Archive for July 2012

Having a successful dairy farm enterprise can be achieved in a multitude of ways.  Even though no two farms are exactly alike, where there is success there is a business person with dreams, goals and plans that get put into action.  Invariably there are five key factors that the business manager monitors closely on a continual basis.  These factors are often referred to as Key Performance Indicators.

Choose YOUR Key Indicators

Each farm and farm manager has individual needs and factors that need attention at any given time.  One way to get started on knowing your KPIs is to consider six main areas.

  1. Daily output
  2. Nutrition program
  3. Animal reproduction
  4. Heifer rearing
  5. Animal health and disease
  6. Genetics and Marketing

A good recommendation is to focus on one performance indicator from each of the six areas:

Daily Output

  • Milk yield per cow per dairy
  • Fat plus Protein yield per cow per day
  • Milk revenue per cow per day
  • Daily revenue less feed cost per cow per day
  • Milk sold per worker per year

Nutrition

  • Dry matter intake per cow per day
  • Feed cost per cow per day
  • Cost per ton for feed consumed by the milking herd

Reproduction  

  • AI services per conception
  • Percent of cows detected in heat by 90 days in milk
  • Pregnancy rate
  • Days Open
  • Calving Interval

Heifer Rearing

  • Live heifer calves per hundred milking cows per year
  • Percent of heifer calves ,born live, that enter the milking herd
  • Rearing cost per heifer
  • Age at first calving

Animal Health and Disease

  • Cull rate from the milking herd
  • Average weighted SCC per cow
  • Days between mastitis onsets
  • Vet and medicine costs per cow per year
  • Number of lame cow incidents per 100 cows per year

Genetics, Sales and Marketing

  • Breeding stock revenue per cow per year
  • Average TPI or LPI or Net Merit per pregnancy
  • Average classification score for first calvers
  • Number of farm website hits per month
  • Total annual revenue per worker per year

How To Get Started:

The task of developing a KPI program for a herd can be daunting. Suggestions on getting started include:

  • While relaxing in the evening for a week jot down some areas you feel could be improved on your farm
  • Give your list to your vet, your accountant and your feed advisor and ask them to comment
  • Narrowing the list down to five making sure they are numbers easily obtained from your DHI records, your herd management software or your farm financial software.
  • Start by getting the historical numbers for the past year
  • Set goals you wish to achieve in one year`s time
  • Keep the process dynamic including changing the list annually, if necessary
  • Do not make the list too long.  Five is a good number.

PROFIT is a GOOD WORD:

Dairy cattle breeders tend not to speak in terms of profit per cow per year.  More often their bragging points are in terms of animal records or enterprise performance.  Yet it is profit per cow that covers living costs, provides return on investment, pays for kids’ college educations and keeps the banker happy.  It is strongly recommended that at least one of the five KPIs should be a measure of dollar revenue, feed costs or net returns.

BULLVINE BOTTOM LINE:

Relating genetics to farm management and farm profit is not always an easy twosome to bring together.  However, for success there must be measures that can be continually monitored so that farm managers can make informed decisions or take corrective actions.  Find your key performance indicators and grow your profits.

Dairy Show Judging – It Takes Courage

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Sr. 3 yr old Reasons Ontario Spring Show 2012I had the opportunity to attend Ontario Summer Show last week and saw something that really got me thinking.  During the Senior 3 year old class, Judge David Crack Jr showed the courage of his convictions by choosing to win with Earlen Goldwyn Secret over the highly touted Craigcrest Rubies Gold Rejoice.

Setting the Stage

By now everyone has heard of Craigcrest Rubies Gold Rejoice.  She is the 3 time All-Canadian, 3 time All-American, Res. Int. Champion from Madison last year.  But who has heard of Earlen Goldwyn Secret?  Her only show winnings of record are 2nd Sr. 2yr at a county show last year.  Their records could not be more different.  Rejoice has people drooling in the barns over her massive size and her amazing frame.  Did this nobody deserve to beat her?

Setting the Precedent

Throughout the day, Judge Crack had always gone with the most correct, most dairy heifers and 2yr olds.  Therefore, when it came time for the Sr. 3yr old class.  To some it may have seemed that he had worked himself into a corner.  He could stick with what he had gone with all day and win with Secret or give in to popular pressure and win with Rejoice.

As Judge Crack switched the two from his initial pull to then place Secret on top, in discussion with the ringside judges it was noted that making that move  would “take a set of balls”.  Big ones! Judge Crack either had to win with Secret or he had to put her into third, as the 2nd and 3rd place cows very much typed in together.

I have always found this to be a very complex and interesting problem.  The Dairy Cow Scorecard is clear on the weightings and you are taught that every animal is to be judged individually.  So then why does a judge have to put cattle in groups?  The best way I can describe it, is to remember what Murray Reisner and Lowell Lindsay once said to me.  “While the judging scorecard is very clear every judge has their preferences, and if you are going to stray from the scorecard in your preferences, you need to be consistent.  So if there is a particular type of cow you like, be consistent.”

Consistency is actually a huge part of earning credibility as a judge.  While everyone may not always agree with your placings, if they can follow them, and see that you are consistent, they may not agree but they will respect your decision.  As a spectator and an avid show advocate this is my biggest beef with some judges.  I would like to tell them, “I don’t need to agree with you, but make sure I can follow your placings.  Follow a consistent pattern, and you will earn my respect.

Favoritism?

A question was raised on Friday that I want to address before it goes too far.  “Is Judge Crack favoring his fellow Quebecers?”  Judge Crack’s  pattern was definitely there with  the winning Senior 2 yr Old, Junior 3 year old, Senior 3 year old and 4 year old who would eventually be pulled to the centre of the ring for the final selection of Champions.  Indeed, a heck of a day for Ferme Yvon Sicard, Ferme Blondin and Ghyslain Demers.  However, having watched the classes first hand and knowing Judge Crack as I do, I would say it was more that the exhibitors knew exactly the type of cow Judge Crack likes and knew that it would be worth their while to make the long trip to The Ontario Summer Show.

If you look at the winner of every cow class, they all type in together extremely well.  You had to have a great udder, dairyness throughout and you had better have an animal with great mobility.  That was supported  by an exhibitor of a 2nd place animal who reported that as soon as his cow stuttered (blamed on a rock in the ring) he knew that he would not be winning that class.

Lily vs. Beauty

Watching the Sr 3 Yr Old  class unfold reminded me of 1999 when I had the chance to work with the western Canadian string when  ACME STAR LILY was going head to head with RAINYRIDGE TONY BEAUTY.  With both cows being from the same show string tension and speculation was high to see how Judge Comtois would place these two cows.  Compared to Rejoice and Secret their difference in backgrounds was not as great.  At that point Lily was the two time reigning Royal Grand Champion and Beauty was six years off her Royal win and had won Madison that year.  However, in a similar way to Judge Crack’s handling at The Ontario Summer Show, Judge Comtois stayed true to the same style he had selected all day and went with Lily.  Of course, there was a wide-ranging response from the ringside.

Bottom Line

The biggest thing I love about these cases is that both Judge Crack and Judge Comtois stayed true to what they liked and did not give in to the ringside pressure.  While everyone is entitled to their opinion, the opinion that matters most is that of the judge.  For all those who would have placed them differently, “Fantastic!”  I am sure you could have given a great   set of reasons too. The thing you need to remember about judging is to stay true to what you like. The judge’s job is to set a pattern for the breed. Do that and you will earn the respect of everyone that matters!  It takes guts to pick the glory!

 

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Categories : Show Reports

Weekly Show and Sale Recap– 7/28/2012

Saturday, July 28th, 2012

Ontario Summer Show - Grand Champion - Earlen Goldwyn SecretShows

  • Ontario Summer Show
    Lindsay Ontario
    July 27th

    • Junior Calf (16)
      • (BO) Hanalee G Busty Babe (Glacier), Hank & Nancy, Lee & Martin Hazelegeer, ON
      • Crovalley Fever Accent (Fever), Crovalley Holsteins, ON
      • Phoenixholm Dazzler Allison (Dazzler), John Buckley & Robert Crowe, ON
    • Intermediate Calf (25)
      • Sunspark Windbrook Extra (Windbrook), Gracehaven Holsteins (1st 4-H Natasha Tripp), ON
      •  Browlands Fever Larissa (Fever), Brownlands Farm (2nd 4-H Jill Brown), ON
      • Kingsway Lauthority All In (Lauthority), Kingsway farms, Jason David Mell, ON & WI (Matthew Forrestell)
    • Senior Calf (32)
      • Grillsdale Teanscious Rascal (tenacious), John Buckley, ON
      • Lorneva Braxton Dolly (Braxton), Werry Bros & Almet Farms (1st 4-H Dan Werry), ON
      • Crovalley Lauthority Androra (Lauthority), Penny Lane Holsteins (Colleeen Halpenny), ON
    • Summer Yearling (25)
      • Bosdale Fever Laura (Fever), Bosdale Farms Inc, ON
      • Springbend Kalee Atwood (Atwood), Cormdale Genetics INc., ON
      • Kingsway Fever Cowbell (Fever), Kingsway farms, ON
    • Junior Yearling (11)
      • Sharpacres ST Jessy (Showtime), clarkvalley Holsteins, Cassandra & Ronald Werry, ON
      • Benrise Spirte Diamond (Spirte), Benshop Farms, ON
      • Morsan Atwood burka (Atwood), Jamie Farrell, Mosnang Holsteins , Daniel Martin & Marbrae Holsteins, ON & AB
    • Junior Champion of 4-H Show – Lorneva Braxton Dolly (Braxton), Senior calf, Dan Weery, ON
    • Reserve Junior Champion of 4-H Show – Bosdale Fever Laura (Fever), Summer Yearling, JOsh Bosh, ON
    • HM Junior Champion of 4-H Show – Crovalley Lauthority Andorra (Lauthority), 2nd Senior Calf, Colleen Hallpenny, ON
    • Intermediate Yearling (8)
      •  Kingsway Sanchez Armadillo (Sanches), Kingswy Farms & Jason David Mell, ON & WI
      • Winright Jasper Baby Doll (Jasper), Brian Joseph Enright, ON
      • Blondin Destry Sally (Destry), Cormdale Genetics IN., Todd Whittier, Oscar Dupasuier & Al Be Ro Land & Cattle, ON, MA & Italy
    • Senior Yearling (11)
      • Kingsway Goldwyn Artichoke (Goldwyn), Kingsway farms & Jason David Mell, ON & WI
      • Clarkview Picolo Pam (Picolo), Clarkview & Clarkridge Holsteins, ON
      • Brackley Farm Chelios Cheerio (chelios), Vale O Skene Holsteins, Robrook Farms & Bill Metcalf, ON
    • Junior Champion of the Open Show – Kingsway Goldwyn Artichoke (Goldwyn), Kingsway farms & Jason David Mell, ON & WI
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Open Show – Sharpacres ST Jessy (Showtime), clarkvalley Holsteins, Cassandra & Ronald Werry, ON
    • HM Junior Champion – Grillsdale Teanscious Rascal (tenacious), John Buckley, ON
    • Junior 2 Year Old (11)
      • Mapel Wood Atwood Barbara (Atwood), Mapel Wood Farms, ON
      • Benrise Goldwyn Barbie (Goldwyn), Vale O Skene Holsteins & Gary Troup, ON
      • Kingsway Sanchez Arangatang (Sanchez), Kingsway Farms & Jason David Mell, ON
    • Senior 2 Year Old (11)
      • Blondin Alexander Armana (Alexander), Ferme Yvon Sicard & Ferme Blondin, ON
      • Torpedo Damion Susan (Damion), Hodglynn Holsteins & Dennis E Martin, ON
      • Pencroft Jasper Nisha (Jasper), Hodglynn Holsteins, Ferme Blondin, Barclay Phoenix & Gary Jones, ON, QC & Ireland
    • Junior 3 Year Old (7)
      • Cobequid Goldwyn Leno (Goldwyn), Ferme Yvon Sicard & Ghyslain Demers, QC
      • Eastside Gold Offering (Goldwyn), Maplekeys Holsteins, ON
      • Vale o Skene Zircon Kiki (Zircon), Vale O Skene HOlsteins, ON
    • Senior 3 Year Old (8)
      • Earlen Goldwyn Secret (Goldwyn), Ferme Yvon Sicard, Ferme Blondin & Ghyslain Demers, QC
      • Craigcrest Rubies Gold Rejoice (Goldwyn), Craigcrest Holsteins, ON
      • Quality Gold Danzi (Goldwyn), Quality Holsteins, ON
    • Intermediate Champion – Earlen Goldwyn Secret (Goldwyn), Ferme Yvon Sicard, Ferme Blondin & Ghyslain Demers, QC
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion – Cobequid Goldwyn Leno (Goldwyn), Ferme Yvon Sicard & Ghyslain Demers, QC
    • HM Intermediate Champion – Blondin Alexander Armana (Alexander), Ferme Yvon Sicard & Ferme Blondin, ON
    • 4 Year old (11)
      • Roggua Dundee Evelyne (Dundee), Ferme Yvon Sicard & Ghyslain Demers, QC
      • Nipponia RD Lizabeth (Dundee), Kingsway Farms, ON
      • Lincrest Final Cut Freida (Final Cut), Hodglynn Holsteins, B
    • 5 Year Old (4)
      • Kingsway Dundee Drumstick (Dundee), Kingsway Farm & Trentward Farms, ON
      • Crovalley Bltiz Amelia (Blitz), Crovalley Holsteins, ON
      • Tolamika Dundee Allison (Dundee), Crovalley Holsteins, ON
    • Mature Cow (6)
      • Starbrite Lyster Lindsey (Lyster), Hodglynn Holsteins & Starbrite Holsteins, ON
      • Lorshire Talent David (Talent), Mapel Wood Holsteins, ON
      • Pascobac Goldwyn Astra (Goldwyn), Emilane Holsteins, ON
    • Breeders Herd (3)
      • Kingsway Farm, ON
      • Quality Farms, ON
      • Frank Barkey & Family, ON
    • Dairy Herd (4)
      • Kingsway Farm, ON
      • Crovalley Holsteins, ON
      • Vale O Skene Holsteins, ON
      • Frank Barkey & Family, ON
    • Grand Champion – Earlen Goldwyn Secret (Goldwyn), Ferme Yvon Sicard, Ferme Blondin & Ghyslain Demers, QC
    • Reserve Grand Champion – Roggua Dundee Evelyne (Dundee), Ferme Yvon Sicard & Ghyslain Demers, QC
    • HM Grand Champion – Cobequid Goldwyn Leno (Goldwyn), Ferme Yvon Sicard & Ghyslain Demers, QC
    • Premier Breeder – Kingsway Farms, ON
    • Premier Exhibitor – Crovalley Holsteins, ON
  • Ontario Summer Jersey Show
    Lindsay Ontario
    July 26th

