Archive for January 2019

Improving Dairy Cow Feed Efficiency Begins with….

Frequently dairy producers are being encouraged to implement ways and means to improve the efficiency with which their cows and herds convert their feed into milk. For herd feeding and management, some solutions already exist yet for accurate genetic indexing the answers are yet to be found. The Bullvine has written about feed efficiency in the past (read more: Should You Breed for Feed Efficiency?, A Guide to Understanding How to Breed For Feed Efficiency and Fertility  and Feed Efficiency: The Money Saver), however, let’s further consider both the facts and the challenges.

The Growing Power of Small Wins

In the past 25 years, the matter of feed efficiency has gone from giving cows a “least cost” balanced diet and accepting the resulting milk production to monitoring both feed intake and milk production to arrive at maximum net profit per day.  Why? This is in a major part because the cost of production now, 50-60% of which is feed costs, is much higher relative to farm gate milk price than 25 years ago. Yes, the margins on dairy farms, the world over, are much narrower and the cost of feed is therefore under scrutiny. So even a slight gain of $0.25 to $0.50 on Income Over Feed Costs (IOFC) per cow per day can make the difference between a farm staying in business or exiting the industry. With most other items in the cost of producing milk increasing every year, it leaves feed cost as the target for change.

The challenge of cost savings is not the only matter producers face when it comes to feed.  Consumers want access to certifiable information on how the cows were fed to make the milk. Organic. Were human edible feedstuffs used? What ingredients were added? The list is expanding. Where producers once ignored customers questions on feedstuffs, there will need to be accurate records of feeds and feeding methods.

Past Progress Not a Stop Sign

Before we continue, it must be noted that US dairy farmers have put in place many improvements over the past seventy-five years. Comparing 1944 to today, cows produce much more milk per year (443%). As well as modern milk production requires 23% of the feed, 35% of the water and 10% of the land to produce a gallon of milk than was required in 1944. All impressive numbers.

The reality is, that like in many businesses, dairy farming will need to continue to operate on tight margins, all the time with more monitoring and the need to a guaranteed product.

Establishing Milestones to Feed Efficiency Improvement

There are two aspect to monitor feed efficiency – the herd and the cow.

  • Herd Analysis Through Data Collection
    Working with their nutritionist, dairy farmers can now monitor and specifically manage their herds, strings and pens for feed costs by recording feed inputs and milk output. There are programs that also consider the effects of a feeding program on udder health, fertility, animal health and more. For pasture-based herds, it is only the concentrates feed that can be closely monitored. My experience in working with dairy herd improvement clubs, producers can increase their income over feed costs anywhere from $0.50 to $2.00 per cow per day by fine-tuning both the nutrition program and the management program. $150 to $600 more net per cow per year – that’s well worth the extra work and effort.
  • Animal Analysis Through Genetic Ranking
    On the genetic side of the improvement equation, it is not possible to currently sort or rank animals for feed efficiency. It is costly to capture individual cow feed intake. The Bullvine article, “The Genetics of Feed Efficiency in Dairy – Where are we at?”, published in May 2018, covers in detail the current global studies to establish genetic ranks for sires and the approximations for Feed Efficiency sire rankings that A.I. organizations are currently producing.  As well, most national total merit indexes, including NM$, TPI, LPI and ProS, include in their formulae a discounting factor for cow maintenance. This is an attempt to, for equal production performance, reward smaller to moderate-sized cows relative to larger cows. It is noteworthy that LPI considers Dairy Strength, an approximation of size, as a positive in its formula not a negative. Within, especially the Holstein breed, there is a   trend around the world to favouring moderate stature and medium-sized cows.
    Achieving national sire genetic rankings, for all proven sires based on 100+ daughters for Feed Efficiency, are years away due to the cost of data capture and the variation in data capture systems. At the present time, some breeding companies (A.I.) and an increasing number of precision dairy companies are extensively studying the capture of individual cow feed intakes and matching that with production performance and genomic information. They will be producing genomic indexes for feed efficiency. Within a few years, breeders can expect to see company genomic indexes for feed efficiency in the 55-70% reliability range.
    USDA (Beltsville) researchers have studied heifer and milking cow feed efficiency and found that on a genetic basis for equivalent performance $0.21/day can be saved in heifer feeding costs and $0.23/day can be saved in cow feeding costs. The number of animals in the study are limited but it does give hope to having genetic indexes for animals in their ability to convert feed to meat or milk. The USDA numbers are in the same range as feed cost savings published in literature explaining STgen’s EcoFeed® sire ratings. In time dairy managers will be able to choose between sires of equal genetic merit for production where one sires whose daughters cost $0.20 more or less in feed costs per day.

Start by Improving Selection Criteria  

At the herd, string and pen level dairy managers need to work with their nutritional staff or advisors to routinely record feed inputs and milk production. Then calculate the Income Over Feed Costs. Always keep in mind that the Income Over feed Costs number is not the total answer as animal health and fertility are very important for a dairy farm to be successful.

At the sire selection level, dairy managers should consider the feed efficiency values that are published by A.I. As mentioned above, many national total merit indexes already factor in the cost associated with cow maintenance. As yet, the reliabilities for feed efficiency genetic ratings are only in the 45-55% range but they are a good start. Expect within a few years to see genomic sire and heifer indexes for feed efficiency. Our best advice, at this time, is to use the published feed efficiency numbers for animals as a supplementary piece of information. Total merit, production, health and fertility genetic indexes should remain the primary sire selection criteria.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

Feed conversion efficiency is important now. It will be even more important in the future.  Dairymen need to record feed intake and using it for herd feeding and management purposes.  As sire genetic indexes for daughter feed efficiency become available to eliminate the use of sires that do not rank in the top 25% for feed efficiency.

 

 

 

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Forget the past, dairy cows in the future will look very different…or will they?

