf

_MG_0898

1. LINGLE GOLDCHIP FELINE-ET , FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
2. ROBROOK WINDBROOK BEAUTY , ISABELLE MORIN, PIERRE BOULET
3. PAULO LAUTHORITY LADYS NIGHT , Best Bred & Owned, FERME PAUL-AIME VERMETTE & FILS INC
4. ROTALY WINDBROOK OMBRE , ROCK HEBERT & NATHALIE DUMAIS
5. MARCON AFTERSHOCK CATHERINE , FERME H. MARCOUX & FILS INC
6. ROQUET CANDY NUMERO UNO, NICOLAS TEN HAVE
7. PETITCLERC GOLDWYN SALVATORE , FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
8. JACOBS ALEXANDER GOOD, FERME JACOBS INC
9. JACOBS GOLDWYN KARANA, JACOB DUEPPENGIESSER, FERME JACOBS INC
10. RICAGRI DEMPSEY PACE , FERME RICAGRI INC, JEAN-PHILIPPE CHAREST

Summer Yearling

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1. DESDEUXLACS FEVR MISS, Best Bred & Owned, LA FERME HUDON & FILS INC
2. PIERSTEIN WINDBROOK TIBOUT, PIERRE BOULET
3. MYNAVIA REGINALD ALEX, FERME MAGUY NORMANDIN INC, FERME MYNAVIA
4. JACOBS ATWOOD BIANNA, FERME JACOBS INC
5. VERTDOR ARTES TIFANY, FERME VERT D’OR INC
6. GEN-I-BEQ GOLDWYN LAURA, BELFAST HOLSTEIN ENR, JEREMY BAZAILLACQ
7. JACOBS GOLD CHIP BIO, FERME JACOBS INC
8. JACOBS ALEXANDER VALANO , FERME JACOBS INC
9. BELFAST FEVER TALLY , BELFAST HOLSTEIN ENR
10. BERGEROY WINDBROOK ROXETTI , BERGEROY HOLSTEIN INC, JOSIANNE BOUCHARD

Junior Yearling

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1. JACOBS GOLDWYN ALIZA, Best Bred & Owned, FERME JACOBS INC
2. DENISTIER MAGIC DAY , DENISTIER 24113185 QUEBEC INC
3. BELFAST WINDBROOK SYRYUS , BELFAST HOLSTEIN ENR
4. SICY BALLET ATWOOD , FERME YVON SICARD, GHYSLAIN DEMERS

Winter Yearling

_MG_0948

1. KAROBERT STANLEY CUP ALLYSTAR, Best Bred & Owned, ALAIN ROBERT & CAROLINE BRETON
2. JACOBS ALEXANDER EDDY, FERME JACOBS INC
3. COTOPIERRE DEMPSEY RENNA, FERME ST. PIERRE & FILS ENR
4. VERTDOR LAUTHORITY MATRIX , FERME VERT D’OR INC
5. PETITCLERC ALEXANDER ACCESS , FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
6. ERNEST-ANTHONY SCP ANGELICA , FERME BLONDIN, FERME FORTALE HOLSTEIN INC

Senior Yearling

_MG_0963

 

1. GOLDENFLO GOLDCHIP KENTUCKY, CABANHA DMG, JEAN-PHILIPPE CHAREST, MACBEATH FARMS LTD, MV GENETICA
2. TY-D ALEXANDER TIA MARIA , FERME JACOBS INC

Jr Herd

1. Jacobs
2. Rotaly

Premier Breeder & Exhibitor

1. Jacobs
2. Petitclerc
3. Rotaly

 Senior Yearling in Milk

_MG_1058

1. PETITCLERC GOLD SALTALAMACCHIA – Best udder Best Bred & Owned, FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
2. JACOBS SID BAMBA , FERME JACOBS INC, MARTIN VEILLEUX
3. BERNADALE GOLDWYN ABILITY , FERME BLONDIN
4. JACOBS ALEXANDER EVERYTHING , FERME JACOBS INC
5. PIERSTEIN SID CAM , PIERRE BOULET
6. BERTHELY DEMPSEY MYLOVE , FERME BERTHELY INC
7. GARAY ALEXANDER ALL BLACK, FERME FORTALE HOLSTEIN INC, FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
8. JACOBS SID BRIE , FERME JACOBS INC

Junior 2 Year Olds

_MG_1096

1. OUTAUAIS SID HAILEY, FERME BLONDIN
2. ROSEVINE DEMPSEY WOOPIE , FERME BLONDIN
3. MABEL REGINALD LITINOU, Best Bred & Owned, FERME MAGUY NORMANDIN INC
4. GRILLSDALE WORKOUT DUNDEE, GEN-COM HOLSTEIN LTE
5. JACOBS SID GLORY, FERME JACOBS INC, PINEHAVEN FARM
6. DUHAMEL WINDBROOK DOWNY, FERME MAROCH & FILS INC
7. EXTONDALE SID JAM, FERME BLONDIN
8. JACOBS GOLDWYN ALEAH , FERME JACOBS INC
10. BOULET SID EMILY, FERME BOULET INC

Senior 2 Year Old

_MG_1108

1. PETITCLERC GOLDWYN ANOUK, Best Bred & Owned, FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
2. MASSICO WINBROOK CHARLY – Best udder, FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
3. MICHERET AMAZONE WINDBROOK, FERME MICHERET INC
4. HARMILL KROWN REANN , PIERRE BOULET
5. GEN-COM SID LOLLY TOP , FERME JOCELYN COTE INC
6. JACOBS GOLDWYN ALYSON , FERME JACOBS INC
7. JACOBS FEVER CAEL, FERME JACOBS INC
8. PETITCLERC GOLDWYN SILVER, FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
9. BERGEROY SID AMBELIA, BERGEROY HOLSTEIN INC
10. JACOBS GOLDWYN BAHIA, FERME JACOBS INC

Junior 3 Year Old

_MG_1209

1. BERGEROY SEAVER CARTER – Best udder Best Bred & Owned, BERGEROY HOLSTEIN INC
2. CRASDALE ATWOOD ENERTIA, FERME YVON SICARD
3. MARCON GOLDWYN CASILA, FERME BOULET INC, FERME H. MARCOUX & FILS INC
4. JACOBS ATWOOD VEDETTE, FERME JACOBS INC
5. COTOPIERRE FEVER FLOEE, FERME ST. PIERRE & FILS ENR
6. BLONDIN GOLDWYN KALLY, FERME BLONDIN
7. LEXIS V V MAGNETISM GALLEY, FRIZZELLS VALLEYVILLE FARM INC, LEXIS HOLSTEINS, PIERRE BOULET
8. PETITCLERC SEAVER DELIMA, FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
9. PIERSTEIN ALEXANDER OOH LA LA, PIERRE BOULET
10. GILLY JORDAN MAYA, FERME GILLY

Senior 3 Year Old

_MG_1244

1. CHARWILL ATTIC MARCY – Best udder, GEN-COM HOLSTEIN LTEE
2. JACOBS GOLDWYN LISAMAREE, Best Bred & Owned, FERME JACOBS INC
3. MYSTIQUE GOLDWYN BOREALE, FERME BLONDIN
4. SICY ELLA AMAZING, FERME YVON SICARD, PIERRE BOULET
5. HODGLYNN DYNASTY LICORICE, GEN-COM HOLSTEIN LTEE
6. BONACCUEIL FELIA GOLDWYN, A. & R. BOULET INC
7. PETITCLERC ALEXANDER AMYCALE, FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
8. MAROCH SHOTTLE MAGNA, FERME MAROCH & FILS INC

4 Year Olds

_MG_1310

1. JACOBS ATWOOD MELODY – Best udder Best Bred & Owned, FERME JACOBS INC
2. BLONDIN ALEXANDER ARMANA, FERME JACOBS INC
3. COTOPIERRE GOLDWYN ELOISE, FERME ST. PIERRE & FILS ENR
4. BURN DENISON ALLISON. FERME KAMLAKE, LA FERME A.B.G. BLACKBURN INC
5. TODDSDALE-I JASPER JODIE, FERME C.P.R. GRENON INC
6. BOULET PRONTO CHALE, FERME BOULET INC
7. PETITCLERC GOLDWYN VERTICA, FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC

5 Year Olds

_MG_1368

1. COBEQUID GOLDWYN LENO – Best udder, Yvon Sicard,G.Demers,Butz-Hill Holstein, P. Boulet
2. MS PRIDE GOLD INVITE 761-ET, Blondin & Crasdale & Ponderosa
3. CORADIE GOLDWYN MIGANE, Ferme Laitière Rayon D’or Inc.
4. JACOBS MINISTER AIMA, Best Bred & Owned, Ferme Jacobs Inc.
5. BOULET GOLDWYN CHALY ROSE, Ferme Boulet Inc., Pierre Boulet & Ferme Arthur La
6. MORSAN GOLD TAFFY, Ferme Cerpolait
7. KARONA GOLDWYN MALIBU, Ferme Beldavid Inc.
8. MACPES GOLDWYN LYTHRUM, Martin, Marcel
9. ASHLYN GOLDWYN STYLE, Ferme A. R. Boulet Inc.
10. BACHLEE TALENT MIA, Joel Lepage

Mature Cow

_MG_1400

1. RF GOLDWYN HAILEY  – Best udder, Gen-Com Holstein Ltd
2. BOULET GOLDWYN CHALOU, Best Bred & Owned, Ferme Boulet Inc., Pierre Boulet &Ferme Vilmer Inc
3. EBYHOLME GOLDWYN MELLOW, Ferme A. R. Boulet Inc.
4. CLAYNOOK KAREN GOLDWYN, Joel Lepage

Production Cow Class

_MG_1420

1. ROGGUA DUNDEE EVELYNE – Best udder, Yvon Sicard,G.Demers,Butz-Hill Holstein, P. Boulet
2. MEADOW GREEN JEANY OUTSIDE, Ferme Blondin
3. WENDON GOLDWYN ALLIE, Ferme Laitière Rayon D’or Inc.
4. BONACCUEIL GOLDWYN ROSALIND, Best Bred & Owned, Ferme A. R. Boulet Inc.

