Archive for January 2020

Use 20/20 Hindsight to Build 2020 Vision

We are almost one month into 2020 and here at The Bullvine we are eager to be a relevant resource and sounding board for the new dairy year. For some of us, the indulgences of the holiday season are affecting both our waistlines and our health goals.  It would be wonderful if we could grow our businesses as easily. In fact, we can, if we take what we know and turn it into actions.

“Taking a Risk Can Work but The Entire Dairy Team Must Work Too!”

Dairying in 2020 will have struggles as dairy farmers face multiple risk ranging from volatile milk prices, trade wars and declining milk demand. Throw in more recent risk of being slammed in the press or facing health and production risks from changing climate and environmental factors.  The good news is that these symptoms of distress are fixable. None of them are easy, but the pathway is possible. Dairy operations must start by pulling the team together and taking the necessary action steps. Is the goal more milk with less work?  Increased fed efficiency per pound of milk produced.  Lower bulk tank SCC.  Raise first service pregnancy rate.  Dramatic improvements can occur in as few as 12 to 18 months. We must stop searching for headlines that deny the challenges and then buckle down as dairy managers always do. Get to work.

“Effective 2020 Change Starts at the Top”

Whether you are the actual top, meaning ownership of the dairy or whether you are the manager, change starts at the top.  More clearly.  Change starts in the heads of those at the top.  Whatever is wrong with your dairy in 2020, it is functioning exactly as you have designed it. The first step to better dairy profitability is to accept that you are responsible for where you are today.  You are also responsible for creating a 2020 plan of action that works. Then make sure that it is communicated to every person who is part of the process. Know it. Do it.

“Who Should Go? Who Should Stay?”

Even if your dairy team has recognized dairy stars, a bloated dairy team pulls the rest of your operation down. Dairy superstars have to work twice as hard when teamed up with a poor performer.  The hardest working dairy staff probably won’t say anything.  They will just suck it up and work twice as hard and burn out that much faster.  Do you have some staff that are just poor performers? You must have at least one or two…Come on, be honest.  If you do, then you need to let them go. 

Letting people go is not an easy task for most dairy managers. We extend endless second chances. Let go and improve your bottom line.  It will also improve team morale.  The cattle herd and the dairy humans will both benefit. ‘Happy employee make happy cows” and we all know “Happy cows make milk.” Move forward with well-considered cow culling and staff cuts.

“Learn to Dairy by the 2020 Numbers”

If we expect to realize our 2020 resolutions, we must be prepared to gather and use all the data.  One business source categorically states that 4 in 10 businesses don’t have a budget.  Success or failure follows the numbers. First get the data measurements for your dairy operation and then respond to what the numbers say. You don’t want to measure yourself against oft quoted “averages”.  What you want are the actual numbers of your own dairy farm.  Know where you are at this exact time. It is important to target each step from where you are now to where you need to be.  For example, targeting 110 pounds per day milk production may be a long way off.  Don’t mimic the actions of the herd that is almost there already. You can’t get there by feeding a 110-pound ration to a cow that is currently producing 80 pounds of milk. To do so risks failure and also risks health issues. Target each small step. Start today.

“Not All Dairy Consultants Are Long Term List Ready”

Make list of the suppliers to whom you pay money.  Make a corresponding list of the exact service or services they provide that make your dairy profitable.  Make a simple note of the last time each one met or exceeded your expectations.  Do they provide actionable advice?  Do you count on them for reliable delivery and excellent follow-up on the paperwork?  Don’t value suppliers on the basis of perks like a trip to an exotic meeting location, sports tickets or a new jacket or cap.  These giveaways are pleasant but they don’t put money into your dairy bank account.  Is your value as a customer being recognized by those who count on your checks? A 2020 dairy vision requires us to challenge the entire dairy team, including the ones who are off the farm.  Keep the ones that meet changing needs and eliminate those who have become more social than business driven.