Often a story begins with looking back-back to the good old days. Have you recently heard a dairy cattle breeder speak or write about how cows used to last until they were ten years old and that today cows are one lactation wonders? Should Bullvine readers accept this perception as fact? Especially knowing that breeding dairy cattle is about creating a superior cow for the future? Let’s think this one through.

Unique Comparison to 1960

Holsteins with the genetic merit of the 1960s have been maintained for study and comparison purposes at a University of Minnesota research station.  The photo below shows the physical appearance of cows from back then.

This cow from the U of M Morris Research Dairy is a living representation of genetics from the 1960s.

Compared to present day US Holsteins the cows from the 1960s were shorter, beefier, had udders that deepened quickly with age and they produced half as much milk (35 pounds per day from first calving to herd removal). Heifers calved for the first time at 27-28 months of age and a significant percentage of first calvers were culled after difficult calving or for low production or physical problems including undesirable udders. Also, twice as many calves died before weaning as happens today. By comparison to today, there were fewer genetic indexes and they were less accurate. The theory of comparisons that utilized BLUP had yet to be developed by Dr Charlie Henderson at Cornell.

The fact is those good old days of the 1960s were not actually that great. Breeders lamenting for those years are selectively remembering that only the top 10-20% of first lactation Holsteins excelled and those breeders are not remembering that 20-30% of cows one month into their first lactation had health issues, low milk, low-fat test, deep udders or weak median suspensory ligaments.  Over half the first lactation cows classified Good or lower in Canada in 1965.  Breeders thought in terms of their best animals and not what their herd average was.

Globalization of Single Purpose Dairy Cows Has Occurred

It is not just in North America where the dairy cow has changed.  Dual purpose cows have gone by the way and single purpose dairy cows have become the desired milk cows in “dairy” countries.

The picture below of the President of the German Holstein Association holding two cow models shows how fifty years of selective breeding has changed German Holsteins.

The next two pictures are pictures I took of a prize winner and a class line-up at the 1976 World Holstein-Friesian Conference Show held at Stoneleigh England. ‘Holsteinization’ of the Black and Whites were just underway in 1976 in the UK and the judge at that show was still looking for the dual-purpose cow.

Other breeds have also experienced significant changes in the ideal conformation of their cows.

The Present-Day Mature Cow

Below is a barn shot of a ten-year-old Holstein cow that checks many boxes for today’s dairy cattle breeders.

  Riverdown Baxter Marina,  VG-2yr/5E,   7 lactations  97,512 kgs 4.3%F 3.4%P
                    (Sire Stack – Baxter x Goldwyn x Lee x Lindy x Prelude x Inspiration)

Marina first calved at 2-02 and in the next eight and a half years (3060 days) of her life, she averaged 70 lbs. of milk per day. That’s 70 lbs. for every day – milking days plus dry days. It is interesting to note that Marina was just slightly above the average milk yield to her herdmates throughout her productive life while excelling in fat % and protein %.

As a young cow Marina ranked top 10% for her genetic indexes, however, today she falls to the top 50% level, due mainly to the very rapid genetic improvement that the Holstein breed has made in the past decade. As ever, time marches on.

In today’s purebred dairy breeder circles, much discussion can be heard on whether the ideal cow is the great old cow, like Marina, or the productive, low maintenance first to third lactation cow. However, it is A.I. studs and their commercial dairy breeder customers that are now driving the overall genetic progress and for which traits. But that is in 2019 terms. What about the ideal dairy cow for the future?

Tomorrow’s Cow

In a recent Milk House post about the cow of the future, which was commented on by almost sixty group members, there was equal support for wanting cows to remain much as they currently are and for wanting cows to be more – more functional, fertile, healthy, efficient converters and to be evaluated on a daily net profit basis. So, that would appear to say in breeders’ mind that the jury is still out on future selection criteria for both sires and cows. However, as dairy farming continues to evolve into a finer and finer tuned business with average herds size, in the US, moving towards 500 milking cows we can expect significant changes in the traits breeders include in their animal selection programs.

The first question that traditional breeders will ask about the cow of the future is – ‘What will the cow of the future look like?” The Bullvine sees that body form will not be as important as it has been in the past for purebred breeders. Breeders have enhanced the body form of dairy cattle as much as is possible using visual evaluation. In the future, it will be body part functions that will determine the body form for commercial cows. So, breed ideal or true type models will not be used by over 95% of future herd owners, as each owner will have their own ideal.  Final score and body parts genetic indexes will not be used. And descriptive scoring will be the primary conformation indexes (udder depth, teat placement, legs rear view, thurl width and hoof form) used in sire selection and mating programs. It is entirely possible that the conformation data will be captured using photo imaging. (Read more: Are You Breeding for the Correct Conformation to Produce the Greatest Lifetime Profit?, Does The Current Conformation Evaluation System Work for Commercial Breeders? and She Ain’t Pretty – She Just Milks That Way!)

Dr Jack Britt, Professor Emeritus, North Carolina State University along with a group of associate researchers and ag extension specialists have done extensive work on predicting what the dairy industry, globally but primarily in the US, will be like 50 years from now. Dr Britt has presented the group’s predictions many times over the past two years, including at the 2018 World Dairy Expo in Madison Wisconsin. They are predicting that in twenty years US cows will average over 40,000 lbs. milk per year and in fifty years over 55,000 lbs.  One slide from his presentation is shown below for traits and processes that will be commonplace.

– Future Dairy Cow Selection Criteria and Processes as seen by Dr Jack H Britt

Dr Britt has other slides that show: 1) that seven countries (US, India, China, Brazil, Germany, Russia and France) produce 50% of the global milk and twenty countries produce 75%; 2) that with global warming dairy cows will change from an animal that functions best in temperate climates to be heat tolerant; 3) that increased technology and epigenetics will be commonplace; and 4) that there will be enhanced ways of feeding the rumen microbes.

