Archive for August 2017

Milk Production by The California Numbers – 20% of the nation’s milk supply!

Remember in the 50’s when Paint by Number sets allowed anyone to produce recognizable scenes using oil and brushes?  It smelled like art.  It used artist’s tools.  But, unfortunately, just simply following the numbers did not make the best artists?

In a different way, the dairy industry loves reducing our industry to numbers!  Statistics.  Data.  Every day a new analysis listing percentages and totals flashes across the screens and headlines in front of us. If not, we can seek them out ourselves.  Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that seeing and hearing the numbers … even daily…will turn us into better milk producers any more than painting by numbers will turn us into great artists.

California Top Numbers

For example, recent headlines focused on California milk production reported all those statistical numbers that grab our attention. “59 counties produce 50%” “13 counties account for 25%” and “California continues to produce roughly 20% of the nation’s milk supply.”  The final statement by numbers reported, “USDA’s analysis shows that 826 counties increased milk production in December 2016 compared to the previous December. One thousand thirteen counties decreased production in that same period. Most of the reduced production came in the central and southeast regions of the country.”

This is all well and good.  I like knowing what 25% are doing?  But beyond that, I ask, “Are the other 75% doing something different? Or is 25% a large number in this context?”

Living for almost fifty years with a master of statistics, I am trained to ask the second question,
“What do the numbers mean for what I am doing?  Should I or could I do something different?”

“Dairy Farming is the Leading Cause of Statistics.”

That subhead may seem to emphasize humor. In fact, there are numerous mathematical ways to look at the dairy industry. When you reduce U.S. milk production to numbers, you learn that milk production is highly concentrated. The USDA reports that 50% of California and Federal Milk Marketing Order production is found in just 59 counties. Looking closer at those 59 counties, you learn that they are just 3.6% of the 1,632 counties that produce milk in California and the Federal order system.  Further analysis, reveals that 13 counties account for 25% of that milk production and 7 of them are in California.  Those 7 California dairies account for nearly 18% of milk production.  And one county – Tulare County in California’s Central Valley, accounts for nearly 6% of all milk produced in California and the Federal Order system.

Some Dairy Numbers Cause Excitement. Some Dairy Numbers Cause Exits.

Depending on where you farm, you must determine what it means to the success of your dairy operation.  Should you move?  Is it better to be outside the main concentration area? Should you consider becoming pro-active for increased federal support? At the day-to-day operations level, do the statistics inspire you to seek out suppliers and dairy support teams who can provide input on increased milk production or better profit margins based on your logistics?

Where you fall in the statistical analysis is important but even more important is knowing how to use the statistics to meet your business goals. Does the size of leading national producers affect my operation?  Perhaps the biggest question revolves around the scale of the consumer base that directly affects my dairy operation.

“Are we using statistics as a drunken man uses lamp posts for support rather than illumination.”

If the only use we make of statistical analysis is to prove that what we are currently doing is right, eventually the dairy industry will move on and leave us behind.  Dairy managers must always make pro-active decisions every day.  The hardest of those decisions will involve determining what numbers are most relevant.  It is absolutely vital to know your own numbers and how they compare to your local, state and national peers in the dairy community. Here are six that you can’t afford to overlook.

  1. Weight of milk
  2. Weight of animals
  3. Ration numbers
  4. Comparison by age group
  5. Comparison by period
  6. Geographic impact. What effect does your location have on all the above?

First, you must collect all the data, and then you should be creative in using it to make informed decisions. 

PROFIT BY THE NUMBERS

Sustainable success is measured by numbers up, down and location east versus west

Up:

USDA’s analysis shows that 826 counties increased milk production in December 2016 compared to the previous December.

Down:

One thousand thirteen counties decreased production in that same 2016 period. Most of the reduced production came in the central and southeast regions of the country. During the same time, there has been a drop off in production in California due to the pressures relating to drought and low milk prices. Three California cooperatives have petitioned USDA to join the Federal Order system, with a vote expected later this year.

West is Best:

Twelve of the top 13 counties are in the West. Others on the list include Yakima, Wash., Weld, Colo., Pinal, Ariz., and Chaves, N.M. When all the numbers are totaled, California continues to produce approximately 20% of the United States milk supply. 