    • Junior Calf (7)
      • Sikmas Tequila Sunrise (Tequila), Howard & Connor & Brent Sikma, ON
      • Avonlea Mischeif Made U Look (Hired Gun), Avonlea Genetics, ON
      • Garhaven Getaway Dayton (Getaway), Tim Hunt, ON
    • Intermediate Calf (8)
      • Buckland Tequila Lexicon (Tequila), Scott & Nathan Honey & Sandra Osborne, ON
      • Stee La Minister Flavie (Minister), Laurent Lambert, S Lambert, Weavercroft Int & L&L Pires, ON
      • Jaspar Colton Chocolate (Colton), Randy & Tara Bullock, ON
    • Senior Calf (16)
      • Charlyn Reagan Rosebud (Reagan), Charlyn Jerseys, ON
      • Glenholme Request Tirumph (Request), Robert & Bruce Mellow, ON
      • Avonlea Gator Kimber (Gator), Avonlea Genetics Inc., ON
    • Summer Yearling (6)
      • RJF Gator Chloe (Gator), Robert Jarrell, ON
      • Charlyn Perennial Tequila Nite (Tequila), Charlyn Jerseys & Bryan Weldrick, ON
      • RJF Ragan Raptor (Reagan), Robert Jarrell, ON
    • Junior Yearling (8)
      • Avonlea Reagan Venus (Reagan), Avonlea Genetics, ON
      • Bridgeview Money Impala (On the Money), Bridgeview Farms, ON
      • Marlau Socrates Arcadios (Socrates), Laurent Lambert, QC
    • Junior Champion of 4-H Show – Glenholme Request Tirumph (Request), Robert & Bruce Mellow, ON (Curtis Ruta 4-H)
    • Reserve Junior Champion of 4-H Show – Huronia RBR Cherish (Reagan), Hollylane Jerseys, ON (4-H Courney Ray)
    • Intermediate Yearling (2)
      • Avonlea CF Silk (Socrates)  Avonlea Genetics Inc & Cybil Fisher, ON & WI
      • Avonlea CF Satin (Socrates), Robert Jarrell, ON
    • Senior Yearling (3)
      • RJF Unique Ontime Marathon (On time), Robert Jarrell & Unique Stock Farms, ON & AB
      • Lone Pine ONtime Believe (Ontime), Avonlea Genetics & Anselmo Vasconsellos, ON & Brazil
      • RJF Iatola Blistex (Iatola), Robert Jarrell, ON
    • Junior Champion of the Open Show – RJF Unique Ontime Marathon (On time), Robert Jarrell & Unique Stock Farms, ON & AB
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Open Show – Avonlea CF Silk (Socrates)  Avonlea Genetics Inc & Cybil Fisher, ON & WI
    • HM Junior Champion – Charlyn Reagan Rosebud (Reagan), Charlyn Jerseys, ON
    • Junior 2 Year Old (11)
      • Arethusa Ontime Vogue (Ontime), Whiskey River, ON
      • Enniskillen BV Suzy (Vincent), Enniskillen Jerseys, ON
      • Pleasant Nook Iatola Fancy (Iatola), Pleasant Nook Jerseys, ON
    • Senior 2 Year Old (10)
      • Huronia Vincent Mindy (Vincent), Robert Jarrell, ON
      • Lorivale Excitation Carousel (Excitation), Lorivale Jerseys, ON
      • Terrace Bank Telina (Iatola), Ferme Elegance & Denis Fossaert, QC
    • Junior 3 Year Old (3)
      • (BU) RJF Blackstone Illusion (Blackstone), Robert Jarrell, ON
      • Avonlea JK Kool Kat (Jacknife), Avonlea Genetics, ON
      • Garhaven Iatola Daydream (Iatola), Tim Hunt, ON
    • Intermediate Champion – Arethusa Ontime Vogue (Ontime), Whiskey River, ON
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion – Enniskillen BV Suzy (Vincent), Enniskillen Jerseys, ON
    • HM Intermediate Champion – RJF Blackstone Illusion (Blackstone), Robert Jarrell, ON
    • Senior 3 Year Old (8)
      • Pleasant Nook Giller Caprice (Giller), Pleasant Nook Jerseys, ON
      • Avonlea Jade Reba (Jade), Avonlea Genetics, ON
      • Hiddendream Blackstone River (Blackstone), Laurent Lambert, QC
    • 4 Year old (6)
      • Peninsula Barbaro’s Drama (Barbaro), Jake & Annie Vander Meulen, ON
      • RJF Iatola Sadie ( Iatola), Robert Jarrell, ON
      • Charlyn Nevada Emma(Nevada), Charlyn Jerseys, ON
    • 5 Year Old (9)
      • Payneside Sig Paris (Signature), Ferme Elegance & Denis Fossaert, QC
      • Fletchdale Sultan Tess (Sultan), Laurent Lambert, QC
      • Shantals CGar Shiloh (CGar), Avonlea Genetics & Cybil Fisher, ON & WI
    • Mature Cow (5)
      • Enniskillen Respect Suzy (Respect), Enniskillen Jerseys, ON
      • Glen Caro Nan 2 (Millenium), Cybil Fisher, Trent Valley & Jason Mell, ON & WI
      • Hollylane Halmark Emma (Hallmark), Hollylane Jerseys, ON
    • Grand Champion – Payneside Sig Paris (Signature), Ferme Elegance & Denis Fossaert, QC
    • Reserve Grand Champion – Peninsula Barbaro’s Drama (Barbaro), Jake & Annie Vander Meulen, ON
    • HM Grand Champion – Arethusa Ontime Vogue (Ontime), Whiskey River, ON
    • Premier Breeder & Exhibitor – RJ Farms, ON
    • Runner up for Premier Breeder & Exhibitor –
    • Enniskillen Jerseys, ON
  • Wisconsin Championship Show
    July 16, 2012
    Marshfield, WI
    Judge: Brian Carscadden, ON

    • Spring Calf (14)
      • Siemers Gwyn Glam Thisup (Goldwyn), C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, WI
      • Siemers Braxton Alexa-ET (Braxton), C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, WI
      • (1st Jr.) MS GenTerRaetion SK Cha Cha (Shamrock), P, H, L & M WI
    • Winter Calf (24)
      • Siemers Destry Joy-Red-ET (Destry), C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, WI
      • (1st Jr) Hobby-Hill Apple Lana (Big-Apple-Red), Riley Miller, WI
      • Bella-Ridge Go For It-ET (Braxton), Lynn & Sarah Harbaugh 7 Kurt & Sara Loehr, WI
    • Fall Calf (23)
      • (1st Jr) Siemers Dstry Sunraygal-ET (Destry, C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, WI
      • D-Force GW Atwood Anaconda (Atwood), Orville Kemink, Brandon, WI
      • Budjon-JK Atwood Elex-ET (Atwood), Budjon Farms & Joel Kietzman, , WI
    • Summer Yearling (13)
      • Stranshome Goldwyn Saffron (Goldwyn), Jordan & Whitney Ebert, WI
      • (1st Jr) Siemers Fvr Hiadream-ET (Fever), C, J, J, J, C, & L Siemers, WI
      • Lyn-Vale Jasper Geneva (Jasper), William A. Schultz, WI
    • Spring Yearling (9)
      • Crackholm Fever Heat Island (Fever), MilkSource Genetics, WI
      • Budjon-JK Damion Essence-ET (Damion), Harbaugh, Ryan & Ebert, WI
      • (1st Jr) Vellhaven Ali Braxton Miracle (Braxton), C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, WI
    • Winter Yearling (15)
      • Scientific Donatella Rae-ET (Braxton), Matthew Nunes, Chippewa Falls, WI
      • Siemers Dundee Goldn-One-ET (Goldwyn), C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, , WI
      • Duckett P Lucky-Red-ET (Picolo), MilkSource Genetics, WI
    • Fall Yearling (15)
      • (1st Jr) Tomkins Mr Burns Sizzle-Red (Mr Burns), Brodie Bunkelman, WI
      • Unique Alexander Resist (Alexander), MilkSource Genetics,, WI
      • Charwill Attic Mary (Attic), Peter & Lynn Vail & Budjon Farms, WI
    • Junior Champion of the Junior Show – Siemers Dstry Sunraygal-ET (Destry), 1st Fall Calf, C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, WI
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Junior Show – Tomkins MrBurns Sizzle-Red (Mr Burns), 1st Fall Yearling, Brodie Bunkelman, WI
    • Junior Champion of the Open Show – Stranshome Gold Saffron (Goldwyn), 1st Summer Yearling, Jordan & Whitney Ebert, WI
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Open Show – Siemers Dstry Sunraygal-ET (Destry), 1st Fall Calf, C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, WI
    • Junior 2-Year-Old (11)
      • Mel-Rob Sanchez Milly (Sanchez), Peter & Lyn Vail & Budjon Farms, WI
      • Cavanaleck Lana Rae-ET (Goldwyn), C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, WI
      • Ehrhardt Gold Beauty-ET (Goldwyn), Peter & Lyn Vail & Budjon Farms, WI
    • Senior 2-Year-Old (17)
      • (BO) Budjon-Vail Gold Dreams-ET (Goldwyn), Peter & Lyn Vail & Budjon Farms, WI
      • (BU) Wales Vibe Calamity (VR Vibe), Milksource Genetics, WI
      • Vision-Gen Snz Whip A770-ET (Sanchez), C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, WI
    • Junior 3-Year-Old (14)
      • (BU) Eastside Talent Cam (Talent-Imp-ET), Premium Star, Herman & Kathleen Hoffman, WI
      • (BO, 1st Jr) Fischerdale Damion Reality (Erbacres Damion), Elizabeth Sarbacker, WI
      • Quad-R Lyman Mustang (Comestar Lyman), Ryan & Tanya Smith, WI
    • Senior 3-Year-Old (7)
      • (BU) (1st Jr) Siemers Goldwyn Goldie ( Goldwyn), Jordan & Whitney Ebert, WI
      • Benrise Goldwyn JoJo ( Goldwyn), Peter & Lyn Vail & Budjon Farms, WI
      • Glendyer Goldwyn Gwn (Goldwyn), Jason & Ami Lasecki, WI
    • Intermediate Champion – Siemers Goldwyn Goldie-ET (Goldwyn), 1st senior 3-year-old, Jordan & Whitney Ebert, WI
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion – Benrise Goldwyn Jojo (Goldwyn), 2nd senior 3-year-old, Peter & Lyn Vail & Budjon Farms, WI
    • HM IntermediateHM In Champion – Mel-Rob Sanchez Milly (Goldwyn), 1st junior 2-year-old, Peter & Lyn Vail & Budjon Farms, WI
    • 4 Year Old (10)
      • (BU) Milksource Goldwyn Africa (Goldwyn), Peter & Lyn Vail & Budjon Farms, WI
      • Oakvale Advent Cinnabar-Red (Advent-Red), Milksource, WI
      • Blondin Jasper Billabing (Jasper), Kyle Natzke & Nick Schuster, WI
    • 5 Year Old (8)
      • (BU) Scientific Gold Dana Rae (Goldwyn), Budjon, Kietzman & Woodmansee, WI
      • Ms Del-Hollow Javent-Red-ET (Advent-Red), Kyle Natzke & Kyle Demmer, WI
      • Pyramid Goldwyn Shimmer-ET (Goldwyn), Jordan & Whitney Ebert, WI
    • Aged Cows (3)
      • Luck-E Dundee Jenna (Dundee), Milksource, WI
      • (BU) Hylite SS Alasandra (September Storm), Andy Sell & Mitch Immel, WI
      • Melarry Atlanta Nancy (Atlanta), Jenna Langer, WI
    • 125,000 Pound Cows (6)
      • (BU) Siemers Alisha Gold Ava-ETS (Goldwyn), Crystal Siemers-Peterman, WI
      • Kelroys Rubens Vivian (Rubens), Chad & Mark Ryan & Brian Kelroy, WI
      • Four-of-a-Kind Best Peg-ET (Best), Four-of-a-Kind Partners, WI
    • Best Bred & Owned of the Open & Jr. Show – Siemers Alisha Gold Ava-ETS (Goldwyn), 1st 125,000 Lbs Cow, Crystal Siemers-Peterman, WI
    • Senior & Grand Champion of the Jr. Show – Siemers Alisha Gold Ava-ETS (Goldwyn), Crystal Siemers-Peterman, WI
    • Reserve Senior & Reserve Grand Champion of the Jr. Show – Siemers Goldwyn Goldie-ET (Goldwyn), 1st senior 3-year-old, Jordan & Whitney Ebert, WI
    • HM Senior & HM Grand Champion of the Jr. Show – Ms Del-Hollow Javent-Red-ET (Advent-Red), Kyle Natzke & Kyle Demmer, WI
    • Senior & Grand Champion of the Open Show – Milksource Goldwyn Africa (Goldwyn), (1st 4 Year Old), Peter & Lyn Vail & Budjon Farms, WI
    • Reserve Senior & Reserve Grand Champion of the Open Show – Scientific Gold Dana Rae (Goldwyn), (1st 5 Year Old), Budjon, Kietzman & Woodmansee, WI
  • Expo de Portneuf Holstein Show
    July 20-21, 2012
    86 Head

    •  Junior Champion – Petitclerc Sid Sunkiss (Sid), 1st Summer Yearling, FERME JEAN-PAUL PETITCLERC & FILS INC, QC
    • Reserve Junior Champion – Petitclerc Goldwyn Sidney (Goldwyn), 1st Intermediate Calf, Ferme Jean-Paul Petitclerc & Fils Inc, QC
    • HM Junior Champion – Petitclerc Goldwyn Silver (Goldwyn), 2nd Intermediate Calf, Ferme Jean-Paul Petitclerc & Fils Inc, QC
    • Grand Champion – Bonaccueil Maya Goldwyn (Goldwyn), 1st 5 Year Old, Ty-D Holsteins, Drolet & Fils, Ferme Jacobs Inc ET A & R Boulet Inc., QC
    • Reserve Champion – Friesia Goldwyn Lainey (Goldwyn), 2nd 5 Year Old, Ferme Geno Inc. Et Ferme Kamlake, QC
    • HM Grand Champion – Petitclerc Goldwyn Flamigo (Goldwyn), 1st Junior 2 Year Old, Ferme Jean-Paul Petitclerc & Fils Inc., QC
  • Western PA Championship Holstein Show
    July 14, 2012
    Lawrence County Fairgrounds
    Judge Denny Patrick
    165 headed

    • Spring Calf (13)
      • Plum-Line Sanchez Kellie (Sanchez x Plum-Line Gibson Krackle), Patrick Carey
      • Daydreamer Deuce Claire-Red, Lindsey Beatty Henry
      • Plum-Line Sid Lettie, Brooke Carey
    • Winter Calf (20)
      • Plum-Line Advent Gem (Advent x Plum-Line RM Glitter), Patrick Carey
      • Conno-Q Sanchez Flirt, Leighton Meals
      • Clayholm Attic Devon, Clayholm Farms LLC
    • Fall Calves (19)
      • Mases Manor AS Quicksilver (Aftershock x Simpsons Energizer Quilt), Garrett & Maggie Mase
      • Erinwood Windbrook Loverae-ET, Tom & Erin Uber & J. Travis Couch
      • Mases Manor Ross Quincy, Alyssa Campbell
    • Summer Yearling (15)
      • Red-Springs Atwood Jordyn (Atwood x Red-Springs Damion Jewel), Justin Kennedy
      • E-Ricks Asteroid Apache, Harold Rader Jr. & Alex Claypool
      • Peachy Palermo Indy, Mike & Vanessa Uber
    • Spring Yearling (12)
      • Lawrence-Haven Laramee Dora (Laramee x Oakdale Dundee Denise-ET), Wyatt Lawrence
      • Rolling-Spring Sanchez Ella, Charles Bean
      • Hillmont Sanchez Marie, Justin Kennedy
    • Winter Yearling (12)
      • Gretz Sanchez Avatra, Sarah Cambell
      • Lawrence-Haven Perseus Val, Ian Taylor Lawrence
      • Alright Elmo Razzy, Kyle Wright
    • Fall Yearling (12)
      • MS Duckett Jasper Magic, Black Magic Syndicate
      • Craggon Goldwyn Dime, Chad McConnell, Garrett & Maggie Mase
      • Alright FC Kelsy, Katelyn Neff
    • Junior Champion Open Show – 1st Junior Yearling: Lawrence-Haven Laramee Dora, Wyatt Lawrence
    • Reserve Junior Champion Open Show – Plum-Line Advent Gem, Patrick Carey
    • Junior Champion Junior Show – 1st Fall Calf: Plum-Line Advent Gem, Patrick Carey
    • Reserve Junior Champion Junior Show – 1st Summer Yearling: Red-Springs Atwood Jordyn, Justin Kennedy
    • Fall Yearling in Milk
      • MS Rolling-Spring Esteem-ET (Laurin x Budjon-JK Exquisite-ET), Charles Bean
    • Junior 2 Year Old (4)
      • Plum-Line Aspen Karamel (Aspen x Plum-Line Gibson Krackle), Patrick Carey
      • Plum-Line Rubens Darcy, Plum-Line Holsteins
      • Boqurt Director Ruby-Red, Megan McQuaide
    • Senior 2 Year Old (12)
      • Fieldstone Silver Sachet-ET (Goldwyn x Fieldstone Silver Solace-ET), Marburger Farm Dairy
      • Sold-Gold Gold Euro, Spencer Weimer
      • Rolling-Springs Spear Spark, Charles Bean
    • Junior 3 Year Old (10)
      • C-Cove Denison Lani-ET (Denison x GCS Durham Lisa), Matt & Angela Lawrence
      • Miss March Madness, Richard Henry & Sarah Cambell
      • Peachey Tundel Iris, Mike & Vanessa Uber
    • Senior 3 Year Old (11)
      • Highland-H Champion Cabaret-ET (Champion x Highland-H Durham Cameo-ET), Mike & Vanessa Uber
      • Rolling-Spring Electric-ET, Heather Bean
      • Fran-Kee Aden Ava, Paige Nye
    • Intermediate Champion Open Show – Highland-H Champ Caberet-ET, Mike & Vanessa Uber
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion Open Show – C-Cove Denison Lani-ET, Matt & Angela Lawrence
    • Intermediate Champion Junior Show – Plum-Line Aspen Karamel, Patrick Carey
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion Junior Show – Fran-Kee Aden Ava, Paige Nye
    • 4 Year Olds (10)
      • Le-Ara Sovereign Rudy-TW (Sovereign x Le-Ara Brass Prudy), Tim Sturgeon & Family
      • MS Plum-Line Aspen Libby, Plum-Line Holsteins
      • Carday-Pride Gibson Lynn, Carlton Miller
    • 5 Year old (3)
      • Rolling-Spring Da Janeile (Damion x Elm-Brint Mtoto Julia-ET), Heather Bean
      • GH Simpson Damion Selma, Justin Simpson
      • Rolling-Spring Decker Snowy, Brady Dumont
    • Aged Cow (8)
      • Plum-Line Gibson Krackle (Gibson x Plum-Line Kit Kat), Patrick Carey
      • Rolling-Spring CL Splash-ET, Matthew Bean
      • Martinholm AA Mattie Ann, Martinholm Holsteins
    • 125,000lb Cow (2)
      • Highland-H Sully Scout (Highland-H Lee Sully x Highland-H Leduc Secret), Christy Hindman
      • Red-Vision Doe-Red-ET, Jolene Nicoletto
    • Senior and Grand Champion Open Show – Le-Ara Sovereign Rudy-TW, Tim Sturgeon & Family
    • Reserve Senior and Reserve Grand Champion Open Show – Plum-Line Gibson Krackle, Patrick Carey
    • Senior and Grand Champion Junior Show – Plum-Line Gibson Krackle, Patrick Carey
    • Reserve Senior and Reserve Grand Champion Junior Show – Rolling-Spring D Eccentric-ET, Morgan Gooch
    • Premier Breeder – Rolling-Spring, Charles Bean & Family
    • Premier Exhibitor – Plum-Line Holsteins, the Carey Family
  • Western Pennsylvania Red & White Championship Show
    July 14, 2012
    Judge: Denny Patrick
    43 Head

    • Junior Champion – Daydreamer Deuce Claire-Red, 1st Spring Calf, Lindsey Beatty Henry
    • Reserve Junior Champion – Starmark White Rose-Red, 1st Spring Yearling, Starmark
    • Grand Champion – Lawrence-Haven Vixen-Red, 1st Senior 2 Year Old, Ian Taylor Lawrence
    • Reserve Champion – Martinholm Redman Sunny-Red, 1st Aged Cow, Martinholm Holsteins
  • Frederick-Montgomery Co. Holstein District Show
    July 19, 2012
    Judge: Dave Lease, MD