 “Cut The 2020 Fat”

We need to continue this conversation because dairy operations that will remain financially viable in 2020 are already experts in cutting expenses. At boardroom tables around the dairy industry, CEOs and Financial Planning Departments have distributed lists, enumerating projected expenses and projected profit targets based on the needs and expectations of their head office gurus.  The trickle down effect has every area manager and salesperson looking for ways to reach those targets.  Dairy customers – such as your dairy farm — represent a number that they must check off on their road to success.  For years, we assumed this was a win-win situation.  The veterinarians, feed company, processor and many others, provided something we needed.  We used it.  We produced a healthy product. It was a win-win.  In 2020, we need to check each of these inputs more carefully and make sure that we are actual receiving a value-added input. If not, we must cut the fat.

“From Reflex Resolutions to Real Dairy Reality”

Many of us indulge in making New Year’s Resolution.  Before we even see February 2020 we know whether our plans are achievable or if we are already crying over spilled milk.  Remarkable success needs to build from a foundation that focuses on actual dairy logistics that we can do better, faster, cheaper.  This is what our individual dairy value proposition is built on. We say we are intelligent dairy managers but dairy success doesn’t arrive just because we were good at breeding show winners, or because we have a PhD in AgBusiness or because we are descended from generations of dairy farmers. What do we do that is EXCEPTIONAL and IMPORTANT to our dairy’s success?  If you can’t answer these questions, the question of our ability to produce relevant success is also unknown.

“Technical Transformation Will Continue to Shape 2020”

We now browse the internet for information, take pictures with our smartphones and send emails from our laptops.  This is digitization.  If we truly expect to transform our dairies we have to go beyond a few technical process upgrades and embrace digital transformation. Farmers are increasingly using drones, daily satellite based images and near autonomous robots. Digital transformation is a process. It will make huge strides in satisfying the end customer of our dairy products.  And – when all is said and done -satisfying the end customer is the very reason why we are in the dairy business.

“The Difference Is in The Details”

Although you may think the preceding proposals are difficult, there still remains the important task of summarizing your 2020 vision into a clear and concise action document.  This gives you clear talking points to present to every financial advisor, farm consultant, vet, nutritionist, and geneticist that you work with. Details must be written down. Shared. Remembered and Repeated.

“Is this 2020 dairy decision making so difficult that it’s impossible?”

No! What makes this visionary foresight possible is simply getting started?  Start sharing it with people who know what dairy success looks like. Start with yourself and your staff. Revise and refine.  Once you have adjusted your draft, get back to your team and put it into action.

“You’ve Got to Give, In Order to Earn What You Take”

When we break it down this way, the changing dairy industry economics become easier to manage. We can’t just explain a desire for change. Instead, we need to actively define people’s expectations. We need dairy customers to feel like we’re giving, not taking. We need to feel that our dairy suppliers are adding value, not trying to extract it. We have to show customers that, our goal of a healthy food product is in complete alignment with their expectations. Yes, we must show the foresight that shows them the that we’re always looking out for them and their needs.  They can expect to be taken care of. The same must be true of the other members of the supply team.

THE BULLVINE BOTTOM LINE

Leading a 2020 dairy operation into the future is all about what you are looking for.  Eyes wide open doesn’t mean being blind to serious issues and risks.  It does mean working every single day to make the conditions, cows and dairy teams the best they can be. Attainable and sustainable.  Here’s to seeing our dairy business with ever greater clarity this year.

 

 

 

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Tomorrow’s Dairy Cattle Genetic Evaluations Must Consider Environments

Have you ever wondered why some sires’ daughters perform better in some herds or environments than they do in others?  I have.  The current sire indexing system may rank two sires as being of equal genetic merit, yet their daughters may perform differently in the individual tie stall barns of cold Minnesota compared to the 400+ cow groupings in the heat and humidity of a Florida cow shed.  The system assumes that there are not performance expression differences due to environment.