Premier Breeder
1. FERME JACOBS INC (JACOBS)
2. FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC (PETITCLERC)
3. FERME BOULET INC (BOULET)

Premier Exhibitor
1. FERME JACOBS INC
2. FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC
3. FERME BLONDIN

Premier Sire
1. BRAEDALE GOLDWYN
2. PINE-TREE SID-ET
3. MAPLE-DOWNS-I G W ATWOOD

Expo provinciale de Montmagny Rouge et Blanc

August 22, 2014
Judge: Vincent Landry, Cookshire, Qc.

_MG_0672

Grand Champion – Blondin Mr Burns Laurence (Mr Burns), Carlos I Herrera, Ferme Blondin, Qc
Reserve Grand Champion- Blondin Artie Saphyr (Artie), Ferme Blondin
Honorable Mention – Fortale Barbwire Pomlie (Barwire), Desnette Holstein & Ferme Fortale Holstein

_MG_0561

Junior Champion- Sejane Camden Vania (Camden), Ferme Sejane Holstein & Michel Larrivee, Qc
Reserve Junior Champion – Bergeroy Reality Sofiana (Reality), Bergeroy Holstein inc, Qc
Honorable Mention – Larochelle Reality Sofija (Reality), Ferme Larochelle senc & Isabelle Morin, Qc

 

Junior Calf (7)

_MG_0448

1. Larochelle Artie Landy (Artie) ,Ferme Larochelle SENC, Qc
2. Cotopierre Sympatico Fiola Red (Sympatico), Ferme ST-Pierre er Fils, Qc
3. Jolibois Fidelity Aussie (Apple Imp), Ferme Rolandale enr, Qc
4. Jolibois Absolute Fantsay (Absolute), Ferme Rolandle Enr, Qc
5. Pierstein Apple Jacuzzi (Apple Imp), Kyle Demmer, Kyle Natzke, Pierre Boulet, Qc

Intermediate Calf (6)

_MG_0486

1. Larochelle Reality Sofija (Reality), Ferme Larochelle SENC & Isbelle Morin, Qc
2. Pierstein Ladd P Tempete (Ladd P), Pierre Boulet, Qc
3. Caniel Spagetti Chipper (Chipper), Ferme Drouin & Fils
4. Micheret Velra Brewin Red (Brewin), Ferme Micheret, Qc
5. Pierstein Ladd P Janik (Ladd P), Diamond Hill Farms & Pierre Boulet, Qc

Senior Calf (4)

_MG_0501

1. Larochelle Reality Sofiona (Reaity), Ferme Larochelle senc, Qc
2. Micheret Bellisa Aikman Red (Aikman), Ferme Micheret enr, Qc
3. Micheret Bellicima Aikman Red (Aikman), Ferme Micheret enr, Qc
4. Lookout Fancy (Redliner), Ferme Intense enr & Nelson Ziehlsdorff, Qc

Summer Yrlg (3)

_MG_0512

1. Bergeroy Reality Sofiana (Reality), Bergeroy Holstein inc, Qc
2. Quecy Picolo Dorena (Picolo), Jacques Roy, Qc
3. Larochelle Reality Sofiana (Reality), Ferme Larochelle senc, Qc

Junior Yrlg (2) 

_MG_0515

1. Roylier Ladd Lizianne (Ladd-P), Ferme Siljack inc., Jocelyn Roy & Sébastein Moffet, Qc
2. Au Vent Lili (Colt P), Ferme Dugouffre senc,Qc

Intermediate Yrlg (3)

_MG_0533
1. Sejane Camden Vania (Camden), Ferme Sejane Holstein & Michel Larrivee, Qc
2. Pierstein Colt Gold (Colt-P), Ferme Larochelle senc, Instinct Holstein & Isabelle Morin, Qc
3. Vioris Paisley (Red Rock), Ferme Larochelle Senc, Qc

Senior Yearling (3)

_MG_0543

1 . JOLIBOIS FLORA CONTENDER , Propriété élevée, FERME ROLANDALE ENR
2. JOLIBOIS FLORE CONTENDER , FERME ROLANDALE ENR
3. JOLIBOIS FLORALIE CONTENDER , FERME ROLANDALE ENR

Junior Breeder

1. FERME ROLANDALE ENR (JOLIBOIS)
2. FERME LAROCHELLE S.E.N.C (LAROCHELLE)
3. PIERRE BOULET (PIERSTEIN)

Junior Exhibitor

1. FERME ROLANDALE ENR
2. FERME LAROCHELLE S.E.N.C
3. FERME MICHERET INC

Premier Junior Sire

1. HURTGEN-VUE REALITY-RED
2. PATIENCE SHOWLINE CONTENDER
3. TIGER-LILY LADD P-RED-ET

Junior 2 Year Old

_MG_0583

 

1. FORTALE BARBWIRE POMLIE,  Best udder Best Bred & Owned, DESNETTE HOLSTEIN, FERME FORTALE HOLSTEIN INC
2. MAXILE ABSOLUTE ROUDY , FERME KAMLAKE, FERME MAXI ENR

Senior 2 Year Old

_MG_0626

1. WILLOW-MARSH SUNDANCE-RED – Best udder, FERME BLONDIN
2. PIERSTEIN REDMAN JAVA , Best Bred & Owned, DIAMOND HILL FARMS, PIERRE BOULET
3. JOLIBOIS CONTENDER FEATHER RED , FERME ROLANDALE ENR
4. LOASIS FRONTRUNNER LOVER , FERME LOASIS ENR

Junior 3 Year Old

_MG_0633

1. BLONDIN ARTIE SAPHYR – Best udder Best Bred & Owned, FERME BLONDIN

Senior 3 Year Old

_MG_0642

1. BELLE CHASSE BREAKER TOMATE  – Best udder Best Bred & Owned, GERARD LALIBERTE & FILS
2. BELLE CHASSE SHIRAZ THANK YOU , GERARD LALIBERTE & FILS

5 Year old

_MG_0645

1. RUTI M BURNS SAVANA  – Best udder, NICOLAS LAFLAMME

Mature Cow

_MG_0650

1. BLONDIN MR BURNS LAURENCE – Best udder Best Bred & Owned, CARLOS I HERRERA, FERME BLONDIN

Breeder Banner

1. FERME ROLANDALE ENR (JOLIBOIS)
2. PIERRE BOULET (PIERSTEIN)
3. FERME LAROCHELLE S.E.N.C (LAROCHELLE)

Banner Exhibitor

1. FERME ROLANDALE ENR
2. FERME LAROCHELLE S.E.N.C
3. FERME BLONDIN

Premier Sire

1. PATIENCE SHOWLINE CONTENDER
2. DUDOC MR BURNS
3. HURTGEN-VUE REALITY-RED

Genomic Testing – Are You Missing Out?

When The Bullvine mentions genomic testing to production oriented breeders, we frequently get the reaction “Oh, that’s just for herds that sell high priced animals. I focus on running a profitable milking operation. I don’t need to spend money on testing my animals.” Well, in fact, that is not an accurate assessment of the benefits available from using this tool at the present time. If you are among those not using genomics, Stop Procrastinating! It is a tool that everyone breeding their herd to improve it genetically should not be without.

Only Very Moderate Uptake – So Far

Currently, there is an 8% uptake of genomic testing of all Holstein heifer calves. The total is less in other breeds. We have barely scratched the surface.  Half a century ago, official milk recording was at the same low level. Today it is recognized as a much-needed toll both on-farm and in the national herd. Obviously the question that breeders need answers to is ‘How will I benefit from genomic testing all my heifer calves?

Known Benefits

Much has been written about benefits and opportunities available to breeders who are submitting samples for DNA testing. Those range from selecting the best mates for your females, … to parentage verification, … to how to manage your heifer herd, … to deciding which heifers to breed and which ones to cull or implant, … to polled or not polled, …to finding the genetic outlier of an individual mating, …to an aid in marketing heifers in sales.

Just recently Holstein USA and Zetas launched an exciting service called Enlight. Breeders that submit their samples to Zoetis can through Holstein USA’s website summarize and analyze their heifers for their genetic qualities. This is the first, and no doubt other breeds will establish similar services in the future. Breeding to get the genetics that work best for you and then managing them in the best way possible is definitely important.