    • Junior Champion – Knob-View Atwood Katlyn-ET (Atwood), 1st Winter Yearling, Richard Kepler
    • Reserve Junior Champion – M-Riverview Damion Ruby (Damion), 1st Fall Yearling, Scott Hood & David Eigenbrode
    • Grand Champion – Knob-View Sanchez Kayley (Sanchez), 1st Senior 2 Year Old, Richard Kepler
    • Reserve Champion -Glen-Toctin Sanchez Dara (Sanchez), 2nd Senior 2 Year Old, Katelyn Allen
  • Illinois State Holstein Show
    July 20, 2012
    Judge: Chris Hill, MD
    Lincoln, IL

    • Spring Calf (7)
      • Roll-N-View Fever Brand-ET (Crackholm Fever-ET), Caitlin & Blake Meyer and Megan Rohe, IL
      • MS Im An Angel-ET (Mr. Chassity Gold Chip-ET), Connor Erbsen, IL
      • B-J-Grove Confirm Sex Tim (Ralma Confirm-ET), Lucas Clanton, IL
    • Winter Calf (11)
      • MS Gold Chip Bright-ET (Mr Chassity Gold Chip-ET), Jeff Butler & Amanda Kennedy, IL
      • Elder-V Avatar Athena-Red (Mr Apples Avatar-ET), Erbsen, Opperman & Lenkaitis, IL
      • Lylehaven Atwood Dreamer (Maple-Downs-I GW Atwood-ET), Brett Woker, IL
    • Fall Calf (17)
      • MS Atwood Adrenaline (Maple-Downs I GW Atwood-ET), Jeff Butler, IL
      • Lake-Prairie Alison-Red-ET (KHW Kite Advent-Red), Marvin & Joe Schluter, IL
      • R-Vision Lauth Duplicate-ET (Comestar Lauthority-ET), Emily Irwin, IL
    • Summer Yearling (5)
      • Milksource Fever Golden (Crackholm Fever-ET), Jeff Butler, IL
      • Erbacres Chicago Lottery (Erbacres Goldwyn Chicago), Kevin Erbsen, IL
      • Erbacres Dempsey Ericka (Lirr Drew Dempsey), Erbsen, Opperman & Wakely, IL
    • Spring Yearling (5)
      • Headwater Lheros Juliet (Comestar Lheros), Caitlin & Blake Meyer & Miles Price, IL
      • BVK Atwood Alex-ET (Maple Downs-I GW Atwood), Miles Price, IL
      • Erbacres Atwood Sunkist (Maple Downs-I GW Atwood), Payton Erbsen, IL
    • Winter Yearling (6)
      • Erbacres Hope of Peace-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Connor Erbsen, IL
      • Bri-Mel Erstead Layal-ET (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), Caitlin & Blake Meyer & Miles Price, IL
      • Erbacres Love of Peace-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Erbsen, Opperman & Wakely, IL
    • Fall Yearling (9)
      • Pellerat Jasper Ginger-ET (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), Jeff Butler, IL
      • MS Ecstasys Encore-ET (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), Ludwig Farms, IL
      • Luck-E Braxton Maeve (Regancrest S Braxton-ET), Dalton Engel, IL
    • Junior Champion Bred & Owned – Erbacres Hope of Peace-ET, 1st winter yearling, Connor Erbsen
    • Reserve Junior Champion Bred & Owned – Erbacres Chicago Lottery, 1st B&O summer yearling
    • Junior Champion – Pellerat Jasper Ginger-ET (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), 1st fall yearling, Jeff Butler, IL
    • Reserve Junior Champion – Milksource Fever Golden (Crackholm Fever-ET), 1st summer yearling, Jeff Butler, IL
    • HM Junior Champion – MS Gold Chip Bright-ET (Mr Chassity Gold Chip-ET), 1st winter calf, Jeff Butler & Amanda Kennedy, IL
    • Junior Best Three (1)
    • 2-year-old futurity (13)
      • Erbacres Goldwyn Cotton (Braedale Goldwyn), Kevin Erbsen, IL
      • Erbacres Ad Lacross-Red (KHW Kite Advent-Red), Carla Erbsen Mickey, IL
      • Erbacres Advent Muffin (KHW Kite Advent-Red), Nathan Erbsen, IL
    • Junior 2-year-old (12)
      • BVK Atwood Arianna-ET (Maple-Downs I GW Atwood-ET), Jeff Butler & MB Lucklady Farm, IL & CA
      • Swanee-Acres Sho Ectasy (Patience Showline Contender-Red), Jason Swanson, IL
      • Erbacres Ad Lacross-Red (KHW Kite Advent-Red-ET), Carla Erbsen Mickey, IL
    • Senior 2-year-old (9)
      • Boisblanc Jasper Cristala (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), Jeff Butler, IL
      • Erbacres Goldwyn Cotton (Braedale Goldwyn), Kevin Erbsen, IL
      • Korian Goldwyn Sun-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Katelyn Dugan, IL
    • Junior 3-year-old (7)
      • Ludwigs-DG Goldwyn Ellie-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Ludwig Farms, IL
      • Ludwigs-DG Goldwyn Emmy-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Ludwig Farms, IL
      • Lindale Affirmed Kinsey (BKB Affirmed-ET), Dale and Linda Drendel, IL
    • Senior 3-year-old (14)
      • Golden-Oaks Plaid 4830 (Windy-Knoll-View Plaid), Golden Oaks Farm, IL
      • Golden-Oaks Dundee 4891 (Regancrest Dundee), Golden Oaks Farm, IL
      • Pierstein Goldwyn Maya (Braedale Goldwyn), Ben Sauder, IL
    • Intermediate Champion – BVK Atwood Arianna-ET (Maple-Downs I GW Atwood-ET), 1st Jr. 2-year-old, Jeff Butler & MB Lucklady Farm, IL & CA
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion – Ludwigs-DG Goldwyn Ellie-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st Jr. 3-year-old, Ludwig Farms, IL
    • HM Intermediate Champion – Ludwigs-DG Goldwyn Emmy-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), 2nd Jr. 3-year-old, Ludwig Farms, IL
    • 4-year-old (3)
      • Lindale Advent Dulcie (KHW Kite Advent-Red), Dale & Linda Drendel, IL
      • Team Aspen Michele-ET (EK-Oseeana Aspen-ET), Dale & Linda Drendel, IL
      • Bluff-Ridge Roy Baretta (Roylane Jordan), Sarah Butler, IL
    • 5-year-old Futurity (4)
      • Team Durham Morgan (Regancrest Elton Durham), Team Holsteins, IL
      • Lindale Aspen Maybelle (EK-Oseeana Aspen-ET), Dale & Linda Drendel, IL
      • Bluff-Ridge Roy Jessie-ET (Roylane Jordan), Sarah Butler, IL
    • 5-year-old (6)
      • MS Dundee Belinda (Regancrest Dundee), Jeff Butler, IL
      • Team Durham Morgan (Regancrest Elton Durham), Team Holsteins, IL
      • Kagwick Durham Suzy (Regancrest Elton Durham), Dale & Linda Drendel, IL
    • Aged Cow (3)
      • Gundys Alise (Silky Gibson), Robert Gunderson, IL
      • Hicklee Goldwyn Good-TW-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Team Holsteins & Jason Swanson, IL
      • Kalmeys Roy Piehe (Roylane Jordan), Erdman Dairy, IL
    • 125,000 lb. cow (3)
      • Exels Goldwyn Anna-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Legendholm & Norm Nabholz, IL & IA
      • Gardner Durham Medusa (Regancrest Elton Durham), Dale & Linda Drendel, IL
      • B-J Grove Champion Hoover (Calbrett-I HH Champion), Casey Clanton & Miranda Kollmann, IL
    • Senior & Grand Champion – MS Dundee Belinda (Regancrest Dundee), 1st 5-year-old, Jeff Butler, IL
    • Reserve Senior & Reserve Grand Champion – Exels Goldwyn Anna-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st 125,000 lb. cow, Legendholm & Norm Nabholz, IL & IA
    • Premier Breeder – Erbacres
    • Premier Exhibitor – Lindale Holsteins
  • Connecticut Holstein Show
    July 23, 2012
    Judge: Doug Wolfe
    74 Head Shown

    • Junior Champion of the Open Show – MS Atlees Shot Aleena (Shottle), 1st Spring Yearling, R&S Allyn, J Lloyd, M Heath
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Open Show – Powder-Mill Roy Tia Lynn (Roy), 1st Summer Yearling, John & Ashley Collins
    • HM Junior Champion of the Open Show – Devans Lindsey (Sid), 1st Winter Calf, Justine Allyn
    • Junior Champion of the Junior Show – Devans Lindsey (Sid), 1st Winter Calf, Justine Allyn
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Junior Show – R-E-W Sapphire-ET, 2nd Winter Calf, Michael & Max Wolf
    • Grand Champion of the Open Show – MS Rocklan Shottle Tippy (Shottle), 1st Junior 3 Year Old, R&S Allyn, B Murphy, S Culbertson
    • Reserve Grand Champion & Best Udder of the Open Show – Combination September Sushi (September Storm), 1st Aged Cow, Rick &Dori Wolf
    • HM Grand Champion of the Open Show – BVK Atwood Andrea (Atwood), 1st Junior 2 Year Old, R&S Allyn, J Lloyd, M Heath
    • Grand Champion of the Junior Show – Cedar Rail BWML Hooray, 1st Senior 3 Year Old, Casey Wolf
    • Reserve Grand Champion of the Junior Show – MS Duckett Dolman Sandra (Dolamn), 1st Senior 2 Year Old, Max Wolf
    • Premier Breeder & Exhibitor – Schilldale/Tiffany
  • All-Oregon Holstein Show
    July 14, 2012
    Tillamook, OR
    Judge: Adam Van Exel, Lodi, CA
    80 Head Shown

    • Junior Champion of the Junior Show – Mistvale Advent Robyn-Red (Advent), 1st Winter Yearling, Staci Sherer
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Junior Show – TMK Sanchez Honkey (Sanchez), 1st Fall Calf, Katie Sherer
    • HM Junior Champion of the Junior Show – Mistvale Melky Shani, 1st Winter Calf, Rylee Armstrong
    • Junior Champion of the Open Show –  Crazy-For Damion Tickle (Damion), 1st Fall Calf, Kenny Coppini
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Open Show – Sculpture-Of San Enhance, 1st Spring Yearling, TMK Farm
    • HM Junior Champion of the Open Show – Crazy-For Contender Stylin (Contender), 1st Summer Yearling, Kenny Coppini
    • Intermediate Champion – Juniper-Haven A Raja-Red-ET, 1st Senior 2 Year Old, Juniper-Haven
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion – Danielle-L Sanchez Alise-ET (Sanchez), 1st Junior 2 Year Old, Gracie Krahn
    • HM Intermediate Champion – Crazy-For Sept Delirious-TW (September Storm), 1st Senior 3 Year Old, Kenny Coppini
    • Senior & Grand Champion of the Junior Show – Western-Lite Sanchez Dally (Sanchez), Missy Moretti
    • Reserve Senior & Grand Champion of the Junior Show – Premium-Farms Amaz Noel-Red, Missy Moretti
    • HM Senior & Grand Champion of the Junior Show – Hale-Valley Rubens Jigalow (Rubens), Jason Hale
    • Senior Champion of the Open Show – Crazy-For Advent Dazzle (Advent), 1st 4 Year Old, Kenny Coppini
    • Reserve Senior Champion of the Open Show – Cazy-For Durham Lil Lea-ET (Durham), 1st 5 Year Old, Kenny Coppini
    • HM Senior Champion of the Open Show – Midway Dundee Dazzle (Dundee), 1st Aged Cow, Midway Dairy
    • Grand Champion of the Open Show – Crazy-For Advent Dazzle (Advent), 1st 4 Year Old, Kenny Coppini
    • Reserve Grand Champion of the Open Show – Juniper-Haven A Raja-Red, 1st Senior 2 Year Old, Juniper-Haven
    • HM Grand Champion of the Open Show – Cazy-For Durham Lil Lea-ET (Durham), 1st 5 Year Old, Kenny Coppini
  • Michigan State Holstein Show
    July 20, 2012
    Michigan State University in East Lansing
    Judge: Eric Top, OH

    • Spring Calf
      • Cass-Ridge Palermo Spring , Paul Beiler
      • Tri-Koebel Gwn Warrior-ET,Greta Koebel, MI
      • Preston Dempsey Fawn, Jenna Beeker,
    • Winter Calf
      • Hardys Braxton Spice-ET, Hardys Holsteins, MI
      • EK-SYJ Lauthority Bijou-ET, Spencer Weimer, PA
      • Tumbleweed Powerplay Divine, Nugent, Nugent and Burkhardt, MI
    • Fall Calf
      • Co-Vista Digger Dreamy-ET, Levi Westendorp, MI
      • Gibbs Attack Lone Rock, Parker Hardy,, MI
      • MS Tri-Koebel Go-Getter, King Street Holsteins,
    • Summer Yearling
      • Siemers Fvr Hayla-Queen-ET, Spencer Weimer, PA
      • Heaths Got Potential, Todd Watts, , MI
      • Class-E Atwood Cashew-ET, Eric Moser, MI
    • Spring Yearling Heifer
      • Mapel Wood Fever Bombino, Hardys Holsteins, MI
      • SJ-Reed Sanchez Barracuda, Marcus Reed, MI
      • Star-Summit Mitch Renita, Star-Summit, MI
    • Winter Yearling
      • SRD-IL Fremont Brina-ET, Lucas Moser,, MI
      • Tri-Koebel Sanchez Winter-ET, Greta Koebel, , MI
      • Freelands Glen Hamms, Todd Watts, MI
    • Fall Yearling
      • Crooked Tree JLF Gold Medal, Ian Black, Joe Domecq,
      • Siemers Sanchez Happy Gal-ET, Spencer Weimer, PA
      • Class-E Classic Cheddar-ET, Lucas Moser, MI
    • Junior Champion of the Junior Show – Siemers Fvr Hayla-Queen-ET, Spencer Weimer, PA
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Junior Show – Crooked Tree JLF Gold Medal, Ian Black, Joe Domecq
    • Junior Champion of the Open Show – Siemers Fvr Hayla-Queen-ET, Spencer Weimer, PA
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Open Show – Co-Vista Digger Dreamy-ET, Levi Westendorp, MI
    • Great Lakes Futurity
      • Tri-Koebel Roy Elaborate, Greta Koebel, MI
      • Moram Cele Tanent Pip, Moram Holsteins, MI
      • Star-Summit L.P.T. Pauline, Star-Summit, MI
    • Junior Two Year Old
      • (BU) WOC-ZBW Atwood Skittles, Hardys Holsteins, MI
      • Hardys Jasper Diamond-ET, Parker Hardy, MI
      • Tumbleweed Debonair Birthday, Nugent, Nugent and Burkhardt, MI
    • Senior Two Year Old
      • Hardys Goldwyn Magenta-ET, Hardys Holsteins, Tipton, MI
      • Star-Summit Rhonda-Red, Star-Summit, Byron Center, MI
      • Posey-Creek Juror Ivy, Posy Creek Farm, North Adams, MI
    • Junior Three Year Old
      • (BU) Dutchline Cary, Hardys Holsteins, MI
      • Tri-Koebel Pagewire Muffin, Tera and Greta Koebel, MI
      • Hardys Talent Danika-ET, Parker Hardy, MI
    • Senior Three Year Old
      • Minsu Lyster Haywood, T&H Dairy,, MI
      • Green Meadow Roswell Jasinia, Green Meadow Farms, MI
      • Ri-Val-Re Sidney Wendy-ET, Nick Clark, MI
    • Intermediate Champion – WOC-ZBW Atwood Skittles, first junior 2,, Hardys Holsteins, MI
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion – Tri-Koebel Roy Elaborate, Futurity winner,, Greta Koebel, MI
    • Four Year Old
      • (BU) Little River Goldwyn Sandra, Hardys Holsteins, MI
      • Tri-Koebel Roy Fear None, Terry and Jennie Koebel, MI
      • Class L & E Fabulous Tina, Lucas Moser, MI
    • Five Year Old
      • (BU) Tri-Koebel Goldwyn Trophey, Eric Sneller, MI
      • Green Meadow Kari-ET, Justin Webster, MI
      • Leann-Acres Terrason Honey, Eric Sneller, MI
    • Aged Cow
      • Tri-Koebel Fear This-ET, Tera Koebel, MI
      • Green-Meadow Guston Lindsay, Long/Green, , MI
      • Hardys Durham Dolly, Parker Hardy, Tipton, MI
    • 125,000lb Cow
      • Rod-er-Dic Durham Amy, Rod-er-Dic Farm, MI
      • Green Meadow Rolex Allie, Kelvin Webster, MI
    • Senior Champion and Grand Champion – Little River Goldwyn Sandra, first 4 year old,, Hardys Holsteins, MI
    • Reserve Senior Champion and Reserve Grand Champion – Tri-Koebel Fear This-ET, first aged cow, Tera Koebel, MI
    • Senior and Grand Champion of the Junior Show – Tri-Koebel Fear This-ET, first aged cow, Tera Koebel, MI
    • Reserve Senior and Reserve Grand Champion of the Junior Show – Hardys Durham Dolly, second aged cow, Parker Hardy, Tipton, MI

Sales

  • Reflections of Maple Downs Sale
    • Lot 5 – $10,000 – Hobby-Acres Pronto Edge-ET VG-87 – Sr. 3yr Old pregnant to Fever x 2E-94 Durham x 3E-92 Progress x EX-91 Skychief
    • Lot 3 – $9750 – Ms Charos Duplex Carrie-ET EX-92 95-MS
    • Lot 89 – $9500 – Co-Vista Japser August – Milking 2yr Old sired by Jasper x Cranberry-Mdws D Appeal-ET VG-88
  • Maryland State Sale Highlights
    July 17, 2012
    McHenry, Maryland
    78 Full lots averaged $4,832

    • High Seller – Lot 2 $29,000 Locust Ayr C Mercy P Red Et, A flush age Red Polled Colt P with a GTPI of +2036 Buyer: San Dan Holsteins Consignor: Mike and Anita Haines
    • 2nd High Seller – Lot 4 $25,000 Ladys Manor GR Lachelle ET, A March 2012 Grafeeti with a GTPI of +2394 Consignor: My Ladys Manor Farm Buyer: Glen-Toctin Farm
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Categories : Show and Sale Recap

There has be so much talk lately, The Bullvine included, about how much the dairy breeding world has changed since the introduction of Genomics, that it has  me thinking, “What if genomics doesn’t pan out.  What if it doesn’t work as well as predicted?”