The fact is that dairy farming, including the genetic side, will undergo major changes in the next ten, twenty and fifty years

The Bullvine Bottom Line

For sure yesterday’s cows got us here… Definitely, tomorrow’s cows will be different.

In the future cows will function trouble free for many years in large groups on automated farms. They will live in a multitude of environments and will need to be able to produce a high volume of milk solids. They will efficiently covert non-human food to milk. And genetic selection will turn on net returns over a lifetime and how body parts function most effectively.

 

 

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Ferme Jacobs – “Dreams without goals are just….dreams”

It’s so hard to focus on the victories with Ferme Jacobs, because the way it wins is so well, winsome.

Just one other Canadian farm has won Premier Breeder at The Royal more times than Ferme Jacobs (Romandale Holsteins, 13 times). Notably, at The Royal, Ferme Jacobs showed no heifers and they have now nudged ahead of household names like Dupasquier Holsteins, Hanover Hill Holsteins, Glenafton Holsteins and Rosafe Holsteins.

And the last time a Holstein breeder won Grand and Reserve Grand Champion with homebred entries at The Royal was Agro Acres with maternal sisters in 1969. Before that the only other recorded time was by Mount Victoria in 1935.

The landslide results for Ferme Jacobs started here when The Royal judge Jamie Black slapped the family’s winning four-year-old, Jacobs Windbrook Aimo EX95 for Senior Champion.

This year’s Royal Agricultural Winter Fair belonged to Ferme Jacobs’ winning four-year-old, Jacobs Windbrook Aimo EX95, and their winning mature cow, Jacobs Lauthority Loana EX96-2E, who finished Grand and Reserve Grand Holstein respectively. Loana is owned in partnership with Pat Conroy.

And yet the lasting impressions from both WDE and The Royal are not only the family’s champions, but also the way they care for their cows, the way they celebrate and the way they share their success with the industry.

The squeals and multiple photographs of their children swarming ringside, together with the unadulterated joy between their parents in the ring, is infectious.

“We always have a party, even if we lose,” Ysabel Jacobs, 37, smiled.

“But that party at The Royal this year was one of the best ones we’ve had, for sure. We were so excited. We’ve never had Grand and Reserve Grand before, so we went wild.

“Because the level where we are now with our results; it’s easier to get there than it is to stay there. We know that.

“Last year we said we couldn’t have a better year than that was. Then this year, we did. We don’t know what’s coming up for us. But we know we are going to have to accept it when it comes, because we have kids around and we need to show them the right way to handle losing.”

The family was also unafraid to bring the reigning WDE Grand Champion Holstein out again at The Royal one month later – always a risk when a cow has something to lose.

WDE and Royal wins both special

“I think both the WDE and RWF results were special in their own way,” Ysabel said. “At WDE, Loana was perfect, and while Aimo [the 2017 WDE Intermediate Champion] won her class at WDE this year, she didn’t co-operate with us that day, and we had wanted her to look better than she did.

“At the RWF, it was the opposite. Aimo got ready perfect, and Loana didn’t want to co-operate. When we get our cows ready in the string, we get all excited before they leave the string if they are heading to the ring looking as good as we know they can be. After that, whatever happens in the ring is fine because you have no control over that.

“We think Loana might have had a big heat the day before the RWF because she was very mad that day. So, one show was perfect for Loana, and one was perfect for Aimo. We’re happy with that.”

As to which cow is best, Ysabel smiles. She always leads Loana and Yan takes Aimo.

“I don’t know,” she laughed. “If you talk to my brother he’ll say Aimo, and if you talk to me, I think I’d say Loana. There are some things that I like more about Loana and some things I like more about Aimo.

“We both like to lead, and we kind of always have our own cows. We never fight for who leads who, because we always differ slightly. We like the same kind of cow, but we like different things on individuals too. I would say Aimo is more Yan’s type, and Loana is more my type.”

Carl Saucier mentor

Semex’s well-known Carl Saucier, who has been a mentor and friend for Yan and Isobel, says there is something special about the family’s care of their cows, which always comes before winning.

“What I love about this family is that they are not only humble winners, they are great losers,” Carl said.

“I remember in 2015 at The Royal, they lost the Premier Breeder banner by the smallest of margins and they went down to Kingsway [Farms, the winner] and drank to their success with them. They are always happy for others. Ysabel is happy to help others at shows too – even her biggest competitors. She’ll give them some of their best hay to fill cows on show day. She just smiles and says: ‘Let the best cow win.’”

Buy when they want to

While the family is now recognised for its success with homebred animals, buying them is not without precedence. This year’s WDE Intermediate Champion, Erbacres Snapple Shakira-ET VG89, is jointly owned by Ferme Jacobs, Ty-D Holsteins, Killian Tehraulaz, Ferme Antelimarck and C & F Jacobs. The 2013 WDE Supreme Champion Bonnacueil Maya Goldwyn EX-95 3E 6* was co-owned with Drolet & Fils, Ty-D Holsteins, and Bonaccueil Holsteins.

Erbacres Snapple Shakira-ET VG89, gets the nod for Intermediate Champion at World Dairy Expo. She is jointly owned by Ferme Jacobs, Ty-D Holsteins, Killian Tehraulaz, Ferme Antelimarck and C & F Jacobs. She is led by Tyler Doiron.

“We do like to buy one once in a while and develop a cow to the max she can be,” Ysabel said. “But we’re never in a rush to buy them. It just happens when, ‘OK, I can’t get over it’. Then we get on each other. If I go to sleep at night and I still see her in my head, we need to buy her. We’re like kids and it’s satisfying to get a cow where you know she can be. With Shakira, it just happened that our friend, Killian, was there when we were looking at her, and he said he wanted in too.