East is Least:

Lancaster Pennsylvania is the only county east of the Missouri River to make the top 13 counties list

The Bullvine Bottom Line

What do the CALIFORNIA NUMBERS mean to you? Is it entirely geographical or is there a logistical component? Simply knowing the numbers, will not ensure dairy success. However, we can learn from looking at the big picture they provide. Then we must decide how to turn the numerical science into dairy profitability.  That’s the art of using numbers!

 

 

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THE LIFE, ART and DAIRY LOVE of ARTIST ANDREA JORGENSEN

Some might say that artist Andrea Jorgensen, of Webberville Michigan, is an overnight success.  You might agree, especially after hearing her say, “I didn’t start painting until the fall of 2015.” Since that time her paintings are drawing considerable attention and have given her the opportunity to build a career from commissioned pieces. The Bullvine recently had the privilege of interviewing Andrea and finding out about the evolving story behind her art.

Everyday Objects Are Given New Life

All good success stories must look back to the earliest beginnings. “I have always been artistic starting from a very young age,” says Andrea as she looks back to pastimes where creativity sprang from whatever was close at hand. “I can remember constantly creating random DIY projects with trash around the house, building nonsense wood pieces in my grandpa’s workshop, sewing anything I could think of with my grandma’s scrap fabric, and always drawing.” It is obvious that Andrea’s loving family surroundings impacted her artistic talents.

Studying Art Has Always Been a Happy Choice for Andrea

As a child growing up in Williamston Michigan, Andrea was drawn to the creative subjects at each different level of the school curriculum.” I took almost every art class possible all the way through high school. That was my time to really be myself and to create and to learn art with different mediums.” From the beginning, Andrea knew she had found something she enjoyed and excelled at. She recalls, “I mainly leaned towards drawing with a pencil because it came easiest for me. Even through college, I took art classes because it was fun and exciting.”

Through the Eyes of an Artist

Andrea Jorgensen now living and loving life on Ri-Val-Re Farm in Webberville, Michigan unexpectedly declares that her journey to becoming a bovine artist wasn’t the usual one of lifelong familiarity with cows. “I wasn’t raised on a farm, so the whole dairy industry has really opened my eyes.”   Andrea’s eye-opening experience has art also opened the eyes of dairy art lovers. Those familiar with her art, admire her eye for dairy anatomy and the way her paintings capture the nuances of the different personalities or her subjects.  From a single painting or a hanging of several pieces, it is easy to see what set’s Andrea’s work apart. Her unique, ultra-colorful paintings, are comprised of layers of bright acrylics that enhance and expand our usual perception of the black, white and brown dairy cows that dairy folk love to admire. (Read more: BREEDING RI-VAL-RE: Where Looking Good in the Stall Is Just As Important As Looking Good On Paper)

 

 

Andrea Began by Using Her Gift as A Gift

So, let’s return to consideration of the relatively short amount of time that Andrea has been painting. “I didn’t start painting until fall of 2015.” says Andrea giving the time and then goes on to explain the reason, “My husband, Jerry, had gone on a hunting trip and I had an urge to surprise him with a painting of one of his donor heifers, Hope. Plus, we had moved into our farm house earlier that Spring and I wanted a cow portrait in our living room. Next thing I knew I was painting a 4 x 6 ft. portrait of my husband’s beloved cow, Redwing.” She might just as well say the rest was history, because she explains, “After that Jerry really encouraged me to continue painting cows and that’s when I created Artwork by APJ.”

From One Love-Inspired Gift to Creator of Many Gifted Paintings

You might say that Andrea was inspired by a favorite from her husband Jerry’s stable and, as a result, Andrea has created a stable of painted favorites to send out into the world. Much of Andrea’s painting has been done on commission and frequently the products of her talent, like the gift she painted for her husband, become gifts given and shared between other dairy admirers.

“The World is My Inspiration!”

When asked who has been the biggest influence on Andrea, her answer is as unique as the pieces that she produces. “Art wise, I can’t really think of anything or anyone particular that has had a significant influence on me,” she says and then expands dramatically. “The world, in general, is my inspiration and influencer.” She shows her artistic awareness when she analyzes how that inspiration affects her work. “I can look at a bowl of strawberries and automatically get inspired to do a red scheme background.” I think having that perspective has really helped me find my known style.”