At the industry level, genomic testing has also proven beneficial. Alta Genetics, a few years ago, working with large herds in the USA, parentage verified all young sire daughters. It was a significant step forward in accuracy of sire proofs so they could guarantee their product to their customers. Companies like Zoetis and Neogen initiated genomic testing services so they could help producers and also as complementary to their other products. A.I companies have been able to restrict their young sires sampled to only top genomically evaluated young sires, thereby saving millions for themselves by not sampling the bottom enders and millions for breeders that did not have to raise, calve in and milk the lower genetic merit daughters of the bottom end bulls. All of these benefits are leading to cost savings in the hundreds of millions of dollars.

However six years into using genomics we are only starting to reap the rewards.

Genomics Will Make the Future Brighter

Breeders often mention that they want sires to use and females in their herd that are superior to what is available today for traits that are difficult or impossible to measure. Here are some thoughts and facts that may help breeders to decide to use genomic testing so they can have animals that are even more profitable than their herd is today. It does however require that genomic testing becomes routine (Read more: Why 84% of Dairy Breeders Will Soon Be Using Genomic Sires!).

Heifers:

Investigation, at the farm level, is being done in beef heifers on growth rates, diets tailored to genotype, immunity to common diseases and age at first estrus. The results of those studies will be able to be applied to dairy heifers since little similar research is being conducted for dairy heifers. Already breeders can test for the genetically inferior heifers, so they do not need to be raised. Up to $500 per heifer in rearing cost could be saved by having the retained heifers calving by 22 months of age.  Remember that it is age at first estrus that is important, for which we have very limited farm data. First breeding depends on a breeding actually occurring.  With heifers genotyped and selected for first estrus significant savings will be possible.

Feed Efficiency:

Two major research projects, one in USA and The Netherlands and one in Australia and New Zealand, will identify the cows that are genetically more efficient at converting their feed to milk. Within a couple of years, we can expect to see reports relating genomic information to feed efficiency.  This type of research is costly and not currently practical at the farm level, but using research herds this investigation is well underway. Reducing feed costs by 5-10% through genetic selection would result in many millions in savings. That is likely to be crucial to the dairy cattle breeding industry as dairy competes to feed a hungry world. (Read more: Feed Efficiency: The Money Saver and 15 Strength Sires That Will Still Fit In Your Stalls)

Inbreeding:

CDCB already makes available the inbreeding level of genomically tested animals based on their genomic results. No doubt further research results will provide numbers associated with inbreeding. Think about it. In the past the inbreeding level for two full sisters, based on pedigree, has been considered the same. However, by using their genomic profiles the level of inbreeding can be much more accurately known for each sister. A recent report from CDN, for the time period 2010 to 2013, shows that inbreeding rates are increasing not decreasing. Even though breeders are aware that inbreeding is a negative to future profit, they continue using fewer sire lines. More in-depth study of presence or absence of genes that negatively affect the viability of our cattle take time. Why do we always expect someone else to take responsibility for the level and rates of inbreeding? (Read more: 6 Steps to Understanding & Managing Inbreeding in Your Herd and Stop Talking About Inbreeding…)

Disease Resistance:

The list is long on diseases that breeders want their animals to be resistant to. Many research projects are underway to relate the genotype to particular types of mastitis, respiratory diseases, wasting diseases and even production limiting diseases like milk fever. CDN and Canadian milk recording agencies have been capturing field data for a number of years now on eight production limiting diseases. In time, the relationships between genetic lines and these diseases will be better-known. So that selection can be carried out to avoid problem bloodlines. When more animals are genomically tested, and bloodlines prone to diseases are identified great steps forward will be able to be made. It takes considerably more than 8% of the population genomically tested to move breeding for disease resistance to reality. (Read more:  Genomics – Opportunity is Knocking)

Reproduction:

Failure to get animals to show good heats, to produce good oocytes and conceive when bred is the leading frustration on most dairy farms. The role that genetics plays in that frustration is now receiving attention by many researchers and organizations. In the past, the capturing of useful data to do genetic analysis relative to reproduction has been a significant problem. The relating of genomic results to reproduction holds out considerable hope. Early embryonic death, haplotypes that negatively impact reproduction, genetic difference between animals for cystic ovaries and many more are all areas of concern for breeders. Once again both genomic and on-farm data are needed to move forward. (Read more: 10 things dairies with great reproduction do right and Are Your Genetics Wasting Feed and Labor?)

Misconception:

I hear breeders say “Genomic indexes are just like production indexes.” However, that is not so. There are genomic indexes for production traits, conformation traits and management traits. Genomics is a dynamic science. It is best if breeders know not only the genomic values for the animals currently in their herds but also their ancestors. To build the genomic history for a herd necessitates that testing start as soon as possible. Genomics is a tool every breeder will benefit from using no matter what their selection goals are. (Read more: Better Decision Making by Using Technology and FACT VS. FANTASY: A Realistic Approach to Sire Selection)

In Another World

Outside the world of dairy cattle but totally related to DNA analysis, there is a study just under way in the United Kingdom, where 100,000 people with cancer or rare diseases are being genotyped to better understand people’s ability to avoid or resist cancer and disease. One of the terms used in the news release was that before there was DNA profiling this work would not have been possible. Relating that back to dairy cattle, if we do not have the DNA information for animals we will be limited in our ability to eliminate deleterious genes from our cattle.

Will Genomic Testing Pay?

The question for breeders appears to have been one of cost – benefit. “What will I get for the fifty dollar cost of doing a low-density test?”  The fact is that, to date, milk producers have not taken the opportunity for more rapid genetic advancement by testing all their heifers. However, the tide is about to change. With new information coming out almost weekly on how the genetic (aka genomic) make-up of an animal relates to profitability, breeders without genomic information on their herd will not be in a position to know which sires to use or how to manage or feed their animals. Genomic testing needs to be viewed as an investment rather than a cost. Invest $50 shortly after birth to save hundreds over the cow’s lifetime.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

Every journey requires that a first step be taken. The first step is that breeders submit samples for DNA analysis. Every breeder will benefit by knowing the genomics of their herd. No doubt the cost of testing will come down as more breeders participate.  Future success in dairying will require genomic testing, just as current success depends on capturing and using performance information. Are you prepared for using genomic information to assist in creating your future success in dairying?


The Dairy Breeders No BS Guide to Genomics

 

Not sure what all this hype about genomics is all about?

Want to learn what it is and what it means to your breeding program?

Download this free guide.

 

 

 

Holstein vs. Jersey – What Color of Dairy Breed Is the Real Money Maker?

A recent headline in Hoard’s Dairyman proclaimed “Brown is the Color of Money” and that’s all it took for “The Hunt Family Feud” to take off over phone, email and Facebook.  With roots in Holsteins, dairy nutrition and dairy genetics, the perfect ingredients were present for arguments, controversy and loud proclamations of bull* –all of which are highly esteemed in the Hunt family.

Can you Measure the Difference?

This debate is fueled by a lot of things but every good argument needs actual facts. Inputs of feed, facility, equipment and staff may be impacted by the size differential between Holsteins and Jerseys.  Smaller animals may correspondingly require less inputs.  We have to recognize that “may” is the operative word here because there are different variables depending on each particular dairy operation.

One size variable that can’t be ignored is that dairy herd size is growing.  Faced with this scenario, there may be good reasons for choosing one breed over another or for having a combination of breeds on a single operation. Choice might be influenced by:

  • Specific markets
  • Relative health issues between breeds
  • Calving ease
  • Initial investment and sources for replacements

Many questions have to be answered, before a winner can be named.

Which Breed Fits the Facilities?

For those working in barns that were built twenty or more years ago where stalls are smaller, Jerseys may be a better fit.   As well new dairy operators who are renting such facilities could find that Jerseys would operate better in those smaller stalls.  Bedding packs also are another way to put minimal effort and expense into rented facilities. Jersey’s work well on packs. If there is a drawback, it could be that it may take more stalls to produce the same volume of milk.  However, if the Jerseys are high volume for %F and %P, then the pounds of fat+protein produced per day may be the same whether it’s Holsteins or Jersey.

 Which Breed Eats the Most?

Scientific examples abound regarding “efficiency” because of the Jersey’s smaller size. Let’s briefly consider human size relating to efficiency. “Is the size two female more efficient than her size 18 cousin. What are they producing?  Food for a party?  Or are you measuring food consumed? Not relevant.  Well – what about groceries consumed? Or children produced?  Getting warmer.  But there are still too many variables to make a choice based on efficiency related to size alone. However, back to choosing the most efficient dairy breed to feed. It isn’t only about quantity of feed consumed per cow per day. The calculation should refer to the net dollars per day for the herd. When calculating returns minus feed costs, Jerseys can be competitive. (Read more: Feed Efficiency: The Money Saver)

Which Breed Has Better Genetics and Genomics?

Jerseys are not just for show oriented breeders.  Milk production focused herds are using Jerseys.

Genetically Jerseys differ from Holsteins in that SCSs are higher, and the Median Suspensory Ligament (cleft) may not be as defined. Their reproduction is much superior.  Jersey dropped bull calves are much less in demand. Dollar value is low.  Using sexed semen for the top of the herd and beef semen on the bottom half gives a revenue source because crossbred dropped calves are in demand. (Read more: SEXED SEMEN – At Your Service!) Jerseys have genomic indexes as well. Genomics may have been a little slower to be adopted than in Holsteins but just wait Jerseys will catch up. Or so the argument goes. (Read more: Dairy Cattle Genomics)

Which Breed will Save Time?