Geneticists do not know enough about what happens on farm

It is a known fact that our geneticists do not have enough details about the animals’ health events, ability to perform in large groups, differing nutritional programs within a herd, calf-heifer disease and many other matters when processing the genetic evaluations to produce genetic indexes. Without the details, geneticists can only assume all animals in a herd are treated equally. We all know that this not the case.

Other Livestock have similar Challenges

Recently I read an interesting presentation (EPDs only one part of the genetic selection formula, 2018 Canadian Beef Breeds Council’s Technical Forum) by P J Budler of Modern Ova Trends on beef cattle genetic indexing. He cautioned about using EPDs (Estimated Predicted Differences aka genetic indexes) without also considering nutrition, herd management, animal health, forage program, animal marketing program, record keeping, human capital and farm finances.  His article also made mention about breed performance differences that depend on environment. His example was fertile Black Angus cows that are great at raising calves in the sometimes harsh cold of the Upper Plains of the United States and Western Canadian Provinces but put them in a hot semi-tropical environment and they do not graze, stand in ponds and they do not breed back.  My summation of Budler’s presentation is – a) environment, management and nutrition play a role in an animal’s expression of its genetic make-up and b) sires need to be proven in the environment in which their future daughters will perform.

Plant scientists in genetically evaluating varieties of corn, need to know the length of the growing season, heat units, soil type, tillage program, nutrient program, plant population, spray program and more in order to make accurate predictions on a variety’s ability to perform. The extent of the data captured from corn test plots is huge.

Likewise, it is a fact that livestock genetics do not work independent of nutrition, animal health, animal care, animal management and the environment.

Assuming can lead to Errors

Budler’s presentation got me thinking. Does the dairy cattle breeding industry make too many assumptions about animal treatment equality, when we do our genetic evaluations?

We have super super computers and very advanced methods to statistically analyze data, but we have not expanded the data forwarded to genetic evaluation labs.

Every Bullvine reader can think of a long list of factors beyond genetics that can affect an animal’s performance and for which geneticists do not have data available for inclusion when they do their analysis.  This list includes all the things that happen from birth to removal from the herd. Some things like calf morbidity, calf growth, hoof trimming, disease occurrence and animal grouping are not known. And yes, each one on its own may be minor in its affect but in total they lead to errors being made, when it comes to genetically ranking animals in the population. 

More Data Can Help

I often hear dairy people say – but that trait has a low heritability so we should not pay much attention to an index until the reliability of prediction is over 90%.

We need to ask – if we could have more data for the animals could the prediction accuracies be increased?

Feet, as currently scored by classifiers, has a low heritability.  Could the heritability for feet be increased if the geneticists knew details about calf hoof growth, housing environment of calves, heifers and cows, how recent was the last hoof trimming, have the feet ever been trimmed and has the animal ever been lame?

For more and more milking cows we electronically have observations from every milking (90 data points per month), the nearest weather station can provide the weather for the each day, in-barn monitors capture extensive information, … yet, the dairy cattle improvement industry (breeders and organizations) persist in using one milking or one day’s observations per month to calculate milk yields and ignore data from in-barn monitoring systems. In addition, animal performance beyond milk cows is non-existent in our central data bases.

There are never too many known facts when it comes to making accurate genetic index predictions and information available for managing a dairy herd.

The Goal in Genetic Evaluations

The goal in genetic evaluations is to accurately predict an animal’s ability to transmit a trait relative to other animals in the population.  Of course, ability can be both positive and negative.

Every breeder’s goal is to have the perfect animal for a trait and for that animal to transmit that perfection to the next generation. Perfection is not achieved by making decisions based on averages.