Andrea Paints Bold, Colorful Bovines

Andrea’s artwork is a bright representation of her subjects, and she doesn’t aim to be low key.  “Bold and colorful! The more colors, the better. My style also involves visible brush strokes with every layer I paint.” It is unique and immediately evokes a response.  For more of her work visit her website. Scrolling through Andrea’s canvases, photographs and projects will quickly highlight and showcases her love of animals, nature, family, home, and farming.

Love Inspires the Artist’s Journey

As we get to meet this artist, we are in the fortunate position of being able to use hindsight to discern what events were responsible for getting Andrea’s artistic career started.  Andrea gives credit for her introduction to dairy to one her husband Jerry Jorgensen, known to many as a successful dairy breeder and recognized dairy judge. “I probably wouldn’t be painting at all if it wasn’t for him. Not just because of the support and encouragement but because of the family dairy farm. I wasn’t raised on a farm, so the whole dairy industry has really opened my eyes. I always thought cows were dumb, stinky creatures before I met Jerry.” It is an understatement to say that he changed her initial perceptions of cattle, “Yes, they can still come off (as smelly) but I have a different respect for their beauty now.” 

 

 

 

Andrea Reveals Love That Goes Beyond Cows

At this point, I must make sure that my reporting does not limit Andrea’s artistic talent to cow portraits only.  As much as this is what drives The Bullvine, it isn’t fair to this gifted artist to limit the reporting of her talents to dairy only. Indeed, when asked to list her favorite works to date, Andrea responds the same way that dairy breeders, cattle judges and show string historians do, by first proclaiming what a difficult question that is. “It’s so hard to choose one! I have an attachment with all my paintings! There’s a top 5 favorites list which is constantly changing as I do more paintings.” Her diversity shows in the list she provided us with, which included what is hanging in her own home.” Right now, I would say my top 5 favorites are (in no particular order): Burt & Ernie (a painting of 2 pigs that is hanging in our living room), Antoine (a ram), Gizzard (a longhorn), Alfred (a rooster that is hanging in our kitchen), & Gatsby (a custom Jersey).

Andreas Goes Beyond an Exact Likeness to Painted Poetry

If, until now, you’ve never seen Andrea Jorgensen’s work, you are in for a treat. In a world of photographic realism and real-time animal videos, it is especially refreshing to find a talented artist who uses deft strokes to create unique portraiture.  She doesn’t target a perfect likeness. Her clients already know what the subject looks like.  What makes Andrea’s work unique is that it goes beyond the restrictions of a portrait or video frame to a composition that skillfully reveals a deeper understanding of her subjects. Which inspires the question, “How do you decide what to paint?” Andrea gives us a look behind the scene with her answer. “Ninety-five percent of my paintings are commissioned, so I work with the customer to get a good reference photo before I start painting. Otherwise, I will randomly find a picture on Facebook or Instagram that really catches my eye.” Andrea’s business portfolio “Artwork by APJ” continues to grow at the pace of her enthusiasm and growing recognition.

Andrea’s Advice

Whenever you see someone doing a successful job of using their talents to build a career, it is human nature to want to understand how they have managed to do it. As a successfully productive artist, Andrea is in the position of not only growing from her own life choices but also being able to help others who wish to start their artistic journey.  Her suggestions, like her art, are bold, forthright and forward looking. Here are the three that she urges others to use.

  1. DO NOT compare your work to other artists.
  2. Find your style
  3. Don’t be afraid to push your comfort zone

It seems obvious that artist Andrea also has talents to share as a mentor.

The Artist.  The Mother.

Now that we have glimpsed what goes on in Andrea’s studio, our natural curiosity leads us to find out more about Andrea herself.  Readers of The Bullvine can all relate to the fact that there are times in life when our passion for our work inspires our daily lives and prepares us for new pathways. This is true for the Jorgensen’s too as we learn from Andrea’s update. “By the time you read this, I’ll be working on something different. I have a few custom pieces I’m finishing before I have to take a pause, we are expecting, a little girl the first part of August. I’m also getting things organized for my dream-come-true-booth at World Dairy Expo.” We all look forward to seeing her at Dairy Expo, but her other life benchmark also has us applauding.

Congratulations to the Jorgensen Family

We are thrilled to join with friends, family and Bullvine readers in congratulating Andrea and Jerry on the arrival of their baby girl. Izadore Irvette Jorgensen was born on August 1st.  We wish you all the best as you hold this work of art in your arms and create a beautiful family together.  

Hand in Hand.  Romance.  Cows and Art.