“I think the partnerships we have now is that they know us. They know that we’re not going to call for a breeding decision. But they know also that we’ll make the best decisions we can on the cow’s behalf.

“If someone wants to be in with us, they need to just let us get on with it. We’re very bad for sharing news – very bad. We don’t spend all our time talking with a partner on the phone. They need to have trust in us and as soon as we flush, we usually separate everything so the partnerships don’t get too big. That’s the easiest way.”

Breeding with numbers often doesn’t add up 

When Ferme Jacobs decides on what bulls to use to breed the next one, genomics is the last consideration. The family is driven by cow families and the sires that leave the kind of cows the farm needs. They have alternated between high type and breeding for milk. It maintains a balance of stylish show cows that will work and last.

“We do look at the numbers, but that’s not big for us,” Ysabel said. “The only number we really do watch is that we will never use a bull that is minus for milk. Yan is starting to judge more now. He went to the USA, and Tyler and I are also starting to judge too, so we are all travelling a little bit.

“Between us, we see enough cattle in a year that we can see which bulls we want to use, and which bulls we don’t wanna use. When we go away, we usually also try and visit two to three farms to see what’s there and what’s working.

“Right now, we’re breeding for a bit more on milk, because you can have any good show cow in the world, if she doesn’t milk it’s not going to work.

“We are concentrating right now on balance, especially at our place because we have so many type cows. Using high type bulls here right now would be too extreme.”

Bulls in use now include Croteau Lesperron Unix, Seagull-Bay Silver, Comestar Lautrust, S-S-I Silver Spike, Sandy-Valley J Pharo, S-S-I Montross Missle, Monument Impression, and MR Mogul Delta.

“I know sometimes we use older bulls, but we don’t think using old bulls is a fault,” Ysabel said. 

Massive embryo demand

Their juggle remains working between showing cows, massive embryo demand (500 embryos were sold by Ferme Jacobs this year), and breeding a bull for the industry, to be marketed through Select Sires.

MOET embryo transfer work takes a seat behind show cow management and preparation. IVF is infrequent, because of the expense.

“If the cows are on a show programme, they are not going to be flushed,” Ysabel said. “We don’t want to work with hormones while they are showing. We’d rather flush them when they are done showing.”

And the Jacobs family remains true to itself when it comes to choosing potential bull mothers.

“Select [Sires] are not pushing us for the cross, because they know there are some crosses we don’t want and some crosses that make sense to us,” Ysabel said.

“It doesn’t have to be very high on everything, because we think that everyone in the industry is running a race right now on all that… for nothing.”

The cows they hope to make a bull from include 2017 Holstein Canada Cow of the Year, Jacobs Goldwyn Britany EX-96 2E 10* (Braedale Goldwyn x Jacobs Jasper Best), Loana (Comestar Lauthority x Jacobs Outside Linsey), Aimo (Windbrook x Jacobs Minister Aima), and Shikara (Snapple x Miss Apple Snapple EX-94). Aimo has an ET bull calf coming, sired by Lautrust, and she will calve next May to Lautrust.

The family’s happy place

Challenges come to every family and Ysabel says it is always the cows that put them back in their “happy place”. An extended and supportive team, combined with watching their children develop the same love for cattle, has sustained them.

“It’s not easy, because there is sacrifice. But it is a sacrifice my brother, my husband and I don’t mind,” Ysabel said.

Yan Jacobs is swamped by his daughters Elsie and Nellie Jacobs as he leaves the ring after winning Grand Champion at The Royal. Tyler and Ysabel’s daughter Aylson is obscured.

 “Our kids have grown up around that. We have three farms together and we have an amazing team around us, including Mum and Dad, who always support us.

“Yes, it’s hard sometimes and sometimes you want to quit. But there is always something coming and someone slapping your shoulder, or you find a new cow and you get excited again.”

Pressure has been a constant, but they can now put it into perspective.

“I would say that two years ago we could feel there was pressure to back up our performance,” Ysabel said. “But last year, we realised there is so much more important things in life than showing, and this year we just wanted to go and have fun, and to try our best.

“We get nervous at certain points, but always a good nervous. I know there is money involved. But people are so much looking at us right now, that no matter what happens, we should do it for fun.

“We’ve lost before, and we’ll lose again. Let’s be prepared to do it, and if it happens, at least we had fun doing it. Our kids are starting to show and we are trying to teach them the right way, because they don’t always lead winners – they lead both. And, if they don’t practice with their calves at home, we aren’t going to let them show their calf.”

Ultimately, Ferme Jacobs loves good cows and they continue to see the good, and the good people in the industry.

“We have people in our team who come and help us on show day, who don’t want to be paid. They just want to do it with us. Those are special people for us,” Ysabel said.

“We are very lucky to have them around us. To be honest, there are so many good people in our business who have the same passion to try to get the right cow where she needs to be. We love it.”

 

 

Swiss Expo Holstein Show 2019

Location: Lausanne, Switzerland
Judge: Pascal Henchoz (Switzerland)

Sunibelle Dempsey Esprit
Grand Champion – 2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Von Kanel, Sudan, Jones, Conroy

Grand Champion: Sunibelle Dempsey ESPRIT à Von Känel Markus & N. Sudan, G. Jones, P. Conroy, 3454 Sumiswald
Réserve : GOYA à S Bro Holsteins & Ferme La Waebera, 8832 Wilen b. Wollerau
Mention : Du Rahun Chelios HELINE à Junker Marc et Erhard & AL.BE.RO-Staub, 3305 Iffwill 

Du Rahun Chelios Heline
Grand Champion Udder
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Erhard, Al.Be.Ro

Grand Champion Udder: Du Rahun Chelios HELINE à Junker Marc et Erhard & AL.BE.RO-Staub, 3305 Iffwill
Réserve : Sunibelle Dempsey ESPRIT à Von Känel Markus & N. Sudan, G. Jones, P. Conroy, 3454 Sumiswald