History is full of trends and inventions that the world thought would be amazing that in the end seemed nothing more than hype.  In recent history there has been foursquare (location based social network) and the Snuggie that, due to great marketing and an audience starved for something new, saw immediate rapid growth but lacked staying power.  Are genomics no better than the Snuggie?

While I must admit, I am sure there has been way more research and development behind genomics than there was behind the Snuggie, there are some significant areas that we have had to assume as musts that may turn out to bite us in the butt.  Such as:

  • Not a Perfect Science
    Because genomics are so new, this means that we have to operate on a number of assumptions.  As time goes on and more and more animals are tested, I am sure the accuracy will improve.
  • Limited Data
    While the ability to have genetic evaluations and recording systems provides genomics the ability to more accurately predict genetics merit far ahead of genomics in other animals or humans, it’s still in its infancy.  As more and more cattle are tested there will be more and more data to work from providing geneticists with greater accuracy in the systems they produce.
  • Hot House Effect
    While even we have written about how genomics has removed the hothouse effect (Has Genomics Knocked Out Hot House Herds?), does it really mean that it has been removed, or maybe it has just changed the game?  Maybe “shady” breeders just need to think of new ways to work the new system.

Is It Genomics or Is It You?

History is littered with wide scale aversion to new, disruptive technologies.  Thomas Edison turned down the radio because it had no commercial value; Western Union turned down the telephone because management thought ‘it will never be more than a toy’.  Can you believe that Thomas J. Watson Sr., founder and head of IBM, turned down the computer; and Kodak turned down the Xerox copier.  This makes me think of how many old school breeders are pissing on genomics (Old School Dairy Breeders – STOP PISSING ON GENOMICS) maybe more because of fear of change, than anything else.

May be you should also stop listening to the radio, talking on the telephone or taking pictures?  Now tell me how many cattle you’ll be marketing?

The Bullvine Bottom Line

There are no guarantees in life (well, I guess I should say with the exceptions of   death, taxes) and genomics is no different.  Genomics is not a perfect science, yet.  However, it does have a very sound scientific basis that, as time goes on, can be refined and enhanced.  For those who are afraid of genomics I ask you, are you afraid of genomics, or are you afraid of change?
The Dairy Breeders No BS Guide to Genomics

 

Not sure what all this hype about genomics is all about?

Want to learn what it is and what it means to your breeding program?

Download this free guide.

 

 

 

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How Dairy Cattle Judging Made Me Rich

Thursday, July 26th, 2012

No, I have not judged the Royal or Madison.  No, I have not bought or sold a Supreme Champion.  However, what I have gotten is worth far more, and has helped me become far richer than any of these things could have.  It gave me the confidence to be heard, the ability to know what I am talking about, and the skills to defend my position, and these three things have served me extremely well in my career.

With Ontario Summer Show & Dairy Cattle Evaluation Clinic coming up tomorrow and Friday it has me thinking about how fortunate I was to grow up and have the amazing opportunity to learn at these great events.  I  remember being 11 years old and poking my head around Lowell Lindsey or Orton Eby trying to get a look at the cattle.  I can also remember trying to stand as close as I could to Bert Stewart so that when he would pick someone to give reasons he would pick me.  The skills that I learned there have served me extremely well.  The following are three skills I learned at these evaluation clinics that have set my career on fire.

Public Speaking

There is no question the ability to speak well in public is a great skill to have.  Everyone always ask me why don’t you get nervous before speaking to crowds of five hundred and sometimes one thousand people?  I say, “Why that is easy. Try giving reasons on a class of Jersey 2 yr. olds after Court Carmichael has just given reasons on the class that you placed exactly opposite to his. Of course,  they do look at me kind of funny, but the point is, there has been no better place to learn how to speak in public than at these clinics.  I can tell you I  remember to this day the feeling I had when Orton Eby and Frank Donkers came over and said, good job kid.  I tell you I was on top of the world.  Two men that, to this day, I still think the world of, patting me on the back.  There could be nothing better.

I can never forget  the first time I went to Madison and heard the 4-H members from the US give their reasons.  Man, did they sound sweet and long.  “She is dairy from the tip of her nose to the tip of her tail,”  They have some good sayings that seem to roll off their tongues.  Fortunately, for me,  Bert Stewart was there telling me, “Just say what you see and leave all the other BS for them.”  Those experiences showed me that having the ability to articulate what you are saying and putting mental images in your audiences’ head can do wonders for bringing what you have to say to life.  Not only do you learn  to say that she has a “more desirable” set of feet and legs instead of “better”, but, you also gain the ability to clearly articulate what you are thinking.

Evaluation Skills

From having to hire sales people or selling  to some of the biggest tech companies in the country or building demand generation programs for extremely complex products, the ability to evaluate options is a skill everyone should have in their tool box.  Learning at these evaluation clinics the importance of a scorecard or understanding how subtle nuances can make the world of difference to overall conformation or profitability, has helped me understand the need for systems and processes for everything you do.

When I first started judging, I tried to do everything on gut feel.  Sure, I got lucky sometimes, but in order to build repeatable results you need to have systems in place that set you up for success.  That  starts with knowing what   the end result is aiming for  (the true type model) and then understanding what areas are where  the money is made (mammary systems) and what areas are  just for show (size and stature).

Confidence to Defend My Position

Some might say I have enough confidence to fill a sinking ship, others might call it arrogance. Either way, the ability to translate that “arrogance” into “confidence” comes from the lessons I learned during these dairy cattle evaluation clinics.  Knowing your reasons for why you believe one option is better than another one is and having the ability to defend your opinion, even under the most rigorous of scrutiny, is a skill all young people should have.

It’s a skill that will serve you well regardless of the career you choose. This is especially true of you go into a sales career, such as I have.  Knowing the reasons why one option is better than another is one thing, being able to convince others that it is, is even more important.  That skill has served me extremely well.  I have been fortunate to sell products from $1.99 to over 2 million and the one thing that is the same in all these processes is you must have  the ability to defend why your option is the best option for that specific prospect’s needs.  That’s a skill I learned at these clinics.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

From my first trip to the InterCounty 4-H  Judging Competition and winning top placings and still not making the Madison team, to my last trip and winning top reasons things sure did change as  a direct result of what I learned at the dairy cattle evaluation clinics.  However, more importantly, the lessons I learned at these clinics have served me in every facet of my career as I judge, show and sell in the arena of big business.  Rich indeed!

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Categories : The Bullvine

dairy cattle showing youthOne of the outstanding benefits of living on a dairy farm is that it provides the opportunity to learn how to compete in the dairy ring. Working with dairy animals improves physical fitness, coordination, self-discipline and teamwork, but these beneficial activities can also put participants at risk for injury.

Show-related injuries are preventable.  It is a matter of protecting bodies, while they are still growing and just beginning to understand the skills involved in working with animals. Unlike sports such as baseball or hockey where flying objects can cause injuries to the face, the danger in the show ring  most often lies in the child’s awareness of the living, and sometimes unpredictable, animal at the end of the lead.

Training of both the child and the animal is the key to avoiding injuries to both participants.  Of course, it is up to the adults in charge to make sure that youth participating in the events are safe from foreseeable harm.

Dairy Show Injury Prevention Tips

  • Dress participants in appropriate protective equipment. Most sports teams require participants to have specific equipment that is the proper size and adjusted to each athlete. We should do the same for young cattle show persons. Footwear that can withstand tromping on and that is safe from slipping in wet, muddy or messy conditions. Steel toed work boots are the safest choice. Flip flops, clogs and bare feet are strictly unacceptable when working with cattle.  If proper protective equipment isn’t available, it is NOT alright to go ahead.  It teaches two incorrect things: a- the rules don`t count  b- rules can be broken.
  • Proper halter size. A halter that is too big is dangerous as it can be easily pulled off. The halter should not cause discomfort to the calf. As well, make sure the lead shank is neither too long nor too short. This is where experience will be the best teacher but don`t let the handling of the halter or lead become a bigger job than moving easily with the calf.
  • Maintain safe show ring conditions. Wherever, cattle are being shown, basic safety precautions should be in place. Clear the area of debris. Beware of broken glass, rusty nails, used syringes, rocks and other items that would increase injury if a child fell or slid on them. If this will be an outdoor event, watch weather forecasts; have a set of guidelines for postponing the event, if necessary.
  • Have an emergency plan for injuries during shows. If at all possible have an adult trained in first aid techniques on hand. At least have an adult with a charged mobile phone. Provide the adult supervisor with a notebook of emergency phone numbers for parents or guardians of all participants. Carry a well-stocked first aid kit.
  • Enforce basic sportsmanship rules. This is the beginning of learning how to care for animals, prepare them for showing and putting forth their best feet forward in the ring. By all means, prevent bullying of competitors by adults or children. Young show persons need to focus on showing, not on their shame, embarrassment or humiliation.
  • Ensure children drink plenty of liquids. In the excitement of participating in this highlight of dairy cattle this may be overlooked and could result in dehydration. This is especially important in high heat, high humidity or high altitudes or with children who are novices and may not have experience in maintaining control of their animal for an extended time.
  • Provide proper training and skills building for young show people. Select a calf that will be a suitable size for the child to work with and show. Begin training as soon as possible. Training is not something that can be done in a couple of days! As the child builds fundamental skills, they will gain confidence in handling the calf and in presenting it for the judge`s consideration.
  • NEVER wrap the lead rope around the hand, arm, wrist or any body part. If they are bound like this and the heifer moves away quickly, the child could be seriously hurt.

THE BULLVINE BOTTOM LINE

When children are properly prepared to show dairy cattle, the skills they learn and mentors they meet will last them a lifetime. Safety first.  Memories forever.

When it comes to managing a profitable dairy herd, you have to place a high priority on mobility. If your cows are suffering from pain and discomfort when they try to walk, every other area from reproduction, to nutrition and milk production will be negatively affected.  Unfortunately, we often don’t identify the problem until it is so far along that treatment costs are high and recovery rates are low.

Step by Step: There are three main areas to address

  1. Observation and Detection
  2. Environment and Genetics
  3. Treatment and Medication

 

OBSERVATION AND DETECTION:

Of course, the goal is to reduce lameness to a zero percent occurrence.  Even if everyone observing the herd strives for this objective, it is a difficult job, especially if the animal to observer ratio is high.

  • Numerical Rating Scores (NRS) Work
    Studies on gait scoring or locomotion scoring are available to make assessment easier. Some research studies have gone a step further incorporating weight displacement analysis.  The use of a weight scale to read the weight displacement from one leg to another supports the observation that lame cows in standing position will remove weight on their injured leg by transferring body weight to the opposite (contralateral) leg.  These studies are scored from video recordings, some of which are available on the Internet and are quite helpful in identifying and understanding observable characteristics of lameness. Researchers recorded gait scores and weight transfer before and after they injected a local anaesthetic (lidocaine) to healthy and lame lactating dairy cows. Results showed that 92% of cows with sole ulcers were correctly identified. For the day-to-day dairy operator, it will still come down to personal observation which is not perfectly accurate.  In the always evolving age of technology, it probably won’t be long until an automated system is available to measure the weight distribution on each hoof, while cattle are in a holding area or milking stall.
  • Administering anesthetic
    Lame cows treated with anesthetic demonstrated less weight transfer to healthy limbs, as indicated by both gait scoring and a scale that measured weight borne by each limb. It was found that, before injection of the anaesthetic, lame cows were transferring more weight from the injured leg to the contralateral leg, and they also had a higher gait score than healthy cows. After injection of the anaesthetic, the gait score of lame cows decreased and the animals reduced the weight transfer from the injured leg to the contralateral leg. The study concludes that the two methods of detecting lameness have some degree of validity.
  • Lame Cows Stand Apart in Other Ways Too
    When an animal has sore feet, it affects other areas of their movement and how they move through their environment.  One study noted four non-foot areas that were present when there was lameness or other foot problem: 3.8% had neck lesions, 3% had broken tails, 23% had dirty hind limbs and 4.6% had dirty udders.
  • Future studies
    Work is being done with infrared thermography and visual examination of dairy cows in different stages of lactation to see the effects of lameness on milk production.

CAUSES: ENVIRONMENT AND GENETICS: 

Once, the lameness problem has been identified, we start looking to discover what has caused it.  It comes down to two choices, environment and genetics.

Environment
Research points to three helpful conclusions:

  1. Cows housed in tie stalls on rubber mats spend more time lying down and have fewer hock injuries than those housed on concrete.
  2. Softer, higher-friction flooring improves the gait of cows with and without sole ulcers.
  3. Wet conditions.  Exposure to moist surfaces results in softer claws and cows with softer claws are at greater risk for lameness.
  4. By far the area with the most environmental impact is tie-stall design. Some dairy cows spend most of their days confined in tie-stalls. Tie stall design can, therefore, affect animal health, welfare, productivity and longevity. Studies are available that can provide the pros and cons of stall length, width, tie-chain length and tie rail height.

Genetics of Locomotion

We have all heard cattle classifiers and show judges point out that locomotion is a key point in identifying exceptional animals. “Moving on a great set of feet and legs” is highly desirable. Cows with a higher feet and legs score, steeper foot angle and somewhat straighter legs have genetically better locomotion. We all think we know what great legs look like, but the inheritance and genetics of proper foot structure is an area that requires scientific research.

TREATMENT AND MEDICATION

Treatment

At the simplest level, although not always achievable, lame cows benefit from spending even short periods of time on pasture.  Relative to the cows housed indoors, cows on pasture improved by a full gait score (i.e. from 3 to 2) over the 5 week treatment period. Two specific elements of gait, tracking up and reluctance to bear weight evenly on all 4 hooves, also improved. There was no change in two other specific gait elements (head bob, back arch). Cows on pasture also spent less time lying down than did cows kept indoors. The study concluded that lame cows benefit from spending even less than 3 weeks on pasture.

Medication     

Cows were scored after administered pain relief medication (ketoprofen) to cows exhibiting gait impairment. Saline was administered to lame control cows. Cows were scored before, during and after treatment. Numerical Rating Scores improved in response to ketoprofen dose, with the greatest improvement occurring at the highest dose (3 mg per kg of body weight). However, even NRS improved by only 0.25 suggesting that more potent drugs are required to treat this pain or that much variation in cow gait is due to factors other than pain.

THE BULLVINE BOTTOM LINE

You can`t fix what you don`t see. Use your eyes. It is crucial that you use every observable technique at your disposal to identify animals that are having foot problems and, it is even more crucial that you do it sooner rather than later.  Keep records. This is one area that sets apart the winners from those who also-ran, or more correctly, those who also-limp.

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BIOSECURITY – How Safe is Your Dairy?

Monday, July 23rd, 2012

As I got out of my vehicle and walked into the cow barn at my friend’s dairy farm last week, I asked myself, “Does he know where my shoes and clothes have been since I left home this morning?”  It’s all too easy for me to hop in the truck at my farm and, in the same clothes and shoes that I’ve been working in, pop over to his place.  Does he care where I’ve been walking? It also seems that the TMR mixer repairman or the milking equipment dealer can also walk anywhere in his barn without him showing concern. I do know that his AI Tech and Vet both take care to wash their footwear on both entry and exit from his farm. However, both those individuals know the cost of disease and carrying contamination between farms.

The Balance Between, “Hi! We’re Open for Business!” and “PRIVATE! Keep Out!”

Two months ago I visited a broiler farm being run by the children of my college classmate. There was a sign at the entry gate to the farm informing all visitors that they were to check at the farm office at the back of the house before proceeding further along the farm lane. At the office, I was served coffee and a sweet but at no time was there any consideration of allowing me anywhere near the exterior door to the poultry barn. Repairmen coming on that farm are given orders to put on completely clean shoes and clothes. I know for sure that the feed delivery truck must have its wheels hosed off before entering and after exiting that farm. These consistent rules are friendly but secure at the same time.

FACT: Dairy producers remain behind their counterparts in the pork and poultry industries on this front called biosecurity.

So why the difference?

The differences probably arise from tradition. Dairy cattle breeders like to see cows in the flesh and welcome opportunities to view the four-legged results of their labours. Poultry producers talk in terms of net return per kg of quota and are focused on producing a healthy product. They are well aware of the devastation that even a minor outbreak of disease can do to ruin the profit potential. Beyond the health of their flock, they also have the desire to guarantee the consumer the safe and biosecure product they demand. If you are thinking that we in the dairy industry do not need to worry about that, then think again. In time, and likely not a long time, it will be a global standard.