Andrea concludes our interview with a special thank you for those who have helped her get this far in her career. “I wouldn’t be where I’m at today if it wasn’t for my husband. He has encouraged me from day one.” It takes special support to pursue art the way Andrea has, and she is grateful. “A huge thanks to everyone that follows me on social media and those who have commissioned or bought a painting. Their support keeps me motivated to continue creating new pieces of art. It means more than they will ever know!” As a result, Andrea has built on this exceptional support, to grow an impressive following in just two years. She is justifiably enthusiastic about the future. ‘My goal is to keep creating colorful pieces of art for other people to enjoy. I hope to keep growing and evolving with all of life’s changes being thrown at me. I could not be more excited.”

The Bullvine Bottom Line

The Bullvine wishes Andrea Jorgensen all the best with her growing business and growing family.  We enthusiastically hope that she will continue to open her gallery doors and continue painting until the cows come home.

 

 

 

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Is Milk’s Healthy Halo Trendy or Tarnished?

Canadians have long looked with jealousy, envy and/or admiration at the school milk program in the USA.  We think what a huge difference that could make to national production requirements.

In the US that is 50 million milk drinkers. It often appears to us that this is a subsidy that isn’t acknowledged front and center like the backlash we get for having a quota system.  Having said that, it is a long-term marketing plan that could keep the dairy market growing.

“A positive experience with school milk can build lifelong consumers.”
Tom Gallagher is Chief Executive Officer of Dairy Management Inc.™, 

It is logical for the dairy industry to consider positive ways to keep milk consumption rising and discovering new ways to attract new consumers.  That’s the only way to sustain the dairy industry. Regardless of what support the industry receives, long term industry success will depend on the consumers’ opinion of milk as their choice of beverage.

This has had me tuning in more carefully to the way we make our beverage choices.  I haven’t yet heard myself, or any other social hosts, restaurants or meeting organizers say, “What would you like to drink? I have soda, beer, wine and ice cold, delicious whole milk!”

If we are looking for the long term survival of the dairy industry, we must consider the future consumer and how they will make their choices. I did a super mini survey among my eight grandchildren – five of whom have free milk at school.  We are fortunate that none of them are lactose intolerant, but it is interesting to note that it isn’t whether it’s free or good for you that is driving their selection processes.

Kids Interest in Beverages is Learned from What They See!

I sometimes ask myself if milk should be restricted to certain age groups.  Can you imagine a child reaching the age of consent and looking with delight to having their first glass of milk?  Would milk bashes become the new drive-your-parents’-crazy party gathering? Of course, I’ve wandered far from the (beaten) path. My point, such as it is, is that we don’t do enough to promote the product (from which we earn our living).

Probably I spend too much time at the refrigerator door, replenishing my glass of milk.  Having said that, I am delighted to see the modern trend toward smoothies.  Here is a yummy place for milk, cream, yogurt, and cheese to add new dairy product consumers.  Granted there are non-milk milks that are used here such as soy and almond milks but, in general, this is a growing potential market. Even the beverage leading coffee chains are expanding their brands with new lattes and cream flavors.

Learn from Other Beverage Industries

More attention is being placed on the benefits of healthy eating.  Whole industries from bottled water to micro-brewers to winemakers and specialty coffee shops are cashing in on the healthy and tasty ways their beverages provide what the consumer is looking for.

Beverage Industry Trends

That isn’t to say that there aren’t trends that are changing the beverage industry.  In January of last year, the Business Insider reported, “The beverage industry is experiencing some major changes heading into the new year. ” The article went on to point out health and wellness trends such as “all-natural, energy-boosting, relaxation and fortification.” Concerns are rising in the beverage industry. “As the demonization of sugar increasingly paints big beverage companies as the enemy, the industry is eager to humanize itself.”

Does Providing Good Food Translate into Doing Good Business?

Are we teaching kids to drink milk? Schools represent more than 50 million current and future consumers who have the option to consume milk and other dairy foods at least 180 days a year. Tom Gallagher, Chief Executive Officer, Dairy Management Inc. sees this as an opportunity to affect the health of young consumers. “Youth wellness is a longstanding priority for dairy farm families. In the USA the dairy checkoff is seen as a way carrying out this commitment as part of its daily mission.”