More Data Points affect all Aspects of a Dairy Herd

  1. As mentioned above having more animal, herd and farm data will enhance herd nutrition and management. In fact, those two disciplines will determine 75% of herd profit.
  2. Bullvine readers continuously learn about new on-farm monitoring devices. The data they supply should be included in the national data base if it can assist in improving herd profit.
  3. Dairy farmers will experience even tighter financial margins in the future. Data points that contribute to increased profit are a “must have” in the national data base.
  4. With more and more cloud or on-farm animal / herd management softwares in use, some farmers are talking about discontinuing to use DHI and breed services. If that is done it stops data from being available for benchmarking and for enhancing improvement services.
  5. It is highly unlikely that sires will ever be sampled and proven randomly across all herd environments scenarios. So, having more data points will assist in genetic index accuracy, especially for low heritability traits.
  6. More data especially feed efficiency, animal health, animal fertility, calves and heifers will assist in increasing the reliabilities of genomic indexes. Even to 90+% REL within the next decade.

Something to think about

Determining an animal’s lifetime profit is a marathon that starts at birth and ends when the animal leaves the herd. The performance and events focus in the past has been the lactations of the milking cows, thereby the industry has been missing the data from significant parts of each animal’s life.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

It is time for breeders and their representatives on committees and boards to think to the future and the need to use more on-farm data.

The accuracy and number of traits included in genetic evaluations and on-farm performance reporting can be significantly increased by having more on-farm data reach the central national data bases. Use it, not waste it!

 

 

 

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Swiss Expo Holstein Show 2020

January 18, 2020 @ Geneva, Switzerland
Judge; Joel Lepage

Sunibelle Dempsey ESPRIT
Grand Champion – 2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Markus v.k / N.Sudan, G.Jones, P.Conroy,Agriber, Q. Serrabassa,

GRAND CHAMPION: SUNIBELLE DEMPSEY ESPRIT, VK MARKUS/ N.SUDAN, G.JONES, P.CONROY, AGRIBER, Q.SERRABASSA
RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION: HANNA-VRAY (G W ATWOOD), MARC ET ERHARD JUNKER & OSCAR DUPASQUIER
HM GRAND CHAMPION: SOUS REVERS O KALIBER ODESSA, 1ST CLASS 18, GRATWOHL FAVRE FLORENCE SEBASTIEN

HANNA-VRAY (Atwood)
Grand Champion Udder – 2020 Swiss Expo​ Holstein Show

Junker Marc et Erhard / Dupasquier Oscar + Eric

GRAND CHAMPION UDDER: HANNA-VRAY (G W ATWOOD), MARC ET ERHARD JUNKER & OSCAR DUPASQUIER
RESERVE CHAMPION UDDER: GOYA (O’KALIBER), EDWIN STEINER & FERME LA WAEBERA
HM CHAMPION UDDER :SUNIBELLE DEMPSEY ESPRIT, MARKUS V.K/ N.SUDAN, G.JONES, P.CONROY, AGRIBER, Q.SERRABASSA

Gobeli’s Durango PERRY
Intermediate Champion
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Gobeli Holstein

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION: GOBELI’S DURANGO PERRY, GOBELI HOLSTEIN
RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION: COMESTAR DOORMAN O’KATRYSHA, WTS-GENETICS & COMESTAR HOLSTEINS
HM INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION: S BRO GOLD CHIP ALEXIS, EDWIN STEINER

Gobeli’s Durango PERRY
Intermediate Champion Udder
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Gobeli Holstein

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION BEST UDDER: GOBELI’S DURANGO PERRY, GOBELI HOLSTEIN
RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION BEST UDDER: S BRO GOLD CHIP ALEXIS, EDWIN STEINER
HM INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION BEST UDDERL: PETITCLERC ARCHRIVAL SALTA, EDWIN STEINER

H.Tobias Am Solomon ADENA
Junior Champion – 2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Alberto Medina, Planillo & Huerta Los Tobias

JUNIOR CHAMPION: H.TOBIAS AM SOLOMON ADENA, ALBERTO MEDINA, PLANILLO & HUERTA LOS TOBIAS
RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION: BEL SIDEKICK CALIFORNIA, ALL.BELTRAMINO, ALL.NURE, ERICA BELTRAMINO & STEFANO ODDENINO
HM JUNIOR CHAMPION: MULLER VICTOR IVOIRE, JEAN-BERNARD ET HÉLÈNE MÜLLER