Jerseys are the Queens when it comes to reproduction in dairy cattle, boasting easier calving, better conception rates and fewer inseminations. All of these have an impact on less vet time required for checking or treating as well as staff time and effort daily and annually. Easier calving for Jersey’s impacts that there will be fewer calf losses at birth and most likely more calves getting off to a better start. Superior reproduction can allow for less time off in the dry cow pen or less time milking at lower levels during a lifetime. (Read more: Artificial Insemination – Is Doing It Yourself Really Saving You Money?)  Every manager knows that staff and cows need time off. Unnecessary time off on the cow’s part means less than optimum returns over a cow’s lifetime. Jersey heifers reach puberty at a younger age.  This means age at first calving can be earlier, thus saving on rearing costs.

Which breed sells more milk? More live sales?

In the US, Jerseys are about 10% of the population. There has been steady growth in the number of Jersey herds in the U.S., particularly among large dairy owners in the West. The way breeders market and which markets they send their milk to is essential in areas where cheese and butter sales (which are at the highest relative level in twenty years) can greatly influence which breed you choose to work with.  Owners are producing milk that their processors desire.  In fact, the processor is the breeders’ customer not the end consumers.  With eat local food movements the world over being emphasized, Jerseys may fit better than other breeds in some situations. The recent popularity of Jerseys has resulted in the fact that sales of breeding stock have been good as well,

It’s All About the Numbers. Are they In the Red or In the Black?

When you want to win the argument over which breed is the most profitable it all comes down to the actual data, you are analyzing.  The reason the debate goes on is because there isn’t a source for reliable data comparing Jerseys and Holsteins.  And so we come back to the initial article which triggered these questions which reported a comparison that exists through financial reports of Ganske, Mulder & Co. LLC, the largest dairy accounting firm in the U.S., They prepared reports summarizing all of its clients as a group and also does a separate summary for its Jersey clients. “It is perhaps the only such set of Jersey financial data that exists” reports the article that goes on to present statistics and the following summation. “Jerseys did make less milk per day than did all of the firm’s clients. But Jersey herds had much higher protein and fat tests, which resulted in significantly higher milk price per hundredweight. As a result, Jersey herds’ bottom line was much bigger – they made 45.7 percent more net profit per head.

NAMESaleLotGLPI
OCONNORS PLANET LUCIAGenetics By Design13823
STE ODILE MOON MODEL AMALUNAGPS163798
OCONNORS LIVING THE DREAMGenetics By Design143755
MAPEL WOOD LAST DANCEGenetics By Design33710
MAPEL WOOD SNOWMAN LEXUSGenetics By Design43673
OCONNORS BOULDER LUNAGenetics By Design63537
MAPEL WOOD BOULDER LIMERICKGenetics By Design73537
OCONNORS LAST HOPEGenetics By Design23534
BENNER FORK JANARDANGPS13493
OCONNORS EPIC LAST CHANCEGenetics By Design83465
OCD MOGUL FUZZY NAVELSale of Stars53460
GEN-I-BEQ LEXOR PLAGESale of Stars453398
VELTHUIS SG LAVAMAN ENVYSale of Stars463372
MARBRI UNO BEAUTYGPS113328
MAPEL WOOD M O M LUCYGenetics By Design123299
ROCKYMOUNTAIN LEXOR EDENGPS323289
WELCOME-TEL ECOYNE ABBIESale of Stars123286
ZIMMER WENDON UNO CAMISale of Stars353268
OCONNORS SNOWMAN LEXIEGenetics By Design53255
BOLDI V S G EPIC ASTERSale of Stars73240

So What Color of Dairy Breed Is the Money Maker?

Jersey herds produced 48 pounds of fat and protein where all herds produced 5.0 pounds of fat and protein. This is not significantly different. But on any given day, on any particular dairy operation, the numbers can be rallied to support the choice that is dearest to the heart of owner-operators.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

In the end, your particular passion is what it all boils down to. When it comes to the choice of Black and White, Brown, or “green”, the only thing you can know for sure is that dairy love is NOT color blind. Whether your passion is driven by the color of the dairy breed or by the color of money … or both… the right answer is up to you?  End of argument.

 

 

 

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Hey PETA – You Don’t Know Jack!

Someone who does not work with animals on a daily basis may think that PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) champions a very worthy cause in defending animal rights.  The challenge is that the noble cause PETA started from, and the entity that it is today have grown a long ways apart.  Recently PETA has received a significant amount of publicity in regards to its unacceptable behavior.

One might forgive, or at least understand, PETA’s conduct in regard to Gillette Emperor Smurf EX-91, who won a Guinness World Record for Lifetime Milk Production achievement. Unfortunately, instead of talking from a position of fact or knowledge, they just pulled stuff out of their butts and leveled accusations at people who love animals with the same venom they use on people they charge with mistreating and exploiting dairy cattle. (Read more:  What PETA Does NOT KNOW about Raising Dairy Cattle!)

This reminds me of a movie my children like to watch called BEE Movie.  In it when  the bee, Barry B. Benson, graduates from college, he finds that he will have only one job for his entire life and, absolutely disappointed, he joins the team responsible for bringing the honey and pollination of the flowers to visit the world outside the hive. Once in Manhattan, he is saved by the florist Vanessa, and he breaks the bee law to thank Vanessa. They become friends, and Barry discovers that humans exploit bees to sell the honey they produce. Barry decides to sue the human race for having destructive consequences to nature.  Sure he wins the court case, which I am sure many PETA followers got excited about, but as a result of humans no longer being able to produce and eat honey, all the bees are not needed.  Eventually, they all stop working and, as a result; flowers are not pollinated; plants aren’t able to grow, and ultimately animals have nothing to eat, and humans and the whole ecosystem are devastated.   At the end of the movie, they show a dairy cow explaining her “beefs” to the bee Barry B Benson.  I am sure this also gave many PETA follows many incorrect ideas.

More recently PETA released a new video showing less-than-ideal situations on a Hickory, N.C., farm. The video shows cows slogging through incredibly thick manure. Their legs are dirty, and the amount of manure in the barn is unbelievable. The challenge is the video appears to be in fact a hoax and not an accurate depiction of the actual conditions or events at the Hickory dairy.   Carrie Mess, in a post on her website, DairyCarrie.com. Mess took still screenshots of the video, showing relatively clean cows walking through a very full (in terms of manure) manure alley in a free stall barn. While Carrie admits that she does not know the exact story about this specific Hickory dairy, there are certainly many inaccurate accounts and analysis by PETA about his particular farm.  PETA found her actions so “threatening” that they have served Carrie with a cease and desist letter, demanding a public apology and retraction of her article.  Something they are never willing to do themselves for their actions.  This fits with PETA`s formula. They find a farm with bad conditions or fabricate these conditions, link them to regional or national name brand, and get everyone talking about it, and then never being accountable for their actions.  Because of that, dairy farmers like Dairy Carrie get an undeserved black eye and now have a huge hill to climb to get the correct information out.

dog

It is interesting that PETA tactics have been able to continue for so long.  Despite themselves having been connected with the Animal Liberation Front (ALF), an FBI-designated “domestic terrorist“ group. PETA`s support of the ALF appears to include financing the legal defense of arrested ALF activists, providing resources to individual ALF cells, recruiting interns for the sole purpose of committing criminal acts at protests, and publicizing ALF activities in a favorable manner. One witness interviewed by the FBI (whom other sources have indicated was a former long-term PETA employee) made statements suggesting that PETA was formed as a cover for the Animal Liberation Front (ALF).  These are not the actions of a group whose number one concern is the ethical treatment of animals.

In fact the PETA, which claims to be dedicated to the cause of animal rights, can’t explain why its adoption rate is only 2.5 percent for dogs. Out of 760 dogs impounded in 2011, they killed 713, arranged for 19 to be adopted, and farmed out 36 to other shelters (not necessarily “no kill” ones). As for cats, they impounded 1,211, euthanized 1,198, transferred eight, and found homes for a grand total of five. PETA also took in 58 other companion animals — including rabbits. It killed 54 of them. These figures don’t reflect well on an organization dedicated to the cause of animal rights and possess a $30 million annual budget.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

While certainly not all dairy operations treat their cattle like they are at a spa (read more Westcoast), the vast majority do care for their animals responsibly. Good care is good commerce. Stress-free, healthy cows produce more milk and deliver more progeny over their lifetimes.  Just like at well-run company where they treat their employees well, dairy farmers know that how they treat their cattle has a direct impact on their bottom line. The challenge with organizations like PETA is that they sensationalize the story to elicit a strong reaction from their supporters in order to gain more support and funding.  The challenge with this is the tactics they are using are extremely questionable and hurt dairy farmers, who love their animals as much or more than PETA supporters do.  Do they ever take the same effort to highlight examples of the best treatment of animals?  Instead of working to understand the complete story, and working with producers to ensure proper treatment of animals, PETA looks to discredit the dairy industry with nothing more than lies, mistruths and inaccurate stories.  Ethical treatment is a label we all need to live up to.  Otherwise, PETA — you don’t know Jack!

 

 

 

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Introducing BullvineTV – The Dairy Breeding Industry Now Has Its Own Channel

Already the most read daily digital dairy publication in the world, www.thebullvine.com is now adding BullvineTV to its portfolio.