In Canada, there is no government involvement, but John Leveris, Dairy Farmers’ of Canada assistant director for market development, speaking for the not-for-profit initiative ESMP (Elementary School Milk Program) says

Typically the milk is sold to the schools at prevailing market prices. Schools then determine a ‘fundraising’ profit (generally $0.05 to $0.10), after which families pay approximately $0.65 per carton.”

It’s a significant discount from what one would pay for a 250mL carton of milk at a restaurant or convenience store,” he adds.

Is Milk’s better-for-you health halo Trendy? Tired? Or Tarnished?

As an industry, we must not just maintain but grow consumer support.  Our future depends on it.  Is our long-held image of milk and milk products a product of seeing our industry through rose colored glasses?  As long as we receive our producer’s checks, do we need to worry about what beverages are the most popular?  Maybe milk isn’t even in the top 10.  What is the beverage consumers are sipping?  Is the dairy industry slipping?

Does the next Generation of consumers care about what is “Good for you?”

A little carton of milk may seem like a minor thing, but it can have far reaching benefits for both the producing and consuming sides of the dairy industry. Statistical analysis has important considerations. “There are approximately 200 days in the school year which means there are 200 lunches, or in other words, 200 opportunities for children to make healthy food choices.” Although the intentions are good, it may be a bit presumptuous to assume that merely being presented with a nutritious beverage will tip students choices toward milk now or in the future.

As Food Producers Are We Required to Set an Example by Consuming Our Product?

If you work for a car company, you drive the company car.  If you produce computers, you use the company brand.  Many companies require that employees wear company uniforms, colors or logo.  It’s considered part of the job to promote and support the product produced. Is there a similar requirement for milk producers? Is there a line in the sand between producing milk and drinking it and serving milk products?

The Bullvine Bottom Line

The dairy industry is at a turning point as it responds to the continuous changes that keep the beverage industry evolving.  There is much to learn, and it’s no time to distance ourselves with the excuse that passion for our industry is the only branding producers need to be involved in. There is a need for all milk stakeholders to be much more aware of the many forces that impact the milk consumer.

 

 

 

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One on One With Sexing Technologies – Video Interview

Sexing Technologies is the fastest growing company in the dairy genetics industry.  Through the acquisition of semen sexing patents as well as their own research, Sexing Technologies has become the major player in the marketplace.  Now Sexing Technologies has it sights on becoming a significant player in the artificial insemination industry.  Through the purchase of companies like TAG and Taurus and investments in AI companies in Europe, Sexing Technologies has been making waves in the dairy industry, with the potential for more to come.  Recently they have had the #1 proven TPI sire in the world and have been very aggressive in acquiring top genomic males and females around the world. To learn more about this aggressive company, The Bullvine sat down with Sexing Technologies CEO Juan Moreno and the head of dairy programs Dan Carroll to find out the secret to their success and what the future holds.

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AGROLEITE 2017 – Holstein Show

Grand Champion

BORG LUTSKE COUSTEAU ATWOOD 150 FIV
Grand Champion
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
CARLOS JACOB WALLAUER

Grand Champion: BORG LUTSKE COUSTEAU ATWOOD 150 FIV, CARLOS JACOB WALLAUER
Reserve Grand Champion: RCH JOYA 972 DURHAM LIGHTNING TE, REGINE HANA NOORDEGRAAF
HM Grand Champion: HALLEY VERDADE WINDBROOK 274 TE, PEDRO ELGERSMA

Intermediate Champion

ARM SONIE BOULDER 311 MB – 85 Intermediate Champion Agroleite Holstein Show 2017 ARMANDO RABBERS

Intermediate Champion: ARM SONIE BOULDER 311, ARMANDO RABBERS
Reserve Intermediate Champion: HALLEY RUIVINHA DOORMAN 538 TE, PEDRO ELGERSMA
HM Intermediate Champion: FINI DOORMAN MAAIKE 5768 TE, HANS JAN GROENWOLD

Junior Champion

CRA HIGH OCTAIN NELY 107
Junior Champion
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
Robert Solomons

Junior Champion: C.R.A. HIGH OCTANE NELY 1071, ROBERT SALOMONS
Reserve Junior Champion: KLAAS REINO 1729, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME
HM Junior Champion: BUR JR. GINA 3118, HENDRIK DE BOER E/OU REINALDO DE B

Judges Interview

Junior Calf

BUR JR DEALMAKER GINA 3247
1st place Junior Calf
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
Henrick De Boer