SHo Godewind Frisca
Intermediate Champion – 2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Ueli Nurkli

Intermediate Champion: SHo Godewind FRISCA à Bürkli Ueli, 5630 Muri AG
Réserve : Sous Revers O Kaliber ODESSA à Sébastien Favre & Florence Gratwohl, 1660 Les Moulins
Mention : C P P High Octane TCHOUPETTE à Currat Papaux Association, 1697 Les Ecasseys

Bel Fry Belaria
Junior Champion – 2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Beltrimino & Girard

JUNIOR CHAMPION: BEL FRY BELARIA (FRY), BELTRAMINO HOLSTEINS & DANIEL GIRARD, IT/CH
RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION: BELSOLOMON CRI (SOLOMON), BELTRAMINO & HULLCREST HOLSTEINS
HONOURABLE MENTION: PETIT SUISSE KINGBOY WINNIE-WHITE (KINGBOY), FRANZ SALZMANN, CH

CLASS 1 – 1ST MAY – 30TH JUNE 2018 (15)

Petit Bulsse Kingboy Winnie-White
1st place Class 1
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Franze Salzmann

1. PETIT SUISSE KINGBOY WINNIE-WHITE (KINGBOY), FRANZ SALZMANN, CH
2. HEKALU UNIX TWIZZLE (UNIX), BG HERREN-KRAMER, CH
3. BOPI UNI PIOLINA (UNIX), OBERSON-PASQUIER ASSOCIATION, CH
4. LA COUTAZ SOLOMON RUBY (SOLOMAN), RAPHAEL & FABIEN CONUS, CH
5. OPTIC (SOLOMON), EARL DE KERROC’H, FR
6. DESPEUPLIERS INCREDIBULL ALESIA (INCREDIBULL), LAURENT & BENJAMIN BORIOLI, CH
7. STAUFFRED SOLOMON GALANDE (SOLOMON), STAUFFRED HOLSTEIN, CH
8. BOPI UNIX PIOLINA (UNIX), OBERSON-PASQUIER ASSOCIATION, CH
9. BOSSRED’V BOOM RIVALE (BOOM), VINCENT BOSS, CH
10. OTTAWA BB (MCCUTCHEN), GAEC BESSON, FR

CLASS 2, 1ST MARCH – 30TH APRIL 2018 (21)

Bel Bag2 Chief Camilla
1st place Class 2
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Beltamino, Hullcrest

1. BEL BAG2 CHIEF CAMILLA (CHIEF), BELTRAMINO & HULLCREST HOLSTEINS, IT/NL
2. LLERA MCCUTCHEN BELUNTINA (MCCUTCHEN), HER LLERA, ESP
3. HAUTMONT HILL HIGH OCTANE LUMA (HIGH OCTANE), HAUTMONT HILL HOLSTEINS, BEL
4. STUDERAMA DIAMONDBACK DORINA (DIAMONDBACK), ALFRED STUDER, CH
5. DU LOUVION OBELLULE (CAPTURE), EARL LEPOINT, FR
6. SUPREME HIGH OCTANE ARNIKA (HIGH OCTANE), PATRICK DEMONT, CH
7. LA COUTAZ UNIX SHANGHAI (UNIX), RAPHAEL & FABIEN CONUS, CH
8. DROGNENS CHIEF LOUTRE (CHIEF), N ROCH, C RICHOZ, M MEUVLY, CH
9. MAGNOLIA GOLD CHIP CAROLINA (GOLD CHIP), AZ AG LA MAGNOLIA DI BALMA, IT
10. BOSSRED’V UNIX WENDY (UNIX), VINCENT BOSS & GUILLAUME ZWAHLEN, CH

CLASS 3 – 1ST JANUARY – 28TH FEBRUARY 2018 (32)

Bel Solomon Cri
1st place Class 3
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Beltamino, Hullcrest

1. BELSOLOMON CRI (SOLOMON), BELTRAMINO & HULLCREST HOLSTEINS
2. PRAZ-LINLIA DOORMAN ROCKSTAR (DOORMAN), PATRICE & THIERRY PAPAUX, CH
3. H TOBIAS SOLOMON AM ADENA (SOLOMON), ALBERTO MEDINO, HUERTA LOS TOBIAS & PLANILLO HOLSTEINS, ESP
4. GOBELI’S SOLOMON PINK ROSE (SOLOMON), GOBELI HOLSTEINS, CH
5. FRANZ SID SHARA (SID), FRANZETTI F.LLI, CFM, SIGESPROV, IT
6. MONNY CHIEF MOONLIGHT (CHIEF), CHRISTIAN & HERVE MONNEY, CH
7. GRANDS-BOIS GOLDEN DREAMS TIGRESSE (GOLDEN DREAMS), KOLLY PHARISA, FERME DES GRANDS BOIS, FR
8. BURKLI-HOLST CHIEF CITRONNE (CHIEF), UELI BURKLI, CH
9. VANHATALON CONTROL BELLA-CHARITY (CONTROL), VANHATALO HOLSTEINS, CH
10. HEKALU DOORMAN TABASCO (DOORMAN), BG HERREN-KRAMER, CH

CLASS 4 – 1ST NOVEMBER – 31ST DECEMBER 2017 (21)

Chetelat Chief Riley
1st place Class 4
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Patrick Chetelat