Taking absence of disease for granted

In temperate climates, where there is freezing during the winter, endemic zooenotic diseases are far less common than in tropical climates. This quickly became evident to me when I was consulting in the Middle East and witnessed firsthand that our dairy cattle had to be kept in eight foot high walled cow lots so that the native animals did not share their multitude of diseases. The end result from these precautions is that the producers in those countries profit from selling a safe, high quality product.

 What you don’t know CAN hurt you

In truth dairy farmers often are not aware of the incidence or level of a disease on their farms. As well they frequently do not know the cost associated with diseases. A good example is fact that many producers do not see the need to register in state or provincial Johnes eradication programs.  It is reassuring to see the leadership state, provincial, university and industry officials are providing in developing programs to eliminate positive animals. However, are we being too complacent in buying in? At the end of the day do we want to ask ourselves, “Is it comfortable to produce a product that we know we cannot guarantee as being safe and secure from disease contamination? “ Of course, the answer is, “No!”

What’s Ahead

Just last year I had a discussion with Canada’s Chief Veterinary Officer about what happens on the farms of Canada’s trading partners when it comes to biosecurity and what those countries are likely to require to happen in Canada, if they are to sign  trade agreements with us in the future. He spoke in terms of setting in place systems to monitor on-farm biosecurity which would be joint government and industry initiatives. Additionally he spoke about the need to fast track systems of recording, monitoring and guaranteeing healthy food products in Canada.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

Producing nature’s most perfect food does not only involve the production but also the obligation that the product is guaranteed free of any contamination. We all need to get behind the efforts needed at the farm and industry level to guarantee biosecurity. It is part of the future success of dairy farming.

Weekly Show and Sale Recap– 7/21/2012

Saturday, July 21st, 2012

Shows

  • Wisconsin Championship Show
    July 16-17, 2012
    Marshfield, WI
    Judge: Brian Carscadden, Guelph, ON
    Total head: 194

    • Junior Champion: Stranshome Gold Saffron (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st summer yearling, Jordan & Whitney Ebert, Algoma, WI
    • Reserve Junior Champion: Siemers Dstry Sunraygal-ET (Scientific Destry-ET), 1st fall calf, C, J, J, J, C & L Siemers, Newton, WI
    • Intermediate Champion: Siemers Goldwyn Goldie-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st senior 3-year-old, Jordan & Whitney Ebert, Algoma, WI
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion: Benrise Goldwyn Jojo (Braedale Goldwyn), 2nd senior 3-year-old, Peter & Lyn Vail & Budjon Farms, Lomira, WI
    • Senior & Grand Champion: Milksource Goldwyn Africa (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st 4-year-old, Peter & Lyn Vail & Budjon Farm, Lomira, WI
    • Reserve Senior & Reserve Grand Champion: Scientific Gold Dana Rae-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st 5-year-old, Budjon, Kietzman & Woodmansee, Lomira, WI
    • Premier Breeder: Siemers Holsteins, Newton, WI
    • Premier Exhibitor: Peter & Lyn Vail and Budjon Farms, Lomira, WI
  • Western PA Holstein Championship Show
    July 14 – New Castle, PA
    Judge – Dennis Patrick, Woodbine, MD
    Total shown – 165

    • Junior Champion: Lawrence-Haven Laramee Dora (Pine-Shelter Laramee Mar-ET), 1st spring yearling, Wyatt Lawrence, Mercer, PA
    • Res. Junior Champion: Plum-Line Advent Gem (KHW Kite Advent-Red), 1st winter calf, Patrick Carey, Titusville, PA
    • Intermediate Champion: Highland-H Champ Cabaret-ET (Calbrett-I HH Champion), 1st Sr. 3-year-old, Michael & Vanessa Uber, Mercer, PA
    • Res. Intermediate Champion: C-Cove Denison Lani-ET (Jerland Denison-ET), 1st Jr. 3-year-old, Matthew & Angela Lawrence, Mercer, PA
    • Senior & Grand Champion: Le-Ara Sovereign Ruby-Tw (Stanhope Sovereign-ET), 1st 4-year-old, Timothy Sturgeon, Fombell, PA
    • Res. Senior & Res. Grand Champion: Plum-Line Gibson Krackle (Silky Gibson-ET), 1st aged cow, Patrick Carey, Titusville, PA
    • Premier Breeder: Rolling-Spring Holsteins, the Charles Bean family, Franklin, PA
    • Premier Exhibitor: Plum-Line Holsteins, the Carey family, Titusville, PA
    • Junior Division champions
      • Junior Champion: Plum-Line Advent Gem (KHW Kite Advent-Red), winter calf, Patrick Carey, Titusville, PA
      • Res. Junior Champion: Red-Springs Atwood Jordyn (Maple-Downs-I GW Atwood-ET), summer yearling, Justin Kennedy, New Castle, PA
      • Intermediate Champion: Plum-Line Aspen Karamel (EK-Oseeana Aspen-ET), Jr. 2-year-old, Patrick Carey, Titusville, PA
      • Res. Intermediate Champion: Fran-Kee Josh Mickey (Amoore Exclusive Josh), Sr. 3-year-old, Shane Cook, Fombell, PA
      • Senior & Grand Champion: Plum-Line Gibson Krackle (Silky Gibson-ET), aged cow, Patrick Carey, Titusville, PA
      • Res. Senior & Res. Grand Champion: Rolling-Spring D Eccentric-ET (Regancrest Dolman), Morgan Gooch, East Earl, PA
  • Lancaster County (PA) Holstein Show
    July 19 – Lampeter, PA
    Judge –  Steve Shaw, Williamsburg, PA
    Total shown – 75

    • Junior Champion: Cedar-Crest Alexan Lollipop (Golden-Oaks Alexander), 1st spring yearling, Mark & Kris Welk & David K. Stoltzfus, Quarryville, PA
    • Res. Junior Champion: Betty Pottsdale Goldroy Asa (UFM-Dubs Goldroy-ET), 1st winter yearling, Kelsey Heiney, Strasburg, PA
    • Senior & Grand Champion: New-VisionTenley-Red-ET (KHW Kite Advent-Red) 1st Sr. 3-year-old,  Peila Bros LLC, Lancaster, PA
    • Res. Senior & Res. Grand Champion: Gajan Carla (Gajan Counselor JP) 1st 4-year-old, Galen Martin, East Earl, PA
    • Premier Breeder & Exhibitor: Star-Rock Farm, the Barley Family, Conestoga, PA
  •                 Junior Division champions
      • Junior Champion: Betty Pottsdale Goldroy Asa (UFM-Dubs Goldroy-ET), 1st winter yearling (1st open) Kelsey Heiney, Strasburg, PA
      • Res. Junior Champion: Pottsdale Dusk Bernadine, (Scientific SS Dusk), 1st fall yearling (1st open), Jordan Zimmerman,  East Earl, PA
      • Senior & Grand Champion: Arethusa Goldwyn Varina (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st Jr. 3-year-old (1st open), Jordan Zimmerman, East Earl, PA
      • Res. Senior & Res. Grand Champion: Star-Rock Pro 4334 (Windy-Knoll-View Rubens Pro), 1st 4-year-old (2nd open), Jonah Barley, Conestoga, PA
      • Best Bred and Owned Youth: Star-Rock Lightning 5695 (Lylehaven Lightning), 1st Sr. 2-year-old (1st open), Emma Barley, Conestoga, PA
  • Illinois State Holstein Show
    July 20, 2012
    Judge: Chris Hill, MD
    Lincoln, IL

    • Spring Calf (7)
      • 1. Roll-N-View Fever Brand-ET (Crackholm Fever-ET), Caitlin & Blake Meyer and Megan Rohe, IL
      • 2. MS Im An Angel-ET (Mr. Chassity Gold Chip-ET), Connor Erbsen, IL
      • 3. B-J-Grove Confirm Sex Tim (Ralma Confirm-ET), Lucas Clanton, IL
    • Winter Calf (11)
      • 1. MS Gold Chip Bright-ET (Mr Chassity Gold Chip-ET), Jeff Butler & Amanda Kennedy, IL
      • 2. Elder-V Avatar Athena-Red (Mr Apples Avatar-ET), Erbsen, Opperman & Lenkaitis, IL
      • 3. Lylehaven Atwood Dreamer (Maple-Downs-I GW Atwood-ET), Brett Woker, IL
    • Fall Calf (17)
      • 1. MS Atwood Adrenaline (Maple-Downs I GW Atwood-ET), Jeff Butler, IL
      • 2. Lake-Prairie Alison-Red-ET (KHW Kite Advent-Red), Marvin & Joe Schluter, IL
      • 3. R-Vision Lauth Duplicate-ET (Comestar Lauthority-ET), Emily Irwin, IL
    • Summer Yearling (5)
      • 1. Milksource Fever Golden (Crackholm Fever-ET), Jeff Butler, IL
      • 2. Erbacres Chicago Lottery (Erbacres Goldwyn Chicago), Kevin Erbsen, IL
      • 3. Erbacres Dempsey Ericka (Lirr Drew Dempsey), Erbsen, Opperman & Wakely, IL
    • Spring Yearling (5)
      • 1. Headwater Lheros Juliet (Comestar Lheros), Caitlin & Blake Meyer & Miles Price, IL
      • 2. BVK Atwood Alex-ET (Maple Downs-I GW Atwood), Miles Price, IL
      • 3. Erbacres Atwood Sunkist (Maple Downs-I GW Atwood), Payton Erbsen, IL
    • Winter Yearling (6)
      • 1. Erbacres Hope of Peace-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Connor Erbsen, IL
      • 2. Bri-Mel Erstead Layal-ET (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), Caitlin & Blake Meyer & Miles Price, IL
      • 3. Erbacres Love of Peace-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Erbsen, Opperman & Wakely, IL
    • Fall Yearling (9)
      • 1. Pellerat Jasper Ginger-ET (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), Jeff Butler, IL
      • 2. MS Ecstasys Encore-ET (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), Ludwig Farms, IL
      • 3. Luck-E Braxton Maeve (Regancrest S Braxton-ET), Dalton Engel, IL
    • Junior Champion Bred & Owned
      • Erbacres Hope of Peace-ET, 1st winter yearling, Connor Erbsen
    • Reserve Junior Champion Bred & Owned
      • Erbacres Chicago Lottery, 1st B&O summer yearling
    • Junior Champion:
      • Pellerat Jasper Ginger-ET (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), 1st fall yearling, Jeff Butler, IL
    • Reserve Junior Champion
      • Milksource Fever Golden (Crackholm Fever-ET), 1st summer yearling, Jeff Butler, IL
    • HM Junior Champion
      • MS Gold Chip Bright-ET (Mr Chassity Gold Chip-ET), 1st winter calf, Jeff Butler & Amanda Kennedy, IL
    • Junior Best Three (1)
      • 1. Erbacres Holsteins, IL
    • Show Dedication – Lewis Porter, IL
    • 2-year-old futurity (13)
      • 1. Erbacres Goldwyn Cotton (Braedale Goldwyn), Kevin Erbsen, IL
      • 2. Erbacres Ad Lacross-Red (KHW Kite Advent-Red), Carla Erbsen Mickey, IL
      • 3. Erbacres Advent Muffin (KHW Kite Advent-Red), Nathan Erbsen, IL
    • Junior 2-year-old (12)
      • 1. BVK Atwood Arianna-ET (Maple-Downs I GW Atwood-ET), Jeff Butler & MB Lucklady Farm, IL & CA
      • 2. Swanee-Acres Sho Ectasy (Patience Showline Contender-Red), Jason Swanson, IL
      • 3. Erbacres Ad Lacross-Red (KHW Kite Advent-Red-ET), Carla Erbsen Mickey, IL
    • Senior 2-year-old (9)
      • 1. Boisblanc Jasper Cristala (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), Jeff Butler, IL
      • 2. Erbacres Goldwyn Cotton (Braedale Goldwyn), Kevin Erbsen, IL
      • 3. Korian Goldwyn Sun-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Katelyn Dugan, IL
    • Junior 3-year-old (7)
      • 1. Ludwigs-DG Goldwyn Ellie-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Ludwig Farms, IL
      • 2. Ludwigs-DG Goldwyn Emmy-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Ludwig Farms, IL
      • 3. Lindale Affirmed Kinsey (BKB Affirmed-ET), Dale and Linda Drendel, IL
    • Senior 3-year-old (14)
      • 1. Golden-Oaks Plaid 4830 (Windy-Knoll-View Plaid), Golden Oaks Farm, IL
      • 2. Golden-Oaks Dundee 4891 (Regancrest Dundee), Golden Oaks Farm, IL
      • 3. Pierstein Goldwyn Maya (Braedale Goldwyn), Ben Sauder, IL
    • Intermediate Champion
      • BVK Atwood Arianna-ET (Maple-Downs I GW Atwood-ET), 1st Jr. 2-year-old, Jeff Butler & MB Lucklady Farm, IL & CA
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion
      • Ludwigs-DG Goldwyn Ellie-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st Jr. 3-year-old, Ludwig Farms, IL
    • HM Intermediate Champion
      • Ludwigs-DG Goldwyn Emmy-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), 2nd Jr. 3-year-old, Ludwig Farms, IL
    • 4-year-old (3)
      • 1. Lindale Advent Dulcie (KHW Kite Advent-Red), Dale & Linda Drendel, IL
      • 2. Team Aspen Michele-ET (EK-Oseeana Aspen-ET), Dale & Linda Drendel, IL
      • 3. Bluff-Ridge Roy Baretta (Roylane Jordan), Sarah Butler, IL
    • 5-year-old Futurity (4)
      • 1. Team Durham Morgan (Regancrest Elton Durham), Team Holsteins, IL
      • 2. Lindale Aspen Maybelle (EK-Oseeana Aspen-ET), Dale & Linda Drendel, IL
      • 3. Bluff-Ridge Roy Jessie-ET (Roylane Jordan), Sarah Butler, IL
    • 5-year-old (6)
      • 1. MS Dundee Belinda (Regancrest Dundee), Jeff Butler, IL
      • 2. Team Durham Morgan (Regancrest Elton Durham), Team Holsteins, IL
      • 3. Kagwick Durham Suzy (Regancrest Elton Durham), Dale & Linda Drendel, IL
    • Aged Cow (3)
      • 1. Gundys Alise (Silky Gibson), Robert Gunderson, IL
      • 2. Hicklee Goldwyn Good-TW-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Team Holsteins & Jason Swanson, IL
      • 3. Kalmeys Roy Piehe (Roylane Jordan), Erdman Dairy, IL
    • 125,000 lb. cow (3)
      • 1. Exels Goldwyn Anna-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Legendholm & Norm Nabholz, IL & IA
      • 2. Gardner Durham Medusa (Regancrest Elton Durham), Dale & Linda Drendel, IL
      • 3. B-J Grove Champion Hoover (Calbrett-I HH Champion), Casey Clanton & Miranda Kollmann, IL
    • Senior & Grand Champion
      • MS Dundee Belinda (Regancrest Dundee), 1st 5-year-old, Jeff Butler, IL
      • Reserve Senior & Reserve Grand Champion
      • Exels Goldwyn Anna-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st 125,000 lb. cow, Legendholm & Norm Nabholz, IL & IA
    • Premier Breeder – Erbacres
    • Premier Exhibitor: Lindale Holsteins
  • Illinois State Junior Holstein Show
    July 19, 2012
    Lincoln, IL
    Judge: Molly Sloan, WI