  1. BUR JR. DEALMAKER GINA 3247, HENDRIK DE BOER E/OU REINALDO DE B
  2. FINI DOORMAN MARTHA 7064, HANS JAN GROENWOLD
  3. C.R.A. ENDURE MINA 1160, ROBERT SALOMONS
  4. RECANTO ALEGRE BYWAY COLORADA 11, ROBERT SALOMONS
  5. PUC PR MARAISA MONTEREY 617, APC FAZENDA EXPERIMENTAL GRALHA

Intermediate Calf

BUR JR ANDREA 3216 TE
1st place Class 4 (01/12/2016 to 28/02/2017)
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
Henrick De Boer

  1. BUR JR. ANDREA 3216 TE, HENDRIK DE BOER E/OU REINALDO DE B
  2. ARM BECK MASCALESE 541, ARMANDO RABBERS
  3. C.R.A. DAMION FADA 1136 TE, ROBERT SALOMONS
  4. C.R.A. BYWAY MAAIKE 1141 TE, ROBERT SALOMONS
  5. C.H.SALOMONS JANIE 1811, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME

Senior Calf

BUR JR ANGELICA 3133 TE
1st place Fall Calf
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
Henrick De Boer

  1. BUR JR. ANGELICA 3133 TE, HENDRIK DE BOER E/OU REINALDO DE B
  2. BORG TULIPA YORICK MONTEREY 1963, UBEL BORG E/OU ROGERIO EGBERT BOR
  3. FINI DOORMAN HERINGA 6396, HANS JAN GROENWOLD
  4. C.R.A. MERIDIAN JOYA 1132, ROBERT SALOMONS
  5. BUR JR. ELEGANCE 3136 TE, HENDRIK DE BOER E/OU REINALDO DE B

Summer Yearling

BUR JR GINA 3118
1st place Summer Yearling
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
Henrick De Boer

  1. BUR JR. GINA 3118, HENDRIK DE BOER E/OU REINALDO DE B
  2. C.R.A. ATWOOD FINA 1099 TE, ROBERT SALOMONS
  3. FINI OCTANE MAAIKE 6293 TE, HANS JAN GROENWOLD
  4. C.H.SALOMONS AALTJE 1781, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME
  5. FINI DOORMAN MAAIKE 6363 TE, HANS JAN GROENWOLD

Junior Yearling

CRA HIGH OCTAIN NELY 107
1st place Junior Yearling
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
Robert Solomons

  1. C.R.A. HIGH OCTANE NELY 1071, ROBERT SALOMONS
  2. KLAAS REINO 1729, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME
  3. MENGE BYWAY E2845, CARLOS JACOB WALLAUER
  4. KLAAS AALTJE 1763, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME
  5. FINI OCTANE MAAIKE 6157 TE, HANS JAN GROENWOLD

Winter Yearling

GRANJA CAVALLI LEONORA SID 601 FV
1st place Winter Yearling
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
Granja Cavalli

  1. GRANJA 1 CAVALLI LEONORA SID 601 FIV, GRANJA CAVALLI
  2. GRANJA CAVALLI BARBARA GOLDDUSTE, GRANJA CAVALLI
  3. RCH JOYA 616 REGINALD, RAPHAEL CORNELIS HOOGERHEIDE
  4. FINI DOORMAN HERINGA 6027 TE, HANS JAN GROENWOLD
  5. KIVI BRAXTON LAURA 1444, JEAN LEANDRO KIERS

Senior Yearling

FINI DOORMAN MAAIKE 5759 TE
1st place Senior Yearling
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
Hans Jan Groenwold

  1. FINI DOORMAN MAAIKE 5759 TE, HANS JAN GROENWOLD
  2. KLAAS AALTJE 1699, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME
  3. KLAAS AALTJE 1693, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME
  4. WILPE MCCUTCHEN FILA 320 FIV, LEONEL ARLINDO DALFOVO

Unfresh 2 Year Old

FORT CILENE FOORMAN SOL 52 FIV
1st place Unfresh 2 Year Old
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
CARLOS JACOB WALLAUER

  1. FORT CILENE DOORMAN SOL 52 F.I.V, CARLOS JACOB WALLAUER
  2. KLAAS REINO 1675, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME
  3. WILPE BYWAY LAMARQUE 311, LEONEL ARLINDO DALFOVO
  4. WILPE SID CHANCA 295 FIV, LEONEL ARLINDO DALFOVO