1. CHETELAT CHIEF RILEY (CHIEF), PATRICK CHETELAT, CH
2. S BROSUNLIGHT CHEEPY (SUNLIGHT), EDWIN STEINER, CH
3. MAGNOLIA PORTEA CAPITAL GAIN TECLY (CAPITAL GAIN), AZ AG LA MAGNOLIA DI BALMA & TJR PORTEA, IT
4. MILIBRO DOORMAN PANDORA (DOORMAN), RETO GYGER, CH
5. S BRO DOORMAN ESPIRIT (DOORMAN), FIRSTLOOK GENETICS, WOODHEY & BLACK LABEL HOLSTEINS, UK
6. KATRYSHA (SOLOMON), SCHAUTEAM BURGI, CH
7. NEGRITA DU NEUHOF (SOLOMON), GAEC GUTZWILLER, CH
8. BAROCHE UNIX ASPEGIC (UNIX), PASCAL & PIERRE YVES BARBEY, CH
9. FLO MCCUTCHEN MARY (MCCUTCHEN), FLORIAN OBERSON, CH
10. EM MARTHA (DIAMONDBACK), FERME MOREL & ETIENNE MOREL, FR

CLASS 5 – 1ST AUGUST – 31ST OCTOBER 2017 (27)

C.M.E. Defiant Semmy
1st place Class 5
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
La Magnolia di Balma, Errara Holsteins

1. CME DEFIANT SEMMY RC (DEFIANT), AZ AG LA MAGNOLIA DI BALMA & ERRERA HOLSTEINS, IT
2. LA BIOLLEYRE UPRIGHT PANACOTTA (UPRIGHT, BENOIT CARDINAUX, CH
3. MAGNOLIA ATWOOD PANTERA (ATWOOD), WILLIAM ZAHLER, CH
4. GOBELI’S DIAMONDBACK ANOUK (DIAMONDBACK), GOBELI HOLSTEINS, CH
5. CUDANA AZALEA SOLOMON (SOLOMON), CUDANA HOLSTEIN, CH
6. LBB NINA (SOLOMON), ELEVAGE LE BOIS BRILLIANT, TONY MALFATY & EARL BENAITRAU, FR
7. JACOBS GOLD CHIP NEVADA (GOLD CHIP), JONAS ZURCHER, CH
8. NOBLESSE BB (GOLD CHIP), GAEC BESSON, CH
9. HEKALU DIAMONDBACK RIHANNA (DIAMONDBACK), BG HERREN-KRAMER, CH
10. HTH JENTILLESSE (DOORMAN), THEIN HOLSTEINS, LUX

CLASS 6 – 1ST MAY – 31ST JULY 2017 (10)

Supreme Mario Vogue
1st place Class 6
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Patrick Demont

1. SUPREME MARIO VOGUE (MARIO), PATRICK DEMONT, CH
2. CUDANA ARENETA JACOBY (JACOBY), CUDANA HOLSTEIN, ESP
3. NAPAGE (JACQUIN DI), EARL DE KERROC’H, FR
4. DS NORTH (DOORMAN), IL CASTAGNO DI PASTORE, AGRIBER & MARCELLO LADINA, IT
5. HAUTMONT HILL BEEMER SAPHIR (BEEMER), HAUTMONT HILL HOLSTEIN, BEL
6. HAUTMONT HILL DELTA DELIA (DELTA), HAUTMONT HILL HOLSTEINS, BEL
7. NOVA NUDELL (BLAKE), NOVALAIT, FR
8. HMP MARIO NALA, (MARIO QUAL), GAEC HOFFSTETTER, FR
9. DEBORA (BREKEM), PATRIK PEREIRA & ASS, CH
10. TERREAUX DOORMAN IMAGE (DOORMAN), WILFRED & DAVID HABEGGER, CH

CLASS 7 – 1ST SEPTEMBER – 30TH APRIL 2017 (6)

Bel Fry Belaria
1st place Class 7
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Beltrimino & Girard

1. BEL FRY BELARIA (FRY), BELTRAMINO HOLSTEINS & DANIEL GIRARD, IT/CH
2. FANKIS BUBU AISHA (BUBU), MARTIN FANKHAUSER, CH
3. MAJORIC DOORMAN SUPRA (DOORMAN), MAJORIC HOLSTEIN, CH
4. MAGNOLIA FONTAINE BISTECCA (FONTAINE), AZ AG LA MAGNOLIA DI BALMA, IT
5. LE PAIGRE SOLOMON LIVIA (SOLOMON), THIERRY JUILLERAT
6. CHETELAT GOLD CHIP STYLEE (GOLD CHIP), PATRICK CHETELAT, CH

CLASS 8 – COWS BORN 1ST NOVEMBER 2016 – 31ST JANUARY 2017 (12)

C P P High Octane TCHOUPETTE
1st place Class 8
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Currat Papaux Assoc.

1. C P P HIGH OCTANE TCHOUPETTE (HIGH OCTANE), CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION, CH
2. AGH LOLA (FITZ), BELTRAMINO, BAG2 & MARCELLO LADINA, IT
3. PTIT COEUR UNIX DARLINGA (UNIX), ROGER FROSSARD & YVES SAUCY, CH
4. GOBELI’S DOORMAN EPONA (DOORMAN), GOBELI HOLSTEIN, CH
5. C P P OBSERVER VABIOLA (OBSERVER) CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION, CH
6. HELLENDER UNIX GRANCIA (UNIX), ANDREAS & THOMAS ENDER, CH
7. PRADERGRENS KINGBOY OPERA (KINGBOY), CEDERIC & MONIQUE PRADERVAND-REY
8. NEWFIELD GOLD CHIP NIRVANA (GOLD CHIP), MARC & ERHARD JUNKER, CH
9. NOVA MIFTY (GOLD CHIP), NAVALAIT, FR
10. S BRO DEMPSEY DANCY (DEMPSEY), EDWIN STEINER, CH

CLASS 9 – COWS BORN 1ST SEPTEMBER – 31ST OCTOBER 2016 (12)

NOVA MIFONA
1st place Class 9
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Novalait