    • Spring Calf (9)
      • 1. Roll-N-View Fever Brand-ET (Crackholm Fever-ET), Caitlin & Blake Meyer and Megan Rohe, IL
      • 2. MS Im An Angel (Mr Chassity Gold Chip-ET), Connor Erbsen, IL
      • 3. Clearfield Jeeves Amoura-ET (Ked Outside Jeeves-ET), Lila Sloan, IL
    • Winter Calf (10)
      • 1. Edler-V Avatar Athena-Red (Mr Apples Avatar-ET), Erbsen, Opperman & Lenkatis, IL
      • 2. SRD-IL Atlas Bonita (MD-Delight Durham Atlas-ET), Carson Kasbergen, IL
      • 3. Luck-E Guthrie Kaboo (Fustead Goldwyn Guthrie-ET), Katelyn Engel, IL
    • Fall Calf (15)
      • 1. SRD-IL Windbrook Bryn-ET (Gillette Windbrook), Carson Kasbergen, IL
      • 2. R-Vision Lauth Duplicate-ET (Comestar Lauthority-ET), Emily Irwin, IL
      • 3. R-Vision Lauthority Flash (Comestar Lauthority-ET), Bailey Hart, IL
    • Summer Yearling (3)
      • 1. Erbacres Dempsey Erica (Lirr Drew Dempsey), Erbsen, Opperman & Wakeley, IL
      • 2. Char-La-Don Sanchez Lace-ET (Gen-Mark Stmatic Sanchez), Jessica Telgmann, IL
      • 3. Golden-Oaks Clark Peachy (Dool-Leigh Goldwyn Clark), Riley Koehn, IL
    • Spring Yearling (5)
      • 1. Headwater Lheros Juliet (Comestar Lheros), Caitlin & Blake Meyer & Miles Price, IL
      • 2. Erbacres Atwood Sunkist (Maple Downs-I GW Atwood), Payton Erbsen, IL
      • 3. BVK Atwood Alex-ET (Maple Downs-I GW Atwood), Miles Price, IL
    • Winter Yearling (7)
      • 1. Erbacres Love of Peace-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Erbsen, Opperman & Wakeley, IL
      • 2. Erbacres Hope of Peace-ET (Braedale Goldwn), Connor Erbsen, IL
      • 3. Bri-Mel Erstead Layla-ET (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), Caitin & Blake Meyer & Miles Price, IL
    • Fall Yearling (7)
      • 1. Luck-E Braxton Maeve (Regancrest S Braxton-ET), Dalton Engel, IL
      • 2. MS Jasper Spearmint (Wilcoxview Jasper-ET), Caitlin Meyer, IL
      • 3. R-Vision Monument Callie (Palmcrest Monument-ET), Emily Irwin, IL
    • Junior Champion Bred & Owned
      • SRD-IL Windbrook Bryn-ET, 1st place fall calf, Carson Kasbergen, IL
    • Junior Champion
      • Erbacres Love of Peace-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st winter yearling, Erbsen, Opperman & Wakeley, IL
    • Reserve Junior Champion
      • Erbacres Hope of Peace-ET (Braedale Goldwn), 2nd winter yearling Connor Erbsen, IL
    • HM Junior Champion
      • Headwater Lheros Juliet (Comestar Lheros),1st spring yearling, Caitlin & Blake Meyer & Miles Price, IL
    • Junior 2-year-old (5)
      • 1. Lady-Alicia Sanchez Adore-ET (Gen-Mark Stmatic Sanchez), Tyler Carter, IL
      • 2. Bri-Mel-Acres Sanchez Greta (Gen-Mark Stmatic Sanchez), Caitlin Meyer, I
      • 3. Brendayne Aftershock Rosie (MS Atlees Sht Aftershock-ET), Brett Walker, IL
    • Senior 2-year-old (7)
      • 1. Cross-Jen Macdad Jesslynn (Foxberry Lou Macdaddy), Jennifer Wakeley, IL
      • 2. Bluff-Ridge Goldwyn Biddy (Braedale Goldwyn), Sarah Butler, IL
      • 3. Schluter Sanchez Tena-ET (Gen-Mark Stmatic Sanchez), Katelyn Dugan, IL
    • Junior 3-year-old (1)
      • 1. Luck-E Goldwyn Amber-ET (Braedale Goldwyn), Jessica Telgmann, IL
    • Senior 3-year-old (6)
      • 1. Regancrest S Desire (Picston Shottle-ET), Connor Erbsen, IL
      • 2. O-Kop Logan Adrian (Erhart Logan-ET), Olivia Telgmann, IL
      • 3. Bluff-Ridge Dundee Jeannie (Regancrest Dundee), Sarah Butler, IL
    • Intermediate & Reserve Grand Champion
      • Lady-Alicia Sanchez Adore-ET (Gen-Mark Stmatic Sanchez), 1st Jr. 2-year-old, Tyler Carter, IL
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion
      • Regancrest S Desire (Picston Shottle-ET), 1st Sr. 3-year-old, Connor Erbsen, IL
    • Four-year-old (1)
      • 1. Bluff-Ridge Roy Barretta (Roylane Jordan), Sarah Butler, IL
    • 5-year-old (2)
      • 1. Mohrfield Supra Precious (Blondin Supra-ET), Tyler Carter, IL
      • 2. Mil-R-Mor Damion Cheerios (Erbacres Damion), Bri Sheehan, IL
    • Aged Cow (1)
      • 1. Wessmann Best Velocity (Hidden-View Best), Jessica Telgmann, IL
    • 125,000 lb Cow (1)
      • 1. Schluter Roy Leann (Roylane Jordan), Jessica Telgmann, IL
    • Senior & Grand Champion
      • Schluter Roy Leann (Roylane Jordan), 1st 125,000 lb. cow, Jessica Telgmann, IL
    • Reserve Senior Champion
      • Mohrfield Supra Precious (Blondin Supra-ET), 1st 5-year-old Tyler Carter, IL
  • Vancouver Island Holstein Show Results
    July 12, 2012
    Duncan, BC
    Judge: Pierre Boulet, QC
    94 Head

    • Intermediate Calf (13)
      • 1. Westcoast Goulet Victoria (Goulet), Westcoast Holsteins, BC
      • 2. Rypster Winners M701 (Winners), T&L Cattle Ltd., Kingsway & Josh Larson, BC & ON
      • 3. Tolamika Dempsey Georgette (Dempsey), T&L Cattle., BC
    • Senior Calf (15)
      • 1. Saanwood Goldwyn Tiara (Goldwyn), Viewfield Farms, BC
      • 2. Poelman Phoenix Roxalyn (Phoenix), Sunny Vale Farm Ltd., BC
      • 3. Springbend Sanchez Rose (Sanchez), Springbend Farms, BC
    • Summer Yearling (14)
      • 1. Nipponia Atlas Memorable (Atlas), T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
      • 2. Miss Kansas (Gold Chris), Westcoast Holsteins, BC
      • 3. Dubeau Dundee Shiekh Salah (Dundee), Silvermaple Holsteins, BC
    • Junior Yearling (6)
      • 1. R-John Atwood Ashlyn (Atwood), Westcoast Holsteins, BC
      • 2. Hammingview Fever Montie (Fever), Hammingview Farms, BC
      • 3. Hammingview Fever Abbie (Fever), Silvermaple Holsteins, BC
    • Intermediate Yearling (2)
      • 1. Willswikk Duplex Connie (Duplex), Meadow Green Farms, BC
      • 2. Ashview-TG Lovely Cut (Final Cut), T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
    • Senior Yearling (2)
      • 1. Brabantdale Alexander Splendid (Alexander), John Sunder, Premier West & Rose Gate Dairy, BC
      • 2. BVK MB-Lucky Atwood 5629-ET (Atwood), T&L Cattle Ltd. & Kingsway, BC & ON
    • Junior Champion – Saanwood Goldwyn Tiara (Goldwyn), Viewfield Farms, BC
    • Reserve Junior Champion – Nipponia Atlas Memorable (Atlas), T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
    • Honorable Mention Junior Champion – Brabantdale Alexander Splendid (Alexander), John Sunder, Premier West & Rose Gate Dairy, BC
    • Junior Group of Three (2)
      • 1. Viewfield Farms, BC
      • 2. Sunny Vale Farm Ltd., BC
    • Junior 2 Year Old (8)
      • 1. Morsan Sanchez Priscilla (Sanchez), Westcoast Holsteins, BC
      • 2. Robin-Hood LKI Carrissa (Atwood), T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
      • 3. RockyMountain Tarmac Daphne (Tarmac), T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
    • Senior 2 Year Old (9)
      • 1. Cedarwal Sanchez Icing (Sanchez), Cedarwal Farms, BC
      • 2. Bradner Curry Goldwyn (Goldwyn), T&L Cattle Ltd., Kingsway & Cherry Crest, BC & ON
      • 3. Butz-Butler Sanchez Banjo (Sanchez), Stanhope-Wedgwood, BC
    • Junior 3 Year Old (6)
      • 1. Willswikk Shottle Deidre (Shottle), Willswikk Holsteins, BC
      • 2. Butz-Butler Gold Brandy-ET (Goldwyn), Stanhope-Wedgwood, BC
      • 3. Wedgwood Lavina Goldwyn (Goldwyn), Stanhope-Wedgwood, BC
    • Senior 3 Year Old (5)
      • 1. Falonasprings Ralst Holly Red (Ralstrom), Stanhope-Wedgwood & Beemer Holsteins, BC & AB
      • 2. Wedgwood Prism Goldwyn (Goldwyn), Stanhope-Wedgwood, BC
      • 3. Goldenset Jasper Haylee (Jasper), Westcoast Holsteins, BC
    • 4 Year Old (4)
      • 1. Dardel Dundee Tiara O (Dundee), T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
      • 2. Claquato-RH Excite-ET (Dundee), Stanhope-Wedgwood, Claquato & Robin Hood, BC & WA
      • 3. Silvermpale Damion Gordana (Damion), Silvermaple Holsteins, BC
    • 5 Year Old (4)
      • 1. Robin-Hoold Clumbo-ET (Durham), T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
      • 2. Vandyk-S Pontiac Kaadrian (Pontiac), T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
      • 3. Poelman Roy Savannah (Roy), Willswikk Holsteins, BC
    • Mature Cow (6)
      • 1. Jon-Lu Talent Regina (Talent), Westcoast Holsteins, BC
      • 2. Oakparke Linjet Jamie (Linjet), T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
      • 3. Springbend Talent Piston (Talent), Springbend Holsteins & Jim & Kirsty McAvoy, BC
    • Grand Champion – Jon-Lu Talent Regina (Talent), Westcoast Holsteins, BC
    • Reserve Grand Champion – Cedarwal Sanchez Icing (Sanchez), Cedarwal Farms, BC
    • Honorable Mention Grand Champion – Morsan Sanchez Priscilla (Sanchez), Westcoast Holsteins, BC
    • Best Island Bred Cow – Willswikk Shottle Deidre (Shottle), Willswikk Holsteins, BC
    • Total Performance Cow – Oakparke Linjet Jamie (Linjet), T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
    • Best Udder – Jon-Lu Talent Regina (Talent), Westcoast Holsteins, BC
    • Breeder’s Herd (1)
      • 1. Stanhope-Wedgwood, BC
    • Premier Breeder – Stanhope-Wedgwood, BC
    • Premier Exhibitor – T&L Cattle Ltd., BC
  • All-Oregon Holstein Show
    Tillamook, OR
    Judge: Adam Van Exel, Lodi, CA
    80 Head Shown

    • Spring Calves (5)
      • 1. (JR) Moretti Damion Lizzie (Damion), Missy Moretti
      • 2. Mistvale Bolton Buddy (Bolton), Nolan Fletcher
      • 3. Hale-Valley Above Rihanna, Jason Hale
    • Winter Calves (9)
      • 1. TMK Atwood Bitchn (Atwood), TMK Farm
      • 2. (JR) Mistvale Melky Shani, Rylee Armstrong
      • 3. Midway GW Atwood Satin (Atwood), Midway Dairy
    • Fall Calves (9)
      • 1. Crazy-For Damion Tickle (Damion), Kenny Coppini
      • 2. (JR) TMK Sanchez Honkey-TW (Sanchez), Katie Sherer
      • 3. (JR) Chameleon Secure Red Apple Pie (Secure), Cody Perry
    • Summer Yearling (2)
      • 1. Crazy-For Contender Stylin (Contender), Kenny Coppini
      • 2. (JR) Hale-Valley Reality Jif-Red (Reality), Hale Valley
    • Spring Yearling (8)
      • 1. Sculpture-Of San Enhance-ET, TMK Farm
      • 2. Midway Braxton F Anna (Braxton), Midway Dairy
      • 3. Crazy-For SCR Dip-ET, Kenny Coppini
    • Winter Yearling (3)
      • 1. (JR) Mistvale Advent Robyn-Red (Advent), Staci Sherer
      • 2. (JR) Lazy-A Sanchez Tori (Sanchez), Mathew Ruby
      • 3. Hale-Valley Jammer Taffy, Hale-Valley
    • Fall Yearling (4)
      • 1. Midway Sanchez Elaine (Sanchez), Midway Dairy
      • 2. Hale-Valley Destry Skatter (Destry), Hale-Valley
      • 3. (JR) Paulo-Bro-Hakker Dacia 8691, Scott Rocha
    • Junior Champion of the Junior Show
      • Mistvale Advent Robyn-Red (Advent), 1st Winter Yearling, Staci Sherer
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Junior Show
      • TMK Sanchez Honkey (Sanchez), 1st Fall Calf, Katie Sherer
    • HM Junior Champion of the Junior Show
      • Mistvale Melky Shani, 1st Winter Calf, Rylee Armstrong
    • Junior Champion of the Open Show
      •  Crazy-For Damion Tickle (Damion), 1st Fall Calf, Kenny Coppini
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Open Show
      • Sculpture-Of San Enhance, 1st Spring Yearling, TMK Farm
    • HM Junior Champion of the Open Show
      • Crazy-For Contender Stylin (Contender), 1st Summer Yearling, Kenny Coppini
    • Junior Best Three Females (6)
      • 1. Kenny Coppini
      • 2. Mistvale Farm
      • 3. Midway Dairy
    • Junior 2 Year Old (5)
      • 1. (BU) Danielle-L Sanchez Alise-ET (Sanchez), Gracie Krahn
      • 2. Crazy-For AD Dapple-Red (Advent), Kenny Coppini
      • 3. Midway Aftershock Anna (Aftershock), Midway Dairy
    • Senior 2 Year Old (9)
      • 1. (BU) Juniper-Haven A Raja-Red-ET – Juniper-Haven
      • 2. Juniper-Haven Sanchez Dolly – Juniper-Haven
      • 3. Permium-Farms Brax Aladin – Cristopher Rocha
    • Junior 3 Year Old (5)
      • 1. (JR & BU) Western-Lite Sanchez Dally (Sanchez), Missy Moretti
      • 2. Hale-Valley Alex Clementine (Alexander), Hale-Valley
      • 3. Chameleon Shaquille Nikki (Shaquille), Cristopher Rocha
    • Senior 3 Year Old (6)
      • 1. Crazy-For Sept Delirious-TW (September Storm), Kenny Coppini
      • 2. (BU) Crazy-For Sept Delicious-TW (September Storm), Kenny Coppini
      • 3. Oceanview SM Dund Zandra-ET (Dundee), John Lewis
    • Intermediate Champion
      • Juniper-Haven A Raja-Red-ET, 1st Senior 2 Year Old, Juniper-Haven
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion
      • Danielle-L Sanchez Alise-ET (Sanchez), 1st Junior 2 Year Old, Gracie Krahn
    • HM Intermediate Champion
      • Crazy-For Sept Delirious-TW (September Storm), 1st Senior 3 Year Old, Kenny Coppini
    • 4 Year Old (6)
      • 1. (BU) Crazy-For Advent Dazzle-ET (Advent), Kenny Coppini
      • 2. Midway Gage Secret, Midway Dairy
      • 3. Midway Affirmed Farah (Affirmed), Midway Dairy
    • 5 Year Old (3)
      • 1. Crazy-For Durham Lil Lea-ET (Durham), Kenny Coppini
      • 2. (BU) Hale-Valley Lou Alley (Lou), Hale-Valley
      • 3. Midway Talent Nina (Talent), Midway Dairy
    • Six Years & Older Cow (6)
      • 1. (BU) Midway Dundee Dazzle (Dundee), Midway Dairy
      • 2. Bob-Cat 829 HiMetro Sara (HiMetro), Kenny Coppini
      • 3. Mistvale Roy Freda (Roy), Mistvale Farm
    • Senior & Grand Champion of the Junior Show
      • Western-Lite Sanchez Dally (Sanchez), Missy Moretti
    • Reserve Senior & Grand Champion of the Junior Show
      • Premium-Farms Amaz Noel-Red, Missy Moretti
    • HM Senior & Grand Champion of the Junior Show
      • Hale-Valley Rubens Jigalow (Rubens), Jason Hale
    • Senior Champion of the Open Show
      • Crazy-For Advent Dazzle (Advent), 1st 4 Year Old, Kenny Coppini
    • Reserve Senior Champion of the Open Show
      • Cazy-For Durham Lil Lea-ET (Durham), 1st 5 Year Old, Kenny Coppini
    • HM Senior Champion of the Open Show
      • Midway Dundee Dazzle (Dundee), 1st Aged Cow, Midway Dairy
    • Grand Champion of the Open Show
      • Crazy-For Advent Dazzle (Advent), 1st 4 Year Old, Kenny Coppini
    • Reserve Grand Champion of the Open Show
      • Juniper-Haven A Raja-Red, 1st Senior 2 Year Old, Juniper-Haven
    • HM Grand Champion of the Open Show
      • Cazy-For Durham Lil Lea-ET (Durham), 1st 5 Year Old, Kenny Coppini
    • Oregon Distinguished Service Award – Jerry Strandlund – Bovagraph & Northwest Holstein News
    • Senior Best Three Females (4)
      • 1. Kenny Coppini
      • 2. Midway Dairy
      • 3. Juniper-Haven
    • Exhibitor’s Herd (3)
      • 1. Kenny Coppini
      • 2. Midway Dairy
      • 3. Hale-Valley
    • Dam & Daughter (1)
      • 1. Kenny Coppini
    • Produce of Dam (7)
      • 1. Kenny Coppini
      • 2. Kenny Coppini
      • 3. Midway Dairy
  • Expo Lachute Champions
    July 15, 2012
    Judge: Jocelyn Côté, QC
    76 Head

    • Junior Champion – Rietben B Sassy (Braxton), 1st Int. Calf, Ferme Drouin & fils, QC
    • Reserve Junior Champion – Bonnie Brae Jasper Coreena (Jasper), 1st Sr. Calf, Bruce & Susan Mode, ON
    • HM Junior Champion – Pierstein Oasis Reba (Oasis), 1st Jr. Yearling, Andrew Mcouat, QC
    • Grand Champion – Klagvale Goldwyn Jackie (Goldwyn), 1st 5 Yr. Old, Ferme Lolisee et Jean Desrosiers, QC
    • Reserve Grand Champion – Bobasyl Dundee Rosa Glow (Dundee), 1st Mature Cow, Ferme Filiking et Ferme Blondin, QC
    • HM Grand Champion – Elm Bend Mudslide (Titanic), 2nd Mature Cow, Mario Lauzon, QC

Sales

  • Ath-Mor Holsteins Complete Dispersal Results
    Ath-Mor Holsteins Complete Dispersal on Tuesday, July 17 saw 273 full lots average $2,338 for a total gross of $660,850.00.   A large crowd was on hand this blazing hot summer day with the temperature hitting 95 degrees with high humidity.  The partnership of Tom Morrell & Russ Atherton and their families crafted a highly respected herd with incredible production (RHA 3x 29,757M 3.6 1086F 3.0 899P) & many high GTPI individuals.  Over 30 head sold in the sale with AI contracts and many others will garner attention from astute AI units.