Junior Herd

  1. HENDRIK DE BOER E/OU REINALDO DE B
  2. ROBERT SALOMONS
  3. HANS JAN GROENWOLD

Junior Exhibitor

  1. AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME 1972
  2. HANS JAN GROENWOLD 1910
  3. ROBERT SALOMONS 1808

Milking Yearling

FINI DOORMAN MAAIKE 5768 TE
Milking Yearling
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
HANS JAN GROENWOLD

  1. FINI DOORMAN MAAIKE 5768 TE, HANS JAN GROENWOLD
  2. FINI DOORMAN MAAIKE 5753 TE, HANS JAN GROENWOLD
  3. HALLEY REBITE G W ATWOOD 610 TE, PEDRO ELGERSMA
  4. HALLEY REBITE DOORMAN 607 TE, PEDRO ELGERSMA
  5. HALLEY REBITE G W ATWOOD 603 TE, PEDRO ELGERSMA

Junior Two Year Old

HALLEY REBITE DOORMAN 580 TE
Junior Two Year Old
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
PEDRO ELGERSMA

  1. HALLEY REBITE DOORMAN 580 TE, PEDRO ELGERSMA
  2. FINI ROBLE JITSKE 5682, HANS JAN GROENWOLD
  3. NOBREZA DOORMAN BAXTER 968, REGINE HANA NOORDEGRAAF
  4. C.R.A. JORDAN BRITANIA 945, ROBERT SALOMONS
  5. CONSTENTATION ELISA UNIX, ALESSANDRO H.DEKKERS E/OU MARISA

Senior Two Year Old

HALLEY RUIVINHA DOORMAN 538 TE
1st Place Senior Two Year Old
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
PEDRO ELGERSMA

  1. HALLEY RUIVINHA DOORMAN 538 TE, PEDRO ELGERSMA
  2. CONSTENTATION DARAH DOORMAN. CARLOS JACOB WALLAUER
  3. BUR JR. ELEGANCE 2743, HENDRIK DE BOER E/OU REINALDO DE B
  4. BORG LETICIA DRAKE YORICK 1782. UBEL BORG E/OU ROGERIO EGBERT BOR
  5. WILPE DOORMAN REBECA 218, LEONEL ARLINDO DALFOVO

Junior Three Year Old

ARM SONIE BOULDER 311 MB – 85
1st Place Junior Three Year Old
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
ARMANDO RABBERS

  1. ARM SONIE BOULDER 311, ARMANDO RABBERS
  2. C.J.C. TERTULIANA ALEXANDER 729, CARLOS JACOB WALLAUER
  3. WILPE DUDE CHANCA 180, LEONEL ARLINDO DALFOVO
  4. BUR JR. SONIA 2618, HENDRIK DE BOER E/OU REINALDO DE B
  5. C.H.SALOMONS VITORIA 1549 FIV, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME

Senior-Three-Year-Olds

KLAAS AALTJE 1492 TE (Atwood)
1st Place Senior Three Year Old
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS

  1. KLAAS AALTJE 1492 TE, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME
  2. HALLEY SOBRIA DETROIT 411, PEDRO ELGERSMA
  3. BUR JR. SONIA 2579, HENDRIK DE BOER E/OU REINALDO DE B
  4. FINI CEO HERINGA 3006, ROBERT SALOMONS
  5. WILPE ATWOOD NUBIA 127, LEONEL ARLINDO DALFOVO

Four-Year-Olds

TANG MELINHA ALEXANDER 8136
1st Place Four Year Old
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
JAN JOHANNES DE BOUR & FERNANDO R DE BOUR

  1. TANG MELINHA ALEXANDER 8136, JAN JOHANNES DE BOER E/OU FERNANDO
  2. FINI GOLD CHIP HERINGA 3847 FIV, HANS JAN GROENWOLD
  3. LOSPETTER MONIKE ATWOOD 1149 TE, JOAO CORNELIO LOS
  4. KLAAS AALTJE 1413 TE, AGROPECUARIA SALOMONS LTDA – ME
  5. KIVI GOLDWYN CHRISTINE 1071 TE, JEAN LEANDRO KIERS

Five-Year-Olds

BORG LUTSKE COUSTEAU ATWOOD 150 FIV
1st Place Five Year Old
Agroleite Holstein Show 2017
CARLOS JACOB WALLAUER