Always looking for new and different ways to bring you that latest news, events and perspective on the dairy industry, BullvineTV will focus on providing thoughtful and unique content that will make you laugh but also make you stop and think.

Considered by many to be their morning shot of “RedBull” www.thebullvine.com has lived up to its promise to not be just another event reporting magazine.  Now with the introduction of BullvineTV we are taking dairy media to a whole new level.

Our inaugural shows include:

August 2014 Genetic Evaluations

The Top 10 Pick Up Lines Uttered at World Dairy Expo

Hey PETA – You Don’t Know Jack!

The Bullvine Bottom Line

We are something different, something real. We’re what’s been missing for real dairy breeders. With the introduction of BullvineTV we are again giving insight and hosting lively debate about the people, products and services that are revolutionizing the dairy breeding industry.

Why ALL Dairy Farmers Should Get Excited About Proof Day!

For the 1% of breeders who deal in seed stock Proof Days are like Christmas 3x times a year.  But for the remaining 99% of dairy breeders proof days, the days when the latest Genetic Evaluations are released, are not that big a deal.  But they should be.

The following are three reasons all dairy producers should be checking out the latest genetic evaluations.

All producers should be using the best genetics possible

Analysis conducted as a cooperative effort between Canadian Dairy Network (CDN) and the milk-recording agency in Québec, Valacta, examined the association between the average profit per cow at the herd level and the genetic potential of the herd for various traits.

dairyprofit

Figure 1 shows the relationship between the average LPI and the average profit per cow per day in each herd studied. While there are some exceptions to the rule, the dark line in the graph reflects the average relationship across the LPI scale, which indicates that herds with higher average LPI levels of their cows also have higher profit values. This positive correlation between LPI and profit clearly shows that genetics is a significant contributing factor but that management also plays a major role. On average, for every 100-point difference in LPI at the herd level there is an increase in profit per cow per year of $50, which accumulates from year to year. From a sire selection perspective, this equivalence translates to a difference of $50 more profit per daughter per year for every 200-point difference in the sire’s LPI value.  Based on a 50% conception rate, that would indicate that the semen from a sire who is 400 LPI points higher than the average sire, should cost $50 more.  Applying this to the current sires available, by using a sire such as AltaRazor who has an LPI of +3038 you will generate and extra $187.50 compared to a sire with an LPI of 1500.  This is from direct daughter profitably and does not even factor in the increased performance of any progeny this cow would produce.  So then investing $50 to $100 more for semen that will deliver over $180 in return is certainly a profitable decision even for commercial milk producers.

The Grass Is Always Greener on the Other Side of the Fence

I often hear many producers quote the minimum levels for certain traits that they are willing to use.  The challenge with that is while this approach is great for setting basic criteria, it fails to look at how these sires compare to other sires.  By using “any” sire that meets their criteria they are missing out on maximizing the genetics gain, and therefore the profitability of their herd.  As demonstrated above setting a minimum threshold, instead of going for maximum return, is leaving dollars on the table, and not in the milk check.  Then there is the case where some milk producers prefer to deal with only one semen sales representative or A.I. company.  No A.I. company has all the best sires (Read more: Stud Wars: Episode II – April 2014), so by employing this practices any savings or efficiencies you gain from negations, are negated by the amount you are costing yourself in loss of genetic potential.  (Read more: Rumors, Lies, and other stuff Salesmen will tell you and Are There Too Many Semen Salesmen Coming In The Lane?)

Are You Sure You Are Getting What You Pay For?

With the latest reports indicating that genomic young sire use is approaching 60% in North America, many producers have embraced genomics in a significant way (Read more: Why 84% of Dairy Breeders Will Soon Be Using Genomic Sires!).  I have even come across herds that have gone to 100% genomic young sire use.  With such a heavy usage of sires that are 60-70% reliable, are you sure that the sires that you are using are delivering on the other end?  A great way to check this is to see how the sires you are investing in, are doing when they receive their official daughter proof.  Sure that may not mean that you go back and use these sires once they are proven, but it does help you get a better understanding of the reliability of the genetics that you have invested in.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

I am not saying that all dairy producers should be waiting with baited breath at 8 am on proof day.  However, there is certainly value in taking the time to check out the latest sire evaluations, to see how the sires you have been using are performing and what other sires are out there that could help you increase the profitability of your herd.  No matter what your management style, there are certainly enough reasons for you to get excited on proof day.

Check out the latest Holstein Sires Proofs in our Genetics Section


The Dairy Breeders No BS Guide to Genomics

 

Not sure what all this hype about genomics is all about?

Want to learn what it is and what it means to your breeding program?

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Why Subclinical Hypocalcemia Can Sink You Faster Than The Titanic!

Hypervigilance is the new watchword for profitable dairy farming in the 21st Century.  Cow comfort in clean, stress-free environments is getting the attention and implementation that makes milk production a rewarding experience for both staff and animals.  But even with this focus and continuing advances in cow management, there is one under-diagnosed disease that is linked to almost every disease that has onset around the time of calving. This disease is subclinical hypocalcemia (milk fever) and it’s sneaky, harmful and costly.

Hypocalcemia is Most Apparent in Its Subclinical Form

Recognition and treatment of milk fever (hypocalcemia) at calving is becoming well-recognized and treatment protocols are in place on well-managed dairies. Unfortunately subclinical hypocalcemia, because of its non-symptomatic nature, is not dealt with as efficiently. It’s easier for cows to get enough calcium from the food eaten when they are late in their lactation or early in the dry period.  But as they get closer to giving birth, the calf’s bones are growing rapidly, and the need for calcium increases by two to ten grams a day. Subclinical hypocalcemia is defined as low blood calcium concentrations without clinical signs of milk fever.

One Out of Every Two Cows Has Subclinical Hypocalcemia

Subclinical hypocalcemia affects about 50% of second and greater lactation dairy cattle fed typical pre-fresh diets. If anions are supplemented to reduce the risk for milk fever, the percentage of hypocalcemic cows is reduced to about 15 to 25% (Oetzel, 2004). Cows with high body condition at calving also are more likely to have hypocalcemia. However, subclinical hypocalcemia does not present with recognizable symptoms, and can only be diagnosed when blood samples which must be collected within the first 1 to 2 days post-calving and blood calcium concentration is determined to be below 8.5 md/dl.

Jersey and Guernsey cattle are more susceptible to the disorder.

One reason for this is that Jersey cattle have fewer vitamin D receptors than Holstein cattle.  Incidence increases with higher milk production and successive lactations.  First-calf heifers rarely develop clinical hypocalcemia because they produce less colostrum and milk and can more rapidly mobilize calcium from bone in their growing skeleton.  Reinhardt and co-workers at the National Animal Disease Center in Ames, Iowa, found the prevalence of clinical hypocalcemia was 1% for first-lactation, 4% for second-lactation, 7% for third-lactation, and 10% for fourth-lactation Holstein cows in a study where 1,462 cows were sampled.

Studies Show Reduced Dry Matter Intake

In recent studies used a group of induced subclinical hypocalcemic cows and a control group of normalcemic cows no differences were detected in heart and respiratory rates, rectal temperature, and white blood cell counts between the two groups.  However, subclinically hypocalcemic cows had a major decline in dry matter intake, from 26 lbs of dry matter/day on the days before, to 12 lbs of dry matter/day during hypocalcemia, whereas the decline in dry matter intake in normocalcemic cows during the infusion of saline was of only 4 lbs/day.

Subclinical Hypocalcemia Is Sinking Dairy Herds

Subclinical hypocalcemia could be a contributing factor in herds with a high incidence rate of metabolic disorders. A recent study (Martinez et al., 2012) defined subclinical hypocalcemia as serum total calcium below 8.59 mg/dl during any of the first 3 days in milk.  Cows with subclinical hypocalcemia in this study also had reduced pregnancy rate and longer days open. Other problems such as the following can be attributed to hypocalcemia:

  • Can inhibit muscle and nerve activity and lead to increased risk of injuries due to falling and slipping.
  • Subclinical hypocalcemia has a blocking effect on immune function
  • Greater risk of developing milk fever, metritis, ketosis, retained placenta and pneumonia.
  • Poor smooth muscle function brings on slower GI tract activity, so a cow feels full when it’s not, and eats less. The loss of dry matter intake continues to decrease calcium intakes and the cascade continues.

Check for Higher Rates of Uterine Disease

One of the most common health problems affecting dairy cows is uterine disease. It affects 20 to 30 per cent of the cows either in confinement or in grazing systems. Recently, a group at the University of Florida (Martinez et al., 2012 J. Dairy Sci. 95: 874-887) documented that cows with subclinical hypocalcemia in the first 3 days postpartum had 3-fold greater risk of developing metritis and 11 times the risk of developing metritis concurrent with fever, compared with cows with normal blood Ca after calving.

Is there Increased Incidence of Endometritis?

There were other interesting results. “Cows with subclinical hypocalcemia also had increased incidence of endometritis, a disease that is less recognized by producers and characterized by presence of pus in the uterus after 3 weeks postpartum. It is thought that the inability to eliminate the typical bacterial contamination of the uterus after calving predisposes cows to develop inflammation of the uterus and extension of the period in which pathogens remain in the uterus of dairy cows. In fact, cows with subclinical hypocalcemia had immune cells with impaired function, which is thought to explain some of the inability to eliminate the bacterial contamination with the onset of parturition.”