CLASS 1 (9)

All-Cast Unix Amy
1st place Category 1
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Il Castagno – Franzetti – Alberto Locatelli

1. ALL-CAST UNIX AMY (UNIX), IL CASTAGNO – FRANZETTI – ALBERTO LOCATELLI
2. JD PASTESK (CADILLAC), JULIEN DANO
3. HAUTMONT HILL CRUSHTIME RIZIE (CRUSHTIME), HAUTMONT HILL
4. HAUTMONT HILL ARTIST MAKE IT (ARTIST), HAUTMONT HILL
5. STUDERAMA DOORMAN DOLLY (DOORMAN), STUDER ALFRED

CLASS 2 (26)

MIDALI Denver PROVIDENCE
1st place Category 2
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Gaec Butsch

1. MIDALI DENVER PROVIDENCE (DENVER), GAEC BUTSCH
2. BEL CRUSHTIME DEEJAY (CRUSHTIME), ALL.BELTRAMINO/BAG2/ALL.NURE/A.M.VOIGT
3. HAUTMONT HILL ARTIST TIE ONE ON (ARTIST), M. BURKHALTER, Y. & CH.SCHNEGG, Y. BÖGLI
4. STAUFFRED CRUSHTIME GONDOLE (CRUSHTIME), STAUFFRED HOLSTEIN
5. PREDELACHAUX SIDEKICK CORTINA (SIDEKICK), CPE URBEN & BUHLER URBN ALAIN

CLASS 3 (22)

PraderGrens Undenied SURRE
1st place Category 3
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Pradervand Cédric & Monique

1. PRADERGRENS UNDENIED SURREY (UNDENIED), PRADERVAND CÉDRIC & MONIQUE
2. RUEGRUET O KALIBER BELANA (O KALIBER), RÜTTIMANN ANDRÉ & PATRICK
3. HAUTMONT HILL PHARO PHANY (PHARO), HAUTMONT HILL
4. MATTENHOF ARTIST GIOVANNA (ARTIST), FANKHAUSER MARTIN / M+E JUNKER, ALL.NURE
5. LES PONTS ATWOOD ELISE (G W ATWOOD), DUMAS CLAUDE

CLASS 4 (18)

Bel Sidekick CALIFORnIA
1st place Category 4
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

All.Beltramino/All.Nure/Erica Beltramino/Stefano Oddenino

1. BEL SIDEKICK CALIFORNIA (SIDEKICK), ALL.BELTRAMINO/ALL.NURE/ERICA BELTRAMINO/STEFANO ODDENINO
2. MULLER VICTOR IVOIRE (VICTOR), MÜLLER JEAN-BERNARD ET HÉLÈNE
3. VITALI TOP TI SOLOMON NICE (SOLOMON), VITALI MATTIAS ET BARUFFILI MASSIMO
4. DU BON VENT ONKA (DENVER), GAEC DU BON VENT
5. PRADERGRENS CHIEF RITOURNELLE (CHIEF), PRADERVAND CÉDRIC & MONIQUE

 

Hautmont Hill Octane HIGH ESTIME
1st place Category 5
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Hautmont Hill

c

Bel Doorman CHINA
1st place Category 6
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Hullcrest Holsteins

c

Campgran KERINCY Deman
1st place Category 7
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

El Campgran

d

CLASS 8 (11)

H.Tobias Am Solomon ADENA
1st place Category 8
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Alberto Medina, Planillo & Huerta Los Tobias

1. H.TOBIAS AM SOLOMON ADENA (SOLOMON), ALBERTO MEDINA, PLANILLO & HUERTA LOS TOBIAS
2. JK EDER SOLOMON DARYL (SOLOMON), HAUTMONT HILL
3. JLD LILAC (CADILLAC), ELEVAGE LE BOIS BRILLANT / JLD GENETICS
4. CUDAÑA ALHAMBRA JACOBY (JACOBY), CUDAÑA HOLSTEIN
5. MILIBRO DOORMAN PANDORA (DOORMAN), GYGER RETO ET JONAS