    • Topping the sale at $18,000.00 was lot 576.  Sired by Shamrock, she carried a GTPI +2348 +96F +74P +$771NM +5.0PL.  Her dam is a VG-85 Jammer with 39,030M 1516F 1313P who also sold in the sale carrying AI contracts.  The high seller went to Sexing Technologies & the dam heads to Pine Tree in Ohio.
    • High selling embryos for the day were sired by Numero Uno from a GP-82 Planet w/GTPI +2141 and contract interest in the resulting calves.  The embryos sold to Dr. Richard Whitaker and Carlton Bull.
  • Maryland State Sale
    July 17, 2012
    McHenry, Maryland
    78 Full lots averaged $4,832

    • High Seller: Lot 2 – $29,000 – Locust Ayr C Mercy P Red-ET – A flush age Red Polled Colt P with a GTPI of +2036 – Buyer: San Dan Holsteins – Consignor: Mike and Anita Haines
    • 2nd High Seller: Lot 4 – $25,000 – Ladys Manor GR Lachelle ET – A March 2012 Grafeeti with a GTPI of +2394 – Consignor: My Ladys Manor Farm – Buyer: Glen-Toctin Farm
  • Guernsey Gathering Sale Averages $2230
    The Guernsey Gathering Sale averaged $2230 on 80 head in Mechanicsburg, Ohio, on July 14. The sale was managed and hosted by Land of Living Farm – John, Bonnie, Lucas, Austin and Eli Ayars. The offering truly provided something for everything with 28 milk cows, a handful of bred heifers and a large selection of show-aged open heifers.

    • The top seller was $9000 for Lot 9, a fancy, fresh Jr. 2 that is a potential 7th generation EX. Her EX-91 dam was the Intermediate Champion at Madison in 2010 and All-American that year. The next dam, an EX-91 Deemand, made over 950F and won the National Guernsey Futurity in 2006. The next four dams are scored EX-94, EX-93, EX-93 and EX-91. She sold to Paul Nicley of Indiana and was consigned by Leroy Kipp of Wisconsin.
    • Rolling Prairie Farm of Garnavillo, Iowa, provided the second high seller, a Fall Calf from a VG-85 dam with 20,000M and 930F. Ready for the colored shavings, she sold to Darlene Moser of Pleasant Lake, Indiana, for $5300.
    • The third high of the sale was a fresh Sr. 3-Year-Old milking very well after having made 19,000M as a 2-Year-Old. Clearview Creek Paige was consigned by sale hosts Land of Living Farm and was the 2nd Sr. 2-Year-Old at the Ohio State Fair last year. She sold for $4700 to Spring Walk Farm of Big Prairie, Ohio.
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Categories : Show and Sale Recap

Is The Bullvine Your Guilty Pleasure?

Friday, July 20th, 2012

Everyone has their guilty pleasures.  Some people like to eat lots of ice cream, some people drink a little too much (yes cattle fitters out there you know who I am talking about), but everyone has their guilty pleasure.  Recently The Bullvine has started to become many dairy breeders’ guilty pleasure.

For years, dairy breeders have had limited options when it came  to reading unique content.  I can still remember when Holstein International came on the scene.  At the time, it was so different from all the other publications that breeders had, that it was very warmly received.  Since launching the Bullvine we have enjoyed  the same reception.  Dairy breeders have been giving us such great feedback it’s really humbling, even for someone with as big an ego as mine.

In introducing the Bullvine, we are seeking to make breeders think.  Yes we do produce content that for some can be edgy, but, with every piece we produce, we are seeking to give our readers something unique to chew on.  For example: Holstein vs. Jersey: Which Breed Is More Profitable?The Top 10 Most Influential Holstein Breeders of All-Time and Show Cows: All Type and No Action? As long as we achieve that with even one breeder than we have achieved our goal.  Does that mean that everyone needs to agree with us?  Hell no.  I would be disappointed if it did.  We are not doing our job if we are not pushing the limits.

Have We Gone Too Far?

Now some might call our willingness to push the limits,  tabloid fare, or even dairy scandal mongering. To them I say, get real.  We have never slandered a single person.  Every article we write is written and backed by hard facts.

However, for those who call us controversial!   Great!   We wanted to be different.  We wanted to stand out from the crowd and be something that dairy breeders would enjoy reading.  Moreover, the stats prove it. Are we “XXX” rated?   How do YOU measure pushy and provocative?

What makes us the fastest growing dairy magazine in history?

Well part of it is the age we live in.  In launching the Bullvine, we did not seek to use the old school printed versions.  Instead we did a full press digital launch.  That means more than just our website.  It included The Bullvine’s Facebook page where we reach over 30,000 readers weekly, and our Twitter account that reaches over 300,000 readers monthly.  All that in fewer than 5 months.  We are happy to say folks, and competitors, there is no question we are the fastest growing dairy magazine in the world.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

Do we use a creative spin to make things interesting?  You bet.  Are we afraid to say something just because it may not be politically correct?  Hell no.   We aim to be an influential information source for dairy breeders. For us, that will mean that no subjects, issues or people are off limits! Thanks for all the amazing support and constructive criticism.  We are excited about the many great issues we plan to cover in the future.  That is our guilty pleasure.

From old school dairy breeders telling you, “They are all worthless!” to geneticists telling you “They are the greatest thing since sliced bread!” it can be challenging to figure out whether tools like TPI® and LPI have significant merits in your breeding or marketing program

What Are They?

To get a better understanding of what each of these indexes represent start with the fact that  TPI® (Total Performance Index) and LPI (Lifetime Profit Index) are multi-trait indexes.  They both combine production, type, and health and fertility traits to rank sires on their ability to transmit an economic balance of these traits. TPI® is calculated by Holstein USA and LPI is calculated by The Canadian Dairy Network.

The big thing to remember about both of these indexes is that they are more or less a predictor of a bull’s ability to transmit based on established weightings.  For TPI® that weighting is as follows

TPI Formula

Source: Holstein USA, click on image for more details

Whereas LPI has the following weighting, 51% production, 29% conformation and 20% health traits. As you will notice, LPI actually puts a greater weighting on conformation and health than does the TPI®.

They’re Tools You Fool

The big thing to remember is both of these indexes were created to help identify superior sires that combined high production, sound conformation, and desirable health and fertility traits.  It does not mean that these sires are the only sires you should be using.  Or that if you only use these sires you will have the best herd in the world.

What it does mean is that you can use these tools to help short list what sires you are wanting to use, assuming that you are breeding for high production, conformation, and fertility.  If you are like some old school breeders who feel that high lactation production is not worth the tradeoff then fine, LPI and TPI® are not for you.  In reality, each breeding program would be best to develop their own index based on the needs and goals of their breeding program.  Maybe you would want more emphasis on health or type.  It all depends on your goals and then you work from there.

It’s All About the Marketing

Were these indexes created just for marketing?  No.  Were they created for ways to compare and sell sires?  Yes.  What’s the difference?  Well when both these indexes were created they had all the right intentions.  They were created for a way to compare sires on their overall genetic merits.  Which lead to major sale and marketing opportunities for those organizations and breeders who had the top sires.

I can remember that, before these multi-trait indexes were introduced,  everyone claimed to have the #1 sire or cow.  While that is still happening, for the most part TPI® and LPI provide the opportunity for breeders to gain a clear understanding of who is the top sire for producing high production, sound conformation, and healthy cattle.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

With so many different traits that are evaluated, trying to identify which sires have the overall best genetics can be very challenging.  While the TPI® and LPI formulas may not be the exact weighting that works for your breeding program, they are designed to represent that average breeder (if there is such a thing).  They are designed to give opportunity to compare sires on relative merits and see which sires rise to the top.  The big thing to remember is that they are to be used as tools! If you lose focus on that, these tools can have you looking like a fool!

Movie fans will remember the movie “BIG” where a young boy makes a wish at a fairground machine to be big. He wakes up the following morning to find that his wish has been granted and his body has grown older over night. But he is still the same 12 year old kid on the inside with a whole lot of strange new people and experiences to deal with! Some, including Canada, are finding themselves in a grown up world trying to catch up.

The Cream Rises to the Top of the Milk Maker List?

Globally, dairy farming, along with agriculture in general, is experiencing the “BIG” phenomenon. Milk production is expected to grow an average 2% per year for the next decade. Asia will account for most of it. Now that`s a lot of milk and BIG indeed!

Today we are looking at the list of Top 10 Countries By Milk Production as per US Department of Agriculture, 2011:

Top 10 Countries By Milk Production

Everyone feels patriotic when their country does well on ranked lists. Did you look to see where your country stood in the Top 10? How did it make you feel? Where you even on the list? If you’re like me, you probably thought (because of numerous publication writers telling you so) that Canada is a major milk producer. Ooops! We better make that major milk consumer. We are higher on the milk consumer list than we are on the milk producer list. We’re approximately 12th for per capita consumption, according to the United States Department of Agriculture and we’re 19th for production. Sounds a little far back even for a die-hard Blue Jays and Maple Leafs fan.

Where’s the Wiggle Room?

There’s lots of room for everybody to take advantage of the opportunities. If you’re at the top of the list, like the U.S. you can take heart from the fact that food production will be challenged to increase 70 percent over the next 30 years. The scary part is the fluctuating nature of consumer demand. An editorial in Hoard’s Dairyman, 8/25/10 made these points, “Of the countless wildcards in the dairy business, the future role of dairy exports is, perhaps, the wildest. That is why it is vital that our industry leaders and policymakers keep export potential in perspective. What our industry must have is a system that enables us all to expand production when domestic and foreign demand calls for it and to cut back on production when the market signals tell us to.” The comments are definitely something to think about. On the other hand, there are dangers in holding back as well. The truth is there is a huge gap between growing global demand and global supply. You might rewrite the axiom to say, “Nature abhors a gap!”You can be 100% sure of one thing. Somebody will move to fill it. The earliest ones into the game with vision and dollars will be able to profit from providing the milk, even it has to be accessed outside their own borders. It has been suggested that New Zealand could accomplish this. Or perhaps one of the mega-food companies who see the opportunity and are ready to take it. There is huge potential for countries or companies who have a low cost of production to move to the forefront of milk production.

But what if you`re further down the production side of the list? You may decide that it’s time to start movin’ on up! Hang on! It could be a bumpy ride. Consumer demands, trade regulations and national food policies are just three of the variables that are going to present ongoing challenges. even though many forecasters see agriculture as the greatest growth industry of our time. Super! All we have to do is increase the production of animals and plants. But then there is the increasing squeeze from land use, sustainable agriculture and available water. It’s ironic that at the very time when markets are growing and science and technology are making great strides, land and water use from growing urbanization are providing counter pressure.

Although we are learning to accept and adapt to the speed of new technology, it is probably true, that what we are familiar with today may not be the breakthrough that will take us into the future. For example, new technologies, such as nutrigenomics, will become increasingly important. With nutrigenomics, it will be possible to influence or control genetic expression in animals. Certain feed ingredients will be able to switch on genes in the animals, leading to improved production. It will revolutionize nutrition, said Karl Dawson, chief scientific officer at Alltech, when speaking at the Alltech International Symposium held in May in Lexington, Kentucky. He added. “You’re going to see more changes in nutrition in the next 10 years than you have seen in the last century.”

Thus far we see that there is growing demand and improved methods of delivering milk and milk products. Another key factor is the initiatives throughout the world to train farmers in the business of dairy farming. Rural development and sustainable agriculture projects are seeing successes that will affect milk production worldwide, while sourcing information and mentors in the areas of animal genetics, product development and dairy cattle management.

THE BULLVINE BOTTOM LINE:

So far, everyone agrees that it will be possible, somehow, to keep up with the food demands of a growing world population. What we may not be so sure of is the exactly how it will happen. Nevertheless, milk will be an important product in feeding world populations. If you`re already in the dairy industry, you have an advantage that not all of the companies who aspire to global trade can claim and that is that the market is far from saturated and demand is continually growing. No wonder the stock market is recognizing that you can put your money where the milk is.

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Adding genomics to genetic evaluations brings more attention to young heifers. There is increased accuracy to heifer indexes and new population benchmarks.  Even more significant are the Direct Genetic Values (DGVs) that are generated from the DNA results.  As you will see, the the very top heifers increase their genetic indexes significantly, while their full sisters, without high DGVs are not on the list. The DGV value makes the difference.

The Bullvine continually receives the question, “Why are the top heifers at the top?” In order to assist the industry to better know how high is great, the Bullvine has done an analysis of the top 25 Canadian Holstein heifers published in April 2012 by Canadian Dairy Network.

What do the average for the Top 25 look like?

[csv2table source=”http://www.thebullvine.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/genomic-heifers.csv” icons=”false”]

This is a truly exceptional group. What other Top 25 female list would be able to boast of an average value of 192 kg. for fat plus protein and 13 for conformation on their Parent Average Genetic Indexes? And look at their DGVs. They are even higher at 203 kgs. for fat plus protein and 13.8 for conformation.

Digging Deeper

Average numbers are a good place to start, but there are additional facts that can assist us in understanding the Top 25.

  • 21 were less than 1 year of age and 4 were over 12 months of age. Obviously, the heifers on this list are young.
  • The prominent cow families represented on this list are: Lila Z (24%); Lead Mae (24%); Gypsy Grand (16%) and Laurie Sheik (8%).
  • The heifers’ sires are 48% daughter proven bulls and 52% genomic young sires.
  • The heifers’ dams are 40% with performance of their own and 60% with PA GLPIs only.
  • 96% of the heifers have DGVs higher than their PA GLPI.
  • The most significant fact is that the top 25 heifers on average have DGVs 228 LPI points higher than their PA GLPI. They are what are commonly referred to as high outliers. Most of these heifers have full sisters who are not as high for DGV. Previously, they would have been considered equals.

In future articles, The Bullvine will be bringing forward ideas on the genetic needs of dairy cattle and strategies to use in selecting and breeding.

THE BULLVINE BOTTOM LINE

When deciding to invest in a high genomics heifer, it is important to study both the heifer’s PA GLPI and her DGV. Although 25 may be too small a group to depend on for everything. Nevertheless from this small snapshot we get a clearer picture of the potential that genomics and DGVs provide.  The Bullvine is excited to provide this perspective on an ongoing basis.
The Dairy Breeders No BS Guide to Genomics

 

Not sure what all this hype about genomics is all about?

Want to learn what it is and what it means to your breeding program?

Download this free guide.

 

 

 

Old school breeder pissing on genomics!!!!

Recently as part of our weekend humor series we published the picture seen at the right.  In publishing the image we knew we would get a reaction, but we were surprised at the way breeders interpreted it.  While we intended to show how old school breeders are dissing on genomics, but instead it seemed to become a rallying cry for old school dairy breeders.

The conversation that has stemmed from it has been very interesting.   As you can see, there are still many breeders who don’t totally understand the merits of using top genomic young sires.  In an effort to help educate, or maybe just bang my head against the wall, we have prepared the following details. .

Proven vs. Young Sire – Who wins in the long run?

Let’s take a comparison of the top 10 Genomics Young Sires vs. the Top 10 Proven sires from the April 2012 proof run.  Of course we all know that the genomic young sires will have higher breeding values, but we need to account for the expected drop.  Our analysis of the NAAB genomic sires’ proofs vs. their later daughter proven proofs currently shows a 13.8% drop on TPI.  (Note: we are actually tracking the drop on LPI sires, TPI sires and PLI sires, and so far we see them dropping 9.7%, 13.8%, and 13.5% respectively.)

The following table shows where the current top genomic sires would rank compared to the proven sires options available currently.

[csv2table source=”http://www.thebullvine.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/PROVENVSGENOMIC.csv” icons=”true”]

What Does This Mean?

What you notice is that three of the top current genomic young sires (Numero Uno, Supersire, and McCutchen) would all rank among the top 10 proven sires.  In fact, 25 of the top 50 sires would be genomic young sires.  This is not to say that they will all drop the 13.8% that the average sire has already.  They could drop more or less.  However, what it does show is that these young genomic sires have a much higher predictability than in the past.  You can now use a group of these young sires with much greater confidence than in the past.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

Are all the top genomic sires, going to end up on the top of the proven sires list, when they have daughter progeny?  No, of course not.  But what we have been finding is that only about 10% of them drop off the top list, and many of them hold pretty strong.  We have even found some genomic sires that actually go up with daughter information.  What it does mean?  Use genomic sires that are within 10% of the top sires.  If they have GTPI values of 2,300 or greater, you will end up ahead of where you would have been, if you had not used any genomic sires at all.  Just remember this is an average.  The movement will not be exactly the same for all sires, hence the need to spread out your young sire usage.

For all those old school breeders, who are pissing on genomics, well what can I say?  I don’t expect to change your mind. However, it is foolish to piss on something that you don’t understand.  Might I recommend that you read our free guide – The Dairy Breeders “No BS” Guide to Genomics.

Also be sure to check out our other fun links on Facebook

The most nevus day in most breeders lives.

The most nevus day in most breeders lives.

Some decisions are just too hard to make....

Some decisions are just too hard to make….

"You been Flushing Long"

“You been Flushing Long”

It's a good thing dairy breeders don't look at woman the way they do dairy cattle!!!

It’s a good thing dairy breeders don’t look at woman the way they do dairy cattle!!!

When you're having a bad day. Just think......