Compromised Reproductive Performance

Not only do cows with subclinical hypocalcemia have increased risk of uterine diseases, but they also have compromised reproductive performance. The interval from calving to pregnancy becomes extended from 109 days in normocalcemic to 124 days in cows with subclinical hypocalcemia. This means that the affected cows had more diseases and also had a 15-day delay to become pregnant. Fifteen more days means that more cows will be needed to meet production goals. There are more dry days and other logistical issues that this causes.

Subclinical Hypocalcemia Steals Profits

Oetzel at the University of Wisconsin has estimated that the economic cost of subclinical hypocalcemia in a dairy herd is four times the cost of clinical cases, thus resulting in a substantial impact on profitability of dairy operations. This increased economic cost is attributed to the greater number of cows with subclinical versus clinical hypocalcemia even though a subclinical case costs 40% of a clinical case.

The Oetzel research gives this sobering example. “If a 2000- cow herd has a 2% annual incidence of clinical milk fever and each case of clinical fever costs $300 (Guard, 1996), the loss to the dairy from clinical cases is about $12,000 per year.  If the same herd has a 30% incidence of subclinical hypocalcemia in second and greater lactation cows (assuming they are 65% of cows in the herd) and each case costs $125 (an estimate that accounts for milk yield reduction and direct costs due to increased ketosis and displaced abomasums), then the total herd loss from subclinical hypocalcemia is about $48,750 per year.  This is about 4 times greater than the cost of the clinical cases. (Tri-State Dairy Nutrition Conference – April 23 and 24, 2013).

Pro-Active Prevention Strategies

A general rule of thumb is that no more than 15%-20% of cows should have blood calcium levels below 8.5 mg/dl at calving. As with all metabolic disorders, prevention is the key.

  • The use of anionic salts until the urinary pHs are between 6.0 and 6.3. (Jerseys, 5.5-5.8)
  • An intentional strategy for oral calcium supplementation is cost-effective due to increased milk yield in supplemented cows.  Most second- and greater-lactation cows should be given an oral dose at the time of calving and a second dose about 12 hours later.
  • Oral calcium supplementation is the best approach for hypocalcemia in cows that are still standing, such as cows in Stage 1 hypocalcemia or who have undetected subclinical hypocalcemia (Oetzel, 2011).  Cows absorb an effective amount of calcium into her bloodstream with about 30 minutes of supplementation.  Blood calcium concentrations are support for only about four to six hours afterwards (Goff and Horst, 1993, 1994) for most forms of calcium supplementation.
  •  Blood calcium levels and urinary pH levels are inversely related.  Properly acidified animals will have urinary pH between 6.0 and 6.3.
  • Feeding a negative DCAD diet 21 days pre-fresh has been shown to prevent clinical (a five-fold reduction) and subclinical hypocalcemia.
  • More studies are needed before extending or reducing the number of days pre-fresh anionic salts are fed in the field.

Raise the Subclinical Threshold to 8.5 Mg/dl (2.1 mmol/l)

As previously mentioned subclinical hypocalcemia occurs in dairy cows with blood calcium concentrations at or below 8.0 mg/dl (2.0 mmol/l) but not showing clinical signs.  Recently, Martinez and co-workers at the University of Florida suggested that the cut-off should be raised to 8.5 mg/dl (2.1 mmol/l) because cows below this concentration were more likely to develop metritis or metabolic disorders. Using this higher criterion, Reinhardt and co-workers’ data indicate that over 65% of mature cows and 51% of first-calf heifers were below this threshold. Research suggests that subclinical hypocalcemia may be directly associated with other metabolic disorders and may be the primary or secondary cause of decreased performance.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

Prevention of hypocalcemia should go beyond minimizing milk fever after calving. It is necessary to take proactive steps to reduce the prevalence of cows that develop subclinical hypocalcemia.  Even though the attack may be unseen, using prevention strategies could have a very positive and visible effect on your dairy profitability. Don’t become the next statistic of a preventable disaster. Remember the Titanic?

 

 

 

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US August 2014 Holstein Genetic Evaluation Highlights


Facebook debuts at #1 edging out Dorcy for the top spot on the official US Proven Sires list in August 2014.  Dorcy increases 51 points to +2318 TPI. With the addition of 240 daughters, his production proof moves ahead of former #1 Robust, who also increased 23 points to 2347, with the addition of 81 daughters in his production proof.   Also showing a significant increase, with additional daughter information, was AltaGreatest, who moves into the #4 proven TPI sire position at +2330.  Bookem holds steady at #5 with 859 more daughters added to his production proof and a TPI of +2319.  The biggest surprise, AltaFairway, comes in at +2263, 149 points higher than his genomic proof to take the #6 proven sire ranking. Making the jump from #16 in April to #7 this proof round is Myrle, with the addition of 24 daughters in his production proof and 86 daughters in his type evaluation. Myrle now stands at +2251 TPI. Junior is a relatively unexpected sire who debuts at #8, with a TPI of +2243.  Although Massey has remained in the top 10 proven TPI sires for over two years now, he drops from the #4 spot to #9.  Rounding out the top 10 proven sires is another new release sire, Grafeeti, his TPI is +2226.

RankNameSire StackGTPIPTATCow FamilyA.I. Station
1BUTZ-HILL SUPERSIRE 1757-ETSupersire x Man-O-Man x Dolman26073.17Eastside Lewisdale Gold MissyJetstream
2ZAHBULLS UNO GULLIVERNumero Uno x Dorcy x Toystory25973.63Johnan Toystory GlitterAlta
3EDG RUBY MOGUL 1336-ETMogul x Robust x Planet25772.76Snow-N Denises DelliaJetstream
4VIEUXSAULE FLAME-ETNumero Uno x Freddie x Bolton25612.91Vieuxsaule Allen DragonflySemex
5VIEW-HOME MONTEREY-ETMcCutchen x Robust x Zenith25473.67Wesswood-HC Rudy MissyABS
6COOKIECUTTER PETRON HALOGENPetrone x Man O Man x Goldwyn25462.86Snow-N Denises DelliaSelect
7MORNINGVIEW MCC KINGBOY-ETMcCutchen x Super x Shottle25453.95Whittier-Farms Lead MaeSelect
8COYNE-FARMS JABIR-ETFacebook x Freddie x Ramos25312.63Coyne-Farms Ramos JellySemex
9BACON-HILL MONTROSS-ETMogul x Bolton x Rolex25253.05Pasen Mascot MarbleSelect
10S-S-I SUPERSIRE MAGICDAY-ETSupersire x Shamrock x Shottle25232.83Lynmead Celsius MinnowSelect
11DE-SU SS HONEYBEE 11569-ETSupersire x Bookem x Shottle25223.07Sully Shottle MaySelect
12S-S-I MAURICE HEADWAY-ETMaurice x Man O Man x Goldwyn25213.23Snow-N Denises DelliaSelect
13MATT-DARI MOGUL PAYTON-ETMogul x Man O Man x Shottle25132.69Straussdale Blackstar PansyAcceler
14RICHMOND-FD EL BOMBERO-ETNumero Uno x Super x Baxter25133.15Richmond-FD BarbieSemex
15LARCREST COMMANDER-ETMogul x Observer x Ramos25103.54Larcrest CosmpolitanABS
16DE-SU SHAN VOTTO 11607-ETMan-O-Shan x Meteor x Oman25083.53Wa-Del RC Blckstar MollySelect
17MR MOVIESTAR MARDI GRAS-ETMogul x Planet x Shottle25052.88Wesswood-HC Rudy MissyJetstream
18COYNE-FARMS JETSET-ETFacebook x Freddie x Ramos25012.36Coyne-Farms Ramos JellySemex
19S-S-I MOGUL REFLECTORMogul x Super x Ramos25002.99Clear-Echo Hershl D-Rac 822Select
20MR WELCOME SSI UNO TATUM-ETNumero Uno x Colby x FBI24993.05Clear-Echo 2635 Bol 1204Select
21CLEAR-ECHO LEXOR RACER-ETLexor x Observer x Ramos24972.94Clear-Echo Hershl D-Rac 822Acceler
22SANDY-VALLEY SS DETER-ETSupersire x Meteor x Sandy24963.34Snow-N Denises DelliaSelect
23FARNEAR FREEDOM FOOLS-ETSupersire x Freddie x Shottle24952.11Ms Kingstead Chief AdeenSelect
24SIEMERS MOGUL REAL-SEAL-ETMogul x Observer x Ramos24923.28Clear-Echo Hershl D-Rac 822Select
25EDG GEN SS 1418-ETSupersire x Freddie x Jetstream24922.76Morningview Converse JudyJetstream
26SANDY-VALLEY CASPIAN-ETSupersire x Man O Man x Mac24882.4Ralma Juror FaithSelect
27MELARRY NUMERO UNO MATT-ETNumero Uno x Explode x Baxter24883.34Happke Explode MallyAlta
28COYNE-FARMS JACEY CRI-ETIota x Massey x Ramos24872.74Coyne-Farms Ramos JellyGenex
29DE-SU LTM PONDER 11345-ETLithium x Russel x Wizard24872.33Pen-Col Mascot DeannaSelect
30DE-SU NOMINEE-ETNumero Uno x Massey x Ramos24872.37Coyne-Farms Ramos JellySemex
31L-L-M-DAIRY PRESIDENT-ETNumero Uno x Million x Jetstream24863.07L-L-M-Diary Rudolph PilgrimSemex
32S-S-I MOGUL DEFENDER-ETMogul x Man O Man x Durham24853.55Windsor-Manor Rud ZipSelect
33SIEMERS MOGUL PETYMogul x Explode x Mac24853.65Welcome Goldwyn PenyaSelect
34DE-SU 11620 NIRVANA-ETMogul x Planet x Shottle24852.8De-Su Marshal GeorgiaABS
35EILDON-TWEED CHOPS-ETMogul x Man O Man x Mac24843.58Tidy-Brook Sally Ned BoyAcceler
36DE-SU LTM RODGERS 11379-ETLithium x Russel x Wizard24831.92Pen-Col Mascot DeannaSelect
37WINNING-WAY MOONRAKERMogul x Baxter x Oman24742.49Peticote Mascot MaydayABS
38DE-SU MG DAVINCI 11288-ETMogul x Watson x Oman24732.91Wesswood-HC Rudy MissySelect
39ZIMMERVIEW MOGUL BUTLER-ETMogul x Planet x Lynch24732.77Pen-Col Mascot DeannaSelect
40WA-DEL MOGUL BRYANT-ETMogul x Super x Shottle24713.84Locker-Lane Rulph BrittanySemex
41COOL-LAWN MIXER KUHN-ETMogul x Man O Man x BWM Leader24682.98Morningview Rudy PintailAcceler
42KERNDTWAY KINGPIN-ETMcCutchen x Observer x Shottle24673.76Kerndtway Jolt DaisySelect
43MR NUMERO UNO ST-LOUIS-ETNumero Uno x Shot Al x Ramos24653.17Beachlawn Bell Cleitus ProSelect
44SEAGULL-BAY SUPERSIRE-ETRobust x Planet x Shottle24642.37Wesswood-HC Rudy MissySelect
45DE-SU 11491 FOSTER-TWMogul x Ramos x Shottle24632.51De-Su Marshal GeorgiaABS
46KELLERCREST LANCOME-ETEpic x Man O Man x Toystory24633.18Kellercrest Winken LynnAcceler
47MR WELCOME HILL TANGO-ETHill x Colby x FBI24623.16Clear-Echo 2635 Bol 1204Genex
48NORTH-ECHO NUMERO UNITE-ETNumero Uno x Bookem x Form Bret24612.33Pen-Col Mascot DeannaSelect
49FARNEAR-BH MR MCGIRT-ETMogul x Domain x Shottle24582.9Sully Shottle MaySelect
50CLEAR-ECHO ALTAPRIMO-ETNumero Uno x Man O Man x Laudan24572.49Clear-Echo Hershl D-Rac 822Alta