CLASS 9 (7)

Longeraie Unix ELNA
1st place Category 9
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Tornare Nicolas

1. LONGERAIE UNIX ELNA (UNIX), TOMARE NICOLAS
2. MOLLANGES UNIX ATTITUDE (UNIX), HENCHOZ PASCAL
3. ROGY DEMPSEY NORWAY (DEMPSEY), GAEC ALPES HOLSTEIN
4. GOBELI’S SOLOMON PINK ROSE (SOLOMON), GOBELI HOLSTEIN
5. STUUMAN BEEMER ANDRINA (BEEMER), JUNKER MARC ET ETHARD

CLASS 10 (12)

Gobeli’s Mogul PASSOA
1st place Category 10
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Gobeli Holstein

1. GOBELI’S MOGUL PASSOA (MOGUL), GOBELI HOLSTEIN
2. BLONDIN BEEMER CAMOMILLE (BEEMER), MICHEL CLEMENT
3. S BRO DOORMAN ESPRIT (DOORMAN), VK HOLSTEIN MARKUS V.K/ FIRSTLOOK, WOODHEY, BLACKLABEL, SUMISWALD
4. GOBELI ATOMAR DELICIEUSE (ATOMAR), GOBELI HOLSTEIN
5. S BRO SUNLIGHT CHEEPY (SUNLIGHT), EDWIN STEINER

CLASS 11 (18)

Longeraie Unix DELTA
1st place Category 11
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Tornare Nicolas

1. LONGERAIE UNIX DELTA (UNIX), NICOLAS TOMARE
2. LES CHAUX SOLOMON TEQUILA (SOLOMON), PHARISA-JAQUET COMEX
3. ZAYANA (G W ATWOOD), MARKUS UND JOEL FRANKHAUSER
4. MORANDALE ATWOOD CARIE (G W ATWOOD), FRANCOIS MORAND
5. LES CHAUX SOLOMON ANKARA (SOLOMON), PHARISA-JAQUET COMEX

CLASS 12 (17)

Künzi’s Mccutchen LADInA
1st place Category 12
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Künzi Rolf

1. KUNZI’S MCCUTCHEN LADINA (MCCUTCHEN), KUNZI ROLF
2. BOURGO SOLOMON SUEDE (SOLOMON), JAQUET LAURENT ET JEAN-PHILIPPE
3. FARNEAR SAGARD NALA SG (SAGARD), GFELLER-ZAHLER MARIA ET WILLIAM
4. BIMOUNA GOLD CHIP MIELEUSE (GOLD CHIP), MARC & ERHARD JUNKER
5. DS NORTH (DOORMAN), II CASTAGNO-AGRIBER-MARCELLO LADINA, BRIGA NOVARESE

CLASS 13 (14)

Mattenhof Beemer GEORGIA
1st place Category 13
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Junker, Marc et Erhard

1. MATTENHOF BEEMER GEORGIA (BEEMER) MARC ET ERHARD JUNKER
2. MATTENHOF SOLOMON GEORGINA (SOLOMON), MARC ET ERHARD JUNKER
3. LLERA BYWAY LERELA (BYWAY), LLERA HER
4. GUDEL’S LEDUC LILI (LEDUC), BAUMGARTNER ISABELLE UND ADRIAN
5. GRATGERBER’S DIAMONDBACK CHEYENNE (DIAMONDBACK), GERBER WALTER

CLASS 14 (7)

Gobeli’s Durango PERRY
1st place Category 14
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Gobeli Holstein