1. NOVA MIFONA (EXTREM), NOVALAIT, FR
2. COMESTAR DOORMAN O’KATRYSHA (DOORMAN), KURT WILLMANN, WTS-GENETICS, CH
3. DESGRANGES JEDI ALISSON (JEDI), STAUFFRED HOLSTEIN, CH
4. C P P HIGH OCTANE TRIOMPHE (HIGH OCTANE), PILLER HOLSTEINS, CH
5. HELLENDER TONKA GALEJA (TONKA), ANDREAS & THOMAS ENDER, CH
6. PTIT COEUR CHIP LASVEGAS (GOLD CHIP), ROGER FROSSARD, CH
7. DU LOUVION MODESTY (IMOLA), EARL LEPOINT, FR
8. TESS, ARMIN SCHATT & ANNA-LOUISE STRODTHOFF-SCHNEIDER, CH
9. JACOBS SID ETAMINE (SID), STAUFFRED HOLSTEIN, CH
10. LES PONTS BRASH FANTAISY (BRASH), CLAUDE DUMAS, CH

CLASS 10 – COWS BORN 1ST JULY – 31ST AUGUST 2016 (13)

Petitclearc Archrival Salta
1st place Class 10
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Edwin Steiner

1. PETITCLERC ARCHRIVAL SALTA (ARCHRIVAL), EDWIN STEINER, CH
2. PTIT COEUR SILVER MILVENA (SILVER), ROGER FROSSARD, CH
3. ECLIPSE DU NEUHOF (GOLDEN DREAMS), JEAN & STEVEN SIEGNETHALER, CH
4. KOLLY-JL BRADY ANTALYA (BRADY), FERME KOLLY-JI, CH
5. SCHURTIS AWESOME DILEMMA (AWESOME), MARKUS VON KANEL, BG HERRON & SCHURTENBERGER, CH
6. MAJORIC DOORMAN ULANIA (DOORMAN), MAJORIC HOLSTEINS, CH
7. GYGERS BROKAW ALASKA (BROKAW), RETO GYGER, CH
8. LLINDE DUNALI BEEMER (BEEMER), SAT CECENO, CH
9. CPP GOLD CHIP TUNISIA (GOLD CHIP), CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION, CH
10. S BRO ARTEMIS O’KEANA (ARTEMIS), EDWIN STEINER, CH

CLASS 11 – COWS BORN 1ST FEBRUARY – 30TH JUNE 2016 (16)

Scieme-Yaux Brokaw Lanterne
1st place Class 11
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Favr & Gratwolh

1. SCIERNE-YAUX BROKAW LANTERNE (BROKAW), SEBASTIEN FAVRE & FLORENCE GRATWOHL, CH
2. SUPREME CHIP THE TEAM (GOLD CHIP), PATRICK DEMONT, CH
3. WILT ELAYA (FITZ), GAEC WILT, FR
4. C P P ATWOOD TALASSA (ATWOOD), PILLER HOLSTEIN, CH
5. MENTHE DU NEUHOF (DURANGO), GAEC GUTZWILLER, CH
6. PRINZ ADEENA (IMOLA), EARL PRINZ, FR
7. VILLARET WYMAN HARINA (WYMAN), FERME KOLLY-JI, CH
8. BURKLI-HOLST CIVIL MAXIMA (CIVIL), LOUC DEVAUD, CH
9. MADISON DU TOMBUY (DOORMAN), FERME DU TOMBUY, CH BURTEAUX, FERME DERRIERE LA TOUR, FR
10. SUPREME ATWOOD TIRAMISU (ATWOOD), PATRICK DEMONT, CH

CLASS 12 – COWS BORN 1ST OCTOBER – 31ST JANUARY 2016 (15)

SHo Godewind Frisca
1st place Class 12
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Ueli Nurkli

1. SHO GODEWIND FRISCA (GODEWIND), UELI BURKLI, CH
2. PTIT COEUR HIGH OCTANE MALONE (OCTANE), ROGER FROSSARD, CH
3. PTIT COEUR HIGH OCTA MOIKANA (OCTANE), MENOUD RED FABRICE, CH
4. C P P ATWOOD SOPHIA (ATWOOD), CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION, CH
5. LES ATLANTIS MCCUTCHEN MAJORQUE (MCCUTCHEN), KURT WILLMAN, WTS-GENETICS, CH
6. Z’HOLSTAR HIGH OCTANE DJ BIANCA (HIGH OCTANE),
7. LES PRALIES ARMANI LISETTE (ARMANI), PASCAL MENOUD, CH
8. DROGNENS MCCUTCHEN ILLUSION (MCCUTCHEN), FREDERIC SUARD, CH
9. ILLENS UNIX ECLETTICA (UNIX), JACQUES ROUILLER, CH
10. GERMAIN CHIP ANGEL (GOLD CHIP), FERME GERMAIN, CH

CLASS 13 – COWS BORN 1ST JULY – 31ST SEPTEMBER 2015 (14)

Sous Revers O Kaliber Odessa
1st place Class 13
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Favr & Gatwohl

1. SOURS REVERS O KALIVER ODESSA (O KALIBER), FAVRE SEBASTIAN & FLORENCE GRATWOHL, CH
2. GS ALLIANCE DOORMAN DIJURY (DOORMAN), EDWIN STEINER, CH
3. THOSTA ATWOOD SARA (ATWOOD), MARKUS VON KANEL & THOMAS RINDLISBACHER, CH
4. KOLLY-JL CHIP ATHENA (GOLD CHIP), FERME KOLLY-JI, CH
5. SUNIBELLE ATWOOD ESTELLE (ATWOOD), NICOLAS SUDAN, CH
6. GOBELI’S ATWOOD ATRIANA (ATWOOD), GOBELI HOLSTEINS, CH
7. HEINZER GEN GOLDEN DREAM GLYNN (GOLDEN DREAM), PETER HEINZER, CH
8. RUCHTI’S DOORMAN ELSINA (DOORMAN), METIN & MAREE RUCHTI, CH
9. RUCHTI’S DOORMAN ELSINA (DOORMAN), MARTIN & MAREE RUCHTI, CH
10. ILLENS DOORMAN EMMY-LOU (DOORMAN), JACQUES ROUILLER, CH