 

With four new release sires in the top 10, it certainly confirms that the rate of genetic advancement is continuing at a record pace.

Notable New Proven Sires:

Marbri Facebook - Aug 2014Facebook

Marbri Facebook
200HO03753
Man-O-Man x Airraid x Shottle

Sire: Long-Langs Oman Oman VG-86
Dam: Serenityhill Airraid Fawn
MGS: Sildahl Airraid EX-94
MGD: Marbri Shottle Fiona-Ets
MGGS: Picston Shottle EX-95
MGGD: Gleneil Finley Fair Isle

Debuting at #1 on the proven sires list is Marbri Facebook.  Facebook actually increased his numbers from his last genomic proof increasing 78 TPI points to +2356.  With 172 pounds of fat and protein, he stands out as a production improver. The area demonstrating the greatest improvement over his genomic numbers is his feet and legs with an increase from +0.39 to +2.09 FLC.  Though there are only 39 classified daughters in 26 herds, they seem to be delivering as expected.  Facebook daughters are tall and dairy with adequate strength and body depth.  He will need to be protected on pins as his genomic test, sire stack and daughter information all confirm his high pins.  Heavily used as a sire of sons, Facebook’s most-notable sons are MR Lookout P Enforcer (Read more: The 12 Holstein Sires to Maximize Genetic Gain), Coyne-Farms Jabir and Wind-N-Tail FB Dalton.

Opsal Altafairway - aug 2014AltaFairway

Opsal Altafairway
011HO10908
Planet x O Man x Morty

Sire: Ensenada Taboo Planet EX-90
Dam: Opsal O Man Fantasy EX-93 GMD DOM
MGS: O-Bee Manfred Justice EX-94
MGD: Opsal Morty Fantasia EX-92
MGGS: Stouder Morty GM
MGGD: Opsal Winchester Faith EX-90 GMD

With no sons at any A.I. units currently, it’s easy to say that no one was expecting AltaFairway to make it into the top 10 proven sires.  This Planet son out of Opsal O Man Fantasy 2E-93, one of the three highest classified O Man daughters, is now over 215,000 lifetime.  With 107 daughters in 49 herds in his type proof and 302 daughters in 71 herds in his production proof, AltaFairway can be expected to hold on to these substantial numbers since  his current evaluation is 11% higher than his DGV’s.  AltaFairway is a high fertility, production specialist that will sire strong mammary systems and functional conformation.   He will certainly need protected on his Feet & Legs, specifically his foot angle and leg curvature.

Ovina Juletta Junior - aug 2014Junior

Ovina Juletta Junior
001HO10219
Freddie x Toystory x Boliver

Sire: Badger-Bluff Fanny Freddie
Dam: Co-Op Tstory Julettarose VG-85
MGS: Jenny-Lou Mrshl Toystory
MGD: Ridge-Heights Evelyn Cri EX-90 DOM
MGGS: End-Road PVF Boliver EX-95
MGGD: Ridge-Heights Entry EX-90 GMD DOM

Another relatively unexpected sire, based on his initial genomic proof at +2143 TPI, Junior comes up big at +2243. TPI, with 135 daughters in his production proof and 78 in his type proof. His official proof is 5% higher than his genomic proof. With very few progeny genomically tested, it is easy to say that this sire was missed, even though he was part of the Co-op breeding program at Genex.  At over 2500 lbs of milk and 114 lbs of combined fat and protein, Junior is certainly a production sire who also transmits significant udder improvement.  Junior will need to be protected on his Feet & Legs, specifically his foot angle, his angularity and his high pins.

Ladys-Manor Rd Grafeeti - aug 2014Grafeeti

Ladys-Manor Rd Grafeeti
007HO10848
Freddie x Goldwyn x Debut

Sire: Badger-Bluff Fanny Freddie
Dam: Ladys-Manor Ruby D Grace EX-92
MGS: Braedale Goldwyn GP-84
MGD: Ladys-Manor Ruby D EX-90 GMD DOM
MGGS: Rickland Mandel Debut
MGGD: Ladys-Manor Ruby Jen EX-94 2E GMD DOM

From the Ladys-Manor Ruby Jen TV EX-94 2E GMD DOM family and three generations in a row of EX high production cows, Grafeeti is not a surprise at the top of the lists.  With many sons and daughters already testing high and well above parent average, Grafeeti’s debut near the top of the charts was expected.  Another early Freddie son, Grafeeti is from the same family that produced Shamrock.  While, unlike AltaFairway and Junior, who exceeded their initial genomic tests, Grafeeti’s extremely high parent average had him at +2316 TPI back in August of 2011. He now finds himself at +2226 with 261 daughters in his production proof and 82 daughters in his type evaluation.   Typical Grafeeti daughters have high components but not necessarily high milk.  They have an extremely strong mammary systems, with good feet and legs that can be a touch straight.  He will need protecting on his overall body depth and stature.

Genomic News

The genomic TPI list introduces a totally new top 10…

HerdCountOfficial GLPIDGV LPIPA LPIGPA LPI
Alta4102210859691043
Claynook39699821018995
Comestar31436136815071418
Gen-I-Beq51658170118001737
Gillette37716921045819
Lorka31239119011811187
Stanton67817371383970
Velthuis31369128017561452

 

Since these sires are all under a year of age, they have yet to have semen available.  The following would be the top 10 genomic sires with either semen available or available shortly.

HerdCountDGV vs. OfficialPA vs. OfficialGPA Vs. Official
Alta463-5321
Claynook3134926
Comestar3-6871-18
Gen-I-Beq54314279
Gillette3-7927348
Lorka3-49-58-52
Stanton6-43603189
Velthuis3-8838783

 

Notable Genomic Sires:

SEAGULL-BAY SILVER - aug 2014Silver

SEAGULL-BAY SILVER
HOUSAM72156794
029HO17573
MOGUL x SNOWMAN x PLANET

Sire: Mountfield Ssi Dcy Mogul
Dam: Seagull-Bay Snow Darling
MGS: Flevo Genetics Snowman
MGD: Ammon-Peachey Shauna VG-87
MGGS: Ensenada Taboo PlanetEX-90
MGGD: Pine-Tree Martha Sheen VG-86 DOM

Since Supersire put Seagull-Bay on the map (Read more: Charting the Right Course at Seagull Bay Dairy), everyone has been watching to see just who would be the next impact sire from this genomically gifted Rudy Missy family.  Now comes Silver who might have an even greater impact than Supersire has had.  Silver is a Mogul from the Snowman sister to Supersire.  Like Supersire, Silver has the ability to leave extreme production.  Moreover, just like Supersire, he will have a significant impact as a sire of sons as well.  Ranking in the top 1% of the breed for Milk, Fat, Protein, Type, and Udders tells you that Silver is going to make a lot of noise before everything is said and done.