1. GOBELI’S DURANGO PERRY (DURANGO), GOBELI HOLSTEIN
2. C P P HIGH OCTANE TCHOUPETTE (HIGH OCTAIN), CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION/OSCAR DUPASQUIER
3. LES ADOUX UNIX BEVERLY (UNIX), CHANERE CLAUDE
4. PTIT COEUR UNIX DARLINGA (UNIX), FROSSARD ROGER/YVES SAUCY
5. AGH LOLA (FITZ), ALL.BELTRAMINO/BAG2/FERME MOREL

CLASS 15 (17)

Comestar Doorman O’KATRYSHA
1st place Category 15
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

WTS-Genetics / Comestar Holsteins

1. COMESTAR DOORMAN O’KATRYSHA (DOORMAN), WTS-GENETICS & COMESTAR HOLSTEINS
2. S BRO GOLD CHIP ALEXIS (GOLD CHIP), EDWIN STEINER
3. MOLLANGES GOLD CHIP FRANCE (GOLD CHIP), PASCAL HENCHOZ
4. BLONDIN GOLDWYN ALINE-ET (GOLDWYN), GOBELI HOLSTEIN/BURKHARD/GLAUSER
5. BOTVILLA BOT ELUDE MITZY (ELUDE), GOBELI HOLSTEIN/GASSER/RAZ

CLASS 16 (10)

Petitclerc Archrival SALTA
1st place Category 16
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Edwin Steiner

1. PETITCLERC ARCHRIVAL SALTA (ARCHRIVAL), EDWIN STEINER
2. CASTEL CHIP CHRISTIE (GOLD CHIP), MARC ET ERHARD JUNKER & THOMAS STAUB
3. TEX MARITZA (ISITOLO), GAEC POM HOLSTEIN/REY HOLSTIENS
4. GYGERS BROKAW ALASKA (BROKAW), JOE DEMIERRE
5. MOWGLI DU TOMBUY (MESDOOR), FERME DU TOMBUY

CLASS 17 (19)

Riedill MELISSA (Merrick)
1st place Category 17
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Earl Wollenburger

1. RIEDILL MELISSA (MERRICK), EARL WOLLENBURGER
2. WILT ELAYA (FITZ), GAEC WILT
3. MENTHE DU NEUHOF (GOLDEN DREAMS), EARL ELEVAGE DU NEUHOF
4. JOLIFF ATWOOD BREE (ATWOOD), ELEVAGE LE BOIS BRILLANT/REY HOLSTEINS
5. SHO GODEWIND FRISCA (GODEWINGD), BURKLI UELI

CLASS 18 (18)

Sous Revers O Kaliber ODESSA
1st place Category 18
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Gratwohl Favre Florence Sébastien

1. SOUS REVERS O KALIBER ODESSA (O’KALIBER), GRATWOHL FAVRE FLORENCE SEBASTIEN
2. GOBELI’S ATWOOD ATRIANA (G W ATWOOD), GOBELI HOLSTEIN
3. GS ALLIANCE MARIO ENYA (MARIO), STEINER EDWIN
4. LA MONTAGNE COMMANDER ROXANE (COMMANDER), MAILLARD PIERRE-ALAIN & JEAN-PIERRE
5. WILT ELYANA (GOLDEN DREAMS), GUBELMANN PATRICK

CLASS 19 (9)

GOYA (O Kaliber)
1st place Category 19
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Steiner Edwin / Ferme la Waebera / All. Nure

1. GOYA (O’KALIBER), STEINER EDWIN/FERME LA WAEBERA
2. LA WAEBERA SID SUZIE (SID), CLEMENT MICHEL
3. C P P OBSERVER SATURNE (OBSERVER), CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION
4. GS ALLIANCE ATWOOD ELINA (G W ATWOOD), STEINER EDWIN/ALL. NURE, DE MICHELI PIETRO & MATTEO
5. SCHONHOF’S MEGASHOCK (AFTERSHOCK), SCHONHOF HOLSTEINS

CLASS 20 (14)

Sunibelle Dempsey ESPRIT
1st place Category 20
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Markus v.k / N.Sudan, G.Jones, P.Conroy,Agriber, Q. Serrabassa