CLASS 14 – COWS BORN 1ST JANUARY – 30TH JUNE 2015 (13)

Goya
1st place Class 14
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
S Bro & La Waebera

1. GOYA (O KALIBER), S BRO HOLSTEINS & FERME LA WAEBERA, CH
2. C P P OBSERVER SATURNE (OBSERVER), CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION, CH
3. THOSTA ATWOOD SARA (ATWOOD), MARKUS VON KANEL & THOMAS RINDLISBACHER, CH
4. MERRY, DEFAGO-DUBOSSON, CH
5. GS ALLIANCE ATWOOD DARIA (ATWOOD), EDWIN STEINER, CH
6. SIHU O’KALIBER GENESIS (O’KALIBER), HANSUELI SIEGENTTHALER, CH
7. BEL GALACTICO ZUBA (GALACTICO), BELTRAMINO HOLSTEINS & PETER RIDLER, IT/UK
8. P & E LILY (ATWOOD), GAEC LA MEURAZ AND DREAM & COWS, FR
9. ILLENS O KALIBER ELONA (O KALIBER), JACQUES ROUILLER, CH
10. JLD MAMA (MAD MAX), CIMBRIA CLUB & JLD GENETICS, FR

CLASS 15 – COWS BORN 1ST AUGUST – 30TH DECEMBER 2014 (20)

AGH Lila
1st place Class 15
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Beltramino, Bag2, All. Nure, Bach, Sarreri

1. AGH LILA (GOLDWYN), BELTRAMINO, BAG 2, ALL. NURE, BACH & SARRERI, IT
2. PTIT COEUR DORCY SWISSESSE (DORCY), ROGER FROSSARD, CH
3. CHOLLET-STAR GOLD CHIP VERONA (GOLD CHIP), SEBASTIAN FAVRE, FLORENCE GRATWOHL & LORENZ BACH, CH
4. EHA JEVEA (DEMPSEY), GAEC TOULZE, THIERRY GAUTHIER & FAMILLE ANGAU, FR
5. GUILLET AL DUSKA (SHOT AL), ELSA GUILLET, CH
6. C P P AFTERSHOCK RAHELIA (AFTERSHOCK), CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION, CH
7. LONGERAIE LOOKOUT AVENANTE (LOOKOUT), NICOLA TORNARE, CH
8. ILLENS O’GOLD DOLOMITES (O’GOLD), JACQUES ROUILLER, CH
9. C P P DEMPSEY BETTY-BLUE (DEMPSEY), CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION, CH
10. BOURGO ATWOOD BABIOLE (ATWOOD), LAURENT & JEAN-PHILIPPE JAQUET, CH

CLASS 16 – COWS BORN 1ST JANUARY – 31ST JULY 2014 (13)

Sunibelle Dempsey Esprit
1st place Class 16
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Von Kanel, Sudan, Jones, Conroy

1. SUNIBELLE DEMPSEY ESPRIT (DEMPSEY), M & N VON KANEL, GARY JONES & PAT CONROY, CH/IRL/USA
2. DUGROSCHENE SNOWDEN JORALIE 27 (SNOWDEN), MARC & ERHARD JUNKER, CH
3. DU BON VENT JANNA CAMA (AFTERSHOCK), REY HOLSTEINS, FR
4. MORANDALE GILLESPY NIRVANA (GILLESPY),
5. TSCHIRREN’S ARMANI BOLIVIA (ARMANI), THOMAS TSCHIRREN, CH
6. DESGRANGES MCCUTCHEN LAVANDE (MCCUTCHEN), STAUFFRED HOLSTEIN, CH
7. BEL DREAMS VALERIA (GOLDEN DREAMS), FERME GERMAIN, CH
8. DESGRANGES DUDE ARIZONA (DUDE), EARL PRINZ, FR
9. JEGOUZO JACOUSIE (LADD), KURT WILLMANN, WTS-GENETICS, CH
10. MORANDALE ATWOOD NIMESIS (ATWOOD), FRANCOIS MORAND, CH

CLASS 17 – COWS BORN 1ST MAY – 31ST DECEMBER 2013 (13)

Hellender Atwood Genesis
1st place Class 17
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Andreas and Thomas Ender

1. HELLENDER ATWOOD GENESIS (ATWOOD), ANDREAS & THOMAS ENDER, CH
2. DU BON VENT INKAPI (BRAWLER), BELTRAMINO, BAG2, ALL NURE & SARRERI, IT
3. ES CANNES ATWOOD GRACE (ATWOOD), CLAUDE DUMAS, CH
4. IZELLA DU MEZOU (DEMPSEY), ALL NURE, BAG 2, EARL DU MEZOU, Q GUIAVARCH’H & ELEVAGE LBB, IT/FR
5. NOVA IFTY (FEVER), NOVALAIT, DERU, DUFFAU & VIGNES, FR
6. GUEZEL INDIANA (MERIDIAN), MARC & ERHARD JUNKER & AL.BE.RO STAUB, CH
7. HOLST PAPAUX ATWOOD PALMIRA (ATWOOD), CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION, CH
8. PRADERGRENS GILLESPY LANCIA (GILLESPY), CEDRIC & MONIQUE PRADERVAND-REY, CH
9. C P P AFTERSHOCK PANDORA (AFTERSHOCK), CURRAT PAPAUX ASSOCIATION, CH
10. POM IVANESSA (GEDELOIRE), GAEC POM HOLSTEIN, FR

CLASS 18 – COWS BORN 1ST JANUARY 2012 – 31ST MARCH 2013 (10)

BIJOU
1st place Class 18
2019 Swiss Expo Holstein Show
Habegger