COGENT SUPERSHOT - aug 2014Supershot

COGENT SUPERSHOT
HONLDM755898903
224HO02881
SUPERSIRE x SUPERSTITION x SHOTTLE

Sire: Seagull-Bay Supersire
Dam: Super-Classic Shot VG-86
MGS: Charlesdale Superstition
MGD: Classicshot VG-87
MGGS: Picston Shottle EX-95
MGGD: Clas Touch VG-86

Looking for a shot of production?  Then Supershot will score well for you.  The pedigree behind Supershot is certainly not well known among breeders, since the last 5 of his eight generations come from Dutch breeding.  Behind that is the US cow family at Vir-Clar Holsteins, tracing through the highly acclaimed Tirsvad Patron Claire EX92.  He hails from the same line as the famous Koepon Classy’s and Anderstrup Claire family, known worldwide for its ability to breed high-ranking females and bulls on numerous different bases.  Supershot has an extremely high genomic test, and his pedigree indicates that he should be able to sire those extreme production daughters many breeders are looking for.  Supershot should be protected on milking speed and dairy strength.

MR Delicious Coin 15006 - aug 2014Draco 15006

MR Delicious Coin 15006
151HO00698
Cashcoin x Robust x Planet

Sire: Farnear-Tbr-Bh Cashcoin
Dam: Miss Ocd Robst Delicious VG-86 DOM
MGS: Roylane Socra Robus
MGD: OCD Planet Danica EX-93 DOM
MGGS: Ensenada Taboo Planet EX-90
MGGD: Miss Elegant Delight-ET VG-88 DOM

Draco 15006 is and early Cashcoin son from Miss OCD Robst Delicious-ET VG-86 the former No.1 cow on the Locator List.  Even with an outstanding parent average, Draco 15006 DGV’s exceed his parent average by almost 10%. Something unheard of for a sire at this level.  Also, it is interesting to note that, though many genomic young sires from top TPI females get the majority of their genetics from their maternal line, Draco 15006 actually gets a larger contribution from his sire than from his dam. This is a strong indicator of sires that  hold their numbers (Read more: The 12 Genomic Sires Most Likely to Top the Proven TPI List in April 2016 and The Genomic Roller Coaster – Hold on it’s going to be a bumpy).  Look for Draco 15006 to sire extreme production, with strong type and solid health and fertility.  He will need to be protected on his feet & legs, specifically his foot angle and heal depth, as well as on his dairy strength/body depth.

Mr Mogul Delta 1427Delta

Mr Mogul Delta 1427
203HO01468
Mogul x Robust x Planet

Sire: Mountfield Ssi Dcy Mogul
Dam: Miss Ocd Robst Delicious VG-86 DOM
MGS: Roylane Socra Robust
MGD: OCD Planet Danica EX-93 DOM
MGGS: Ensenada Taboo Planet EX-90
MGGD: Miss Elegant Delight-ET VG-88 DOM

Delta is a Mogul brother to Draco and is from the WINDSOR-MANOR RUD ZIP-ET 3E 95 GMD DOM family.  Delta offers extreme health and fertility traits with solid type and substantial production.  Breeders who are looking for tall framey two-year-olds will certainly not want to use Delta, but he does offer significant udder improvement.  Delta is among the breed leaders for productive life.

 

Check out our Genetic Evaluations Section for more proof info

Canadian Holstein Genetic Evaluations Highlights – Shuffling the Deck – AltaRazor Trumps the LPI List!


While no newly proven bulls enter the Top 10 LPI this round, bulls moving up into the Top 10, as well as shuffled rankings, result in new #1 and #2 bulls. Moving up 93 LPI points, Mel-Crest AltaRazor  AltaBaxter x Goldwyn) now leads the breed for LPI and is the #2 ranked bull for Fat. Since his first official proof in Canada last August, Regancrest AltaIota-ET (O Man x Ito) has been no stranger to the Top 5 LPI. This round, while adding over 500 daughters to both his production and type proofs, he ranks the highest he has to date at #2 LPI. The previous LPI leader, Flevo Genetics Snowman (O Man x BW Marshall), dropped slightly falling to #3 position. Maintaining a stable LPI yet descending in rank, De-Su Gillespy-ET (Bolton x Shottle) now sits at #4 LPI and #10 Milk. The well-known bull, Man-O-Man (O Man x AltaAaron), moves slightly back up the list from #8 to #5 LPI. Lirr Drew Dempsey (Goldwyn x Derry) and Sully AltaMeteor (Planet x Shottle) jumped up the list into the Top 10 LPI, positioning themselves at #6 and #7, respectively. Dempsey does so while adding over 500 daughters to his production proof and over 400 to his type proof, for which he maintains his status at #1 Conformation. Sildahl Jett Air-ET (AltaBaxter x BW Marshall) also moves up in rank, now occupying the #8 spot for LPI. With over 5000 milk-recorded and classified daughters in his proof, Mainstream Manifold (O Man X BW Marshall) takes #9 LPI and is tied at #10 Protein. UFM-Dubs AltaEsquire-ET (O Man x AltaSam) completes the Top 10 LPI list this round and is #4 in the breed for Fat.

A Team of New Bulls Wins Their Way into the Top 50 LPI

This round sees 99 young sires graduate to proven status as well as a first official  domestic LPI for 16 bulls first progeny proven outside of Canada. Planet and Million each sired 16 of the newly proven bulls in Canada, and Planet is the most common sire of bulls in the Top 100 LPI with 18 sons. O Man, Goldwyn, Bolton and AltaBaxter each have at least 10 proven sons in this group as well. The Top 50 LPI this round is infiltrated by 16 newly proven sires, the highest of which is Dream-Prairie BG Bruno-ET (Bolton x Goldwyn) at #11 LPI. Identical brothers, Larcrest Chavez-ETS and Larcrest Camelot-ETS (Planet x Ramos) receive the same genetic and genomic evaluations and therefore share #14 LPI position. Following on their heels are new releases Comestar Lemust (#16 LPI, Planet x Bolton) and the uniquely pedigreed Va-Early Dawn Sudan CRI-ET (#17 LPI, Jammer x Sailor). Gen-I-Beq Lavaman (#21 LPI, Man-O-Man x Goldwyn), the French-born bull Duc (#22 LPI, Mr Burns x O Man), Larcrest Contrast-ET (#23 LPI, Alexander x Shottle) and Parile Loto (#25 LPI, Man-O-Man x Goldwyn) complete the list of newly proven bulls in the Top 25 for LPI. Other newly proven bulls to penetrate the Top 50 LPI this round include Da-So-Burn Dane-ET (Man-O-Man x Goldwyn) at #27, Regan-ALH A Denario-ET (Alexander x Goldwyn) at #29, Misty Springs Smokin (Lavanguard x FBI) at #38 and De-Su Phoenix 588-ET (Planet x Bolton) at #39 LPI. Tied at #45 LPI are Gillette Tavares (Planet x Shottle) and the fourth new release carrying the Larcrest prefix from the Cosmopolitan family, Larcrest Casanova-ETS (Goldwyn x Shottle). Benner Jeter (Planet x Goldwyn) finishes off the new releases in the Top 50 LPI at #50. Other noteworthy changes include the drop of Morningview AltaToyota from #4 LPI to #19 and Blondin Careyprice from #14 to #61 LPI.

“Bookem” Daughter Emerges as a New Top 10 GLPI Cow

Without reaching official proof status in Canada, the popular genomic young bull, De-Su 521 Bookem-ET (Planet x Ramos), has a daughter, Ms Lookout Pesc BKM Bria-ET, that penetrates the Top 10 GLPI list at #6 and is the highest newly indexed cow this round. For the fourth consecutive proof release, Ste Odile Manoman Model Saphir leads the breed as the #1 GLPI cow and is #9 Fat. Staying strong at #2 GLPI, now only 20 LPI points behind, is Velthuis S G Snow Evening. Moving up the list this round and landing tied at #3 GLPI are Ste Odile Manoman Mod Platine and Larcrest Cinergy-ET, who is also the new #1 Fat and maternal sister of identical newly proven brothers Chavez and Camelot (#14 LPI). Maryclerc Snowman Crystal drops down a position to #5 GLPI. Beaucoise Iota Ptolome moves up from #11 to #7 GLPI this round while Comestar Lautamisha Snowman, maternal sister to the newly proven Comestar Lemust (#16 LPI), stays firm at #8 GLPI. Sully Hartford Snwmn 282-ET, from the same family as #7 LPI bull AltaMeteor, slips a notch from #8 to #9 GLPI. Finishing off the list is a third cow in the Top 10 GLPI carrying the Ste Odile prefix, namely Ste Odile Manifold Model Jane, who rose 30 points and jumped from #22 to tie at #9 GLPI. In addition to Ms Lookout Pesc BKM Bria-ET at #6 GLPI, three other newly indexed cows this round manage an appearance among the Top 15 cows for GLPI. These include Cleroli Snowman Caramilk (#11 GLPI, full sister to Crystal at #5 GLPI), Stantons Bookem Epidemic (#12 GLPI, daughter of Stantons Manoman Ezra) and OCD Iota Savannah-ET at #14 GLPI, daughter of Ammon-Peachey Shana-ET.

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