1. SUNIBELLE DEMPSEY ESPRIT (DEMPSEY), MARKUS V.K/ N.SUDAN, G.JONES, P.CONROY, AGRIBER, Q.SERRABASSA
2. DU BON VENT JANNA CAMA (AFTERSHOCK), ELEVAGE LE BOIS BRILLANT/REY HOLSTEINS
3. CHOLLET-STAR GOLD CHIP VERONA (GOLD CHIP), GRATWOHL FAVRE FLORENCE SEBASTIEN/BACH LORENZ
4. DESGRANGES DUDE ARIZONA (DUDE), STAUFFRED HOLSTEIN
5.ILLENS O’GOLD DOLOMITES (O’GOLD), ROUILLER JACQUES

CLASS 21 (5)

IZELLA du Mezou (Dempsey)
1st place Category 21
2020 Swiss Expo Holstein Show

Elevage le Bois Brillant / Rey Holsteins / J. Bazaillacq

1. IZELLA DU MEZOU (DEMPSEY), ELEVAGE LE BOIS BRILLANT/REY HOLSTEINS/J. BAZAILLACQ
2. DU BON VENT INKAPI (BRAWLER), ALL.BELTRAMINO/BAG2/ALL.NURE/L.BACH/L.SARRERI
3. NOA IFTY (FEVER), PH DERU
4. PJP. INOUIE (MERIDIAN), STEINER EDWIN/RUEGRUET, PARRABEL GENETICS
5. GS ALLIANCE AFTERSHOCK ELENA, (AFTERSHOCK), HEINZER PETER/JASMIN KUCHLER & MARCLE GWERDER

CLASS 22 (6)

HANNA-VRAY (Atwood)
1st place Category 22
2020 Swiss Expo​ Holstein Show

Junker Marc et Erhard / Dupasquier Oscar + Eric

1. HANNA-VRAY (G W ATWOOD), JUNKER MARC ET ERHARD/DUPASQUIER OSCAR
2. HAENNI SID CALINE (SID), CLEMENT MICHEL
3. SCHONHOF’S SID MAILAND (SID), SCHONHOF HOLSTEIN
4. LONGERAIE WINDBROOK TANGA (WINDBROOK), TOMARE NICOLAS
5. NOVA DIABLESSE (EXTREM), PH DERU

CLASS 23 A (4)

Llinde ARIEL Jordan
1st place Category 23
2020 Swiss Expo​ Holstein Show

Sat Ceceño, 39528 Valdaliga

1. LINDE ARIEL JORDAN (JORDAN), SAT CECENO
2. MORANDALE AFTERSHOCK KINGSTONE (AFTERSHOCK), MORAND FRANCOIS
3. KOLLY-JI SEAVER LISABEL (SEAVER), FERME KOLLY-JI
4. VEG COLDAV FOLBREIZH (COLDAV), FABACEAE GENETIQUE/GAEC DE LA VILLE ES GENETS

CLASS 23 B (5)

Mapleyard Joyboy FLOWER
1st place Category 24
2020 Swiss Expo​ Holstein Show

Mapleyard Holstein

1. MAPLEYARD JOYBOY FLOWER (JOYBOY), MAPLEYARD HOLSTEIN
2. ONNLAND GOLDWYN HIRONDELLE (GOLDWYN), HOURIET GLADYS
3. OPPLIGER CHRISMAS BIANCA (CHRISMAS), HOURIET GLADYS
4. LA JOIE BACON BACINETTE (BACON), HOURIET GLADYS
5. SUNNY-PLACE JOURNALIST NUBYA (JOURNALIST), BIERI MATHIAS ET CLAUDE

Swiss Expo Red & White Holstein Show 2020

January 17, 2020 @ Geneva, Switzerland
Judge; Brian Carscadden

x

ZAIA (Absolute)
Grand Champion – 2020 Swiss Expo Red & White Show

Genoud Etienne et Anthony