When you’re having a bad day. Just think……

 

Weekly Show and Sale Recap– 7/14/2012

Saturday, July 14th, 2012

Show

  • Cortland Classic Holstein Show
    July 9, 2012 – Cortland, NY
    Judge: Jamie Black, Constable, NY
    Total Head Shown: 116

    • Junior Champion: Co-Vale Fever Camila, 1st summer yearling, Co-Vale Holsteins, Eaton Holsteins & Barclay Phoenix
    • Reserve Junior Champion: Bulrush Goldwyn Kocktail-ET, 1st winter calf, Eaton Holsteins & Co-Vale Holsteins
    • Senior & Grand Champion: Curr-Vale Goldwyn Lady-L, 1st aged cow, Jessica Currie
    • Reserve Senior & Reserve Grand Champion: McGarr-Farms Golden Rose, 1st 4-year-old, Patrick McGarr
    • Premier Breeder & Exhibitor: Mac-Mara Holsteins
  • Washington State Holstein Show
    July 5-6, 2012
    Lynden, WA
    Judge: Brian Behnke, Albany, WI
    Total head: 81

    • Junior Champion: VanDyk-S Trumpet Loretta (Ralma-RH Trumpet-ET), 1st fall yearling, Grace Zylstra
    • Reserve Junior Champion: Goldcrest Braxton Gin (Regancrest S Braxton-ET), 1st fall calf, Goldcrest Farms
    • Intermediate Champion: Goldcrest Dundee Roxy (Regancrest Dundee-ET), 1st junior 3-year-old, Goldcrest Farms
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion: La-Dee Veronicas Sensation (Velvet-View-KJ Sensation), 1st senior 3-year-old, Larry Tjoelker
    • Senior & Grand Champion: Claquato Goldwyn Regina (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st aged cow, Claquato Farms
    • Reserve Senior & Reserve Grand Champion: Markwell-LB Goldwyn Deb (Braedale Goldwyn), 1st 5-year-old, Markwell Holsteins
    • Premier Breeder – VanDyk-S Holsteins
    • Premier Exhibitor – Goldcrest Farms
  • Central Plains Holstein Show/South Dakota State Show
    July 7, 2012
    Brookings, SD
    Judge: Justin Burdette,  Mercersburg, PA
    107 total head

    • Junior Champion, S.D. State Show and Central Plains Show: Vanderham Cont Sake-Red (Patience Showline Contender), 1st summer yearling, Vanderham Dairy, Alcester, SD
    • Reserve Junior Champion, S.D. State Show and Central Plains Show: Al-Shar SDG Embers Alex-ET (Golden-Oaks ST Alexander), 1st fall calf, Al-Shar Holsteins, Groton, SD
    • Intermediate Champion, S.D. State Show and Central Plains Show: Macland Atwood Stacie (Maple-Downs-I GW Atwood-ET), 1st Jr. 2-year-old, Majestic View Genetics, Troy & Darin Zoellner, and Andy Weber, Groton, SD
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion, S.D. State Show and Central Plains Show: Strans-Jen-D Adv Raquel-Red (KHW Kite Advent-Red), 1st Sr. 2-year-old, Honslo, Birkholz, T., J., & J. Stoutjesdyk, Alcester, SD
    • Senior & Grand Champion, S.D. State Show and Central Plains Show: Jen-D Talent Reanna-Red (Ladino Park Talent), 1st Aged Cow, RSC-CH Holsteins, Alcester, SD
    • Reserve Senior & Reserve Grand Champion, S.D. State Show and Central Plains Show: Sipka PG A Spool 1061-ET (EK-Oseean Aspen-ET), Postlane Holsteins, Volga, SD
    • Premier Breeder Central Plains and SD Holstein Show: Sipka Holsteins, Volga, SD
    • Premier Exhibitor Central Plains: Majestic-View, Troy & Darin Zoellner, Andy Weber, Groton, SD
    • Premier Exhibitor SD State Holstein Show: Al-Shar Holsteins, Groton, SD
  • Emerald Expo
    Patrick and Derrick Frawley were the big winners during the Emerald Expo in Ireland. With Ridgefield Dundee Portea and Croagh Susie Mist 46 (Goldwyn) they captured gold and silver during the individual finale. In addition, they showed the best group of 3 cows. In the milking heifers, Clonpaddin Fames (Sanchez) of Garry Hurley was victorious. (source:holsteininternational.com)

Sale

  • High Rocky-Mountain average
    Mascalese, the Italian Nr.1 bull, has become very popular worldwide in a short period of time. Also in the western part of Canada, where a first choice Mascalese heifer calf out of Ms Chassity Cash VG-87 attracted a great top price of C$80,000. Cash, owned by Morsan Farms, is the sought-after Goldwyn daughter of Regancrest Chassity, who was elected HI’s “Global Cow of the Year” in 2011. That great bid was realized at the 2012 edition of the RockyMountain Sale, where 118 lots reached an outstanding average of C$9776. Another top price was paid for Ladinodale Aretha-Red, a red and polled Destry daughter with high genomics. For C$66,000 she went to RockyMountain Holsteins. And then there was the little Shamrock calf with 3157 gLPI from Fleury-Gen Baxter Lisa, that went to Butler, Elite Dairy, Johnson & Widholm for C$50,000. Also the promising Goldwyn daughter and show heifer Hoese Goldwyn Beauty attracted lots of interest. It was Morsan who finally bought her for C$35,500. (source:holsteininternational.com)
  • $15,000 for an Explode
    Many Canadian buyers made their move at the International Markwell Sale in the US state of Washington, which averaged $3439 over 98 lots. The highest price was paid for Markwell Explode Delcie (from the Raven family), who went to the Delcie Syndicate for $15,000. (source:holsteininternational.com)
  • Destry daughter tops Barrel Creek Holsteins Dispersal
    A daughter of Scientific Destry topped the Barrel Creek Holsteins Dispersal, held June 26th in Intercourse, PA.  Barrel-Creek D Olley-Red-ET sold for $3100 to Walter Brooks of Springville, PA.  Olley was fresh last October and due again this coming October to KHW Elm-Park Acme.  Her dam is an 85-point Advent with over 22,000M from the famed Beaujolais-Red family of Pinehurst.  The second dam is Pinehurst Dark Elegance *RC herself, scored 2E-94 with a lifetime production of 166,944M 3.9 6564F 3.1 5238P, and a 7th generation EX over 1100 of fat!  The second high seller of the day at $3000 was Barrel-Creek Talent Casey, a VG-85 Talent daughter due in January to Sanchez.  The dam was an unscored Goldwyn lost after 1st calving, but behind her was the well-known family from Glen-Valley Holsteins including Glen-Valley Win Caprice-ET (3E-93 GMD-DOM) and Blackstar Classy (2E-92 GMD-DOM) who made over 200,000 of lifetime milk.  Promise Haven Farm of Ulster, PA, was the successful buyer.  One hundred fifteen lots averaged $1675 for the Samuel & Lydia King family of Atglen.  The sale was co-managed by Stonehurst Farm and The Cattle Exchange. (source:holsteinworld.com)
  • Top-selling French Detox
    With an impressive price of €29,500 the Red & White BTS-Aeva became top seller at the auction of Bon Temps & Partners in France. Aeva, purchased by Diamond Genetics & Rijnhof Holsteins, is a Detox daughter out of super bull dam KHW-I Aiko Baxter VG-87. The runner up (€18,600) was a Van Gogh daughter from the Dellia family. (source:holsteininternational.com)
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Categories : Show and Sale Recap

Sold! or did she?

Friday, July 13th, 2012

Maybe it because it’s Friday the 13, or maybe it’s because I just like stirring things up, but recently when I was reviewing the sale list from some of the major sales, I found myself asking, “Did she really sell?”

As I look at the buyers list I see that there were many lots that were bought either by sales management or by the close friends of the person selling the animal.  While I understand in some cases, such as Rocky Mountain Holsteins, for example, that the teams putting on the sale are also typical buyers as well, I also notice cases where I see that lots sold to a close friend of the consignor or neighbor of the consignor and I ask myself did she really sell?

It has been my finding in the past that these types of sales, typically, do not result in any form of actual sale.  Ya sure you may see the new name on the pedigree for a little while, but give it about a year or so and that animal is back in the sole ownership of the breeder who was selling that animal.

I can understand that the breeder does not want to let their animal sell for less than they feel they are worth.  However, the question begs to be asked, is she really worth what they think she is?  On the other hand, are they just looking for the marketing aspect of having one of their animals on the top sellers’ list?

Creating a False Market

There is a certain aspect to having your animal appear on the top sellers list at a major sale.  Often time perception is reality.  Therefore, if breeders see family members from a certain family consistently selling well, they assume it’s a very marketable family and then want to get in on that family to cash in on the popularity.  The problem is that popularity never existed and the person buying in never makes any money.  Neither does the original seller really.  Since they have to pay the commission to the original sales management team for the commission on the animal that never really sold.

Don’t believe your own hype

For most dairy breeders, nothing compares to seeing the fruits of your hard work.  You tend to see each as though it was one of your children.  Well not quite, but pretty close.  You have put so much hard work into it that you want to see the reward for all that work.  Many times that comes in one of two ways: awards and/or revenue.  Moreover, while awards are nice, they don’t pay the bills.  Therefore, you do not want to let those animals go for less than you feel your time and effort is worth.

The problem is many breeders start getting a false sense of what their animals are worth.  You see other animals selling for big dollars, and you think, “Hey my heifer is at least as good as that heifer, if not better”.  Since you don’t want to be shortchanged on your sale price you “protect” her by having a friend or neighbor run up the sale price to what you believe is the minimally acceptable price.  The problem is that no one else in the market feels that she is worth that, so all that you have really done is increased the size of the commission check you are going to pay to sales management.

There’s a fix in the works

I cannot tell you the number of times that I could tell you who and at what price an animal would sell for, before the sale even started.  The reason I can’t tell you is because it’s against most terms and conditions of the sale agreement.  Animals being offered at public auction are to be sold in an open and equally available manner.  Often times, high valued animals are going through the sale ring for the marketability and the hype.  Yes, they are being sold to a new buyer, but the deal has already been worked out before the heifer ever enters the sale ring.

Can I say it’s wrong.  Not really, because it is a mutually agreed upon sale price, and if someone else wanted to pay more than that price they could.  The challenge is that this was more of a private treaty sale than a public offering.  However, I guess everyone wins, sales management gets a sale topper, the seller gets the sale price they are looking for, and the buyer pays a price they agreed upon and gets the added promotion on the animal.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

If you are going to sell an animal at public auction, be willing to sell her.  Don’t put her (or in many cases now him) in the sale if you are not willing to sell.  Yes, I understand the marketing aspects, but in the end, you are only hurting yourself and the industry.  Those who have been to enough of these sales know what breeders are actually willing to let their top animal go, and those who only have the animal in the sale for the hype.  Next time you are at one of these top sales, look to see who is bidding on these animals.  Is it the people who buy all the time?  Is it a breeder who you know is looking to add a new cow family?  On the other hand, is it the neighbor or best friend of the person selling the animal?  When the latter is the case, I have made it a point to stop bidding that instant.  No matter what the price.

What has your experience been?  Please share in comments box below.

 

 

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Are You Feeling the Heat?

Thursday, July 12th, 2012

There is no question your cattle are feeling the heat and, as a result, so is your pocket book. One of the greatest challenges facing many dairy farmers, especially those in the southeastern United States is the effects of heat-stress on their cattle.  The loss in production during the hot summer months can have a huge effect on profitability.  The following are some ways you can improve the performance of your herd, during the hot summer months.

Environment

Three things send your profits spiraling down: increasing air temperature, temperature-humidity index and rising rectal temperature above critical thresholds.  These three can cause decreased dry matter intake (DMI) and milk yield and reduce efficiency of milk yield.  In other words, as temperatures go up your profits go down.  Fortunately, modifications including shade, barns which enhance passive ventilation and the addition of fans and sprinklers help to increase body heat loss, lower body temperature and, thus, increase DMI.

  • Shading
    One of the first steps that should be taken to moderate the stressful effects of a hot climate is to protect the cow from direct and indirect solar radiation.  Get them out of direct sun!  It was estimated that total heat load could be reduced from 30 to 50% with a well-designed shade. Shading is one of the more easily implemented and economical methods to minimize heat from solar radiation.  Cows in a shaded versus no shade environment had lower rectal temperatures (38.9 and 39.4°C) and reduced respiratory rate (54 and 82 breaths/min), and yielded 10% more milk when shaded. Numerous types of shading are available, from trees (which are easily killed by high cow density), to metal and synthetic materials (shade cloth).
  • Cooling for Dairy Cows
    Although shade reduces heat accumulation from solar radiation there is no effect on air temperature or relative humidity and additional cooling is necessary for lactating dairy cows in a hot, humid climate. A number of cooling options exist for lactating dairy cows based on combinations of convection, conduction, radiation, and evaporation. Air movement (fans), wetting the cow, evaporation to cool the air, and shade to minimize transfer of solar radiation are used to enhance heat dissipation. Any cooling system that is to be effective must take into consideration the intense solar radiation, high ambient temperature, and the typically high daytime relative humidity, which increases to almost saturation at night. These challenging conditions tax the ability of any cooling system to maintain a normal body temperature for the cow.  Most air conditioning systems tend to be cost prohibitive and most misting systems tend to increase (not decrease) the relative humidity and can cause large amounts of wasted water that must be dealt with.  Now you’ve got heat and water, two things pathogens love.
  • Cooling Dry Cows
    While many producers tend to focus on lactating cows, it is important not to forget about your dry cows as well.  In a research study, when cows shaded during the dry period were compared with unshaded control animals.  The shaded cows delivered calves that were 3.1 kg heavier and yielded 13.6% more milk for a 305 d lactation, even though all cows were handled similarly following calving.  The shaded cows had lower rectal temperature, respiratory rate, and heart rate and altered hormone patterns during the dry period. Similarly, cows that were cooled using sprinklers and fans during the dry period maintained lower body temperatures and delivered calves that were 2.6 kg heavier and cows averaged 3.5 kg more milk daily for the first 150 d of lactation than shade only controls.
  • Heat Stress Effects On Heifers
    Heifers generate far less metabolic heat than cows, have greater surface area relative to internal body mass and would be expected to suffer less from heat stress. However, research from the southern United States and Caribbean regions indicates that Holstein females raised at latitudes less than 34°N weighed 6 to 10% less at birth and average approximately 16% lower BW at maturity than those in more northern latitudes, even when sired by the same bulls. Immunity may also be compromised in newborns during hot weather, and calves born in February and March. Calves born to heat-stressed dams were less vigorous, less likely to nurse immediately after birth, and consequently the colostrum from the first milking was of higher quality due to little or no nursing. Hot conditions may also compromise the ability of the calf to absorb immunoglobulins. (For more on this check out 10 Ways Cool Calves Beat the Heat)

Genetic Selection

There are many aspects of genetics that influence the response to heat stress, and variation among breeds is large. One of the challenges associated with managing high producing cattle in a hot environment is that selection for increased performance is often in conflict with maintaining homeothermy. The maintenance of body temperature is heritable through characteristics including sweating competence, low tissue resistance, coat structure and color.  Selection for heat tolerance without selection for an accompanied greater productivity would likely result in lower overall performance by the animal. Sweating response was found to be negatively correlated with metabolic rate, suggesting the difficulty in combining desirable traits of heat adaptation and metabolic potential in cattle.

Because genetic variation exists for traits important to thermoregulation, the potential to select sires that can transmit important traits must be considered. Genetic selection for heat tolerance may be possible, but continued selection for greater performance in the absence of consideration for heat tolerance will result in greater susceptibility to heat stress.

Nutritional Management

There is no question that during the hot summer months you need to change what you are feeding your cattle. With reduced dry matter intake you must reformulate your rations to account for the greater nutrient requirements during the hot weather.

Intake of DM usually declines with hot weather and nutrient density of the diet must increase. The tendency is to increase dietary protein concentration above requirements, but there is an energetic cost associated with feeding excess protein. The most limiting nutrient for lactating dairy cows during summer is usually energy intake and a common approach to increase energy density is to reduce forage and increase concentrate content of the ration. The logic is that less fiber (less bulk) will encourage intake, while more concentrates increase the energy density of the diet. High fiber diets may indeed increase heat production, demonstrated by work showing that for diets containing 100, 75, or 50% of alfalfa, with the remainder being corn and soybean meal, efficiency of conversion of ME to milk was 54, 61, and 65%, respectively. While heat increment is a consideration for high fiber diets, total intake has a much greater impact on metabolic heat production by the animal. During hot weather, declining DMI and high lactation demand requires increased dietary mineral concentration. However, alterations in mineral metabolism also affect the electrolyte status of the cow during hot weather.

Water is arguably the most important nutrient for the dairy cow. Water intake is closely related to DMI and milk yield, but minimum temperature was the second variable to enter a stepwise regression equation (after DMI), indicating the influence that ambient temperature exerts on water consumption.  Clean ambient water must be easily available to animals at all times.

The nutritional needs of the cow change during heat stress, and ration reformulation to account for decreased DMI, the need to increase nutrient density, changing nutrient requirements, avoiding nutrient excesses and maintenance of normal rumen function is necessary.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

Extended periods of high ambient temperature coupled with high relative humidity compromise the ability of the lactating dairy cow to dissipate excess body heat. Cows with elevated body temperature exhibit lower DMI and milk yield and produce milk with lower efficiency, reducing profitability for dairy farms in hot, humid climates. Maintaining cow performance in hot, humid climatic conditions in the future will likely require improved cooling capability, continued advances in nutritional formulation, and the need for genetic advancement which includes selection for heat tolerance or the identification of genetic traits which enhance heat tolerance. If producers must focus their efforts, during times of heat stress, then they should focus on those cows that are three weeks before and six weeks after calving.

For more on this check out “Effects of Heat-Stress on Production in Dairy Cattle” from the Journal of Dairy Science

Is the glass half-full or half empty?  The comment is often heard that genomics has yet to prove itself.   When index breeding for production traits came on the scene forty years ago, it too was seen as the new kid on the block.  In response,  The Bullvine has decided to compile a list of points could be considered significant dollar opportunities  Please note that these dollar values are derived from the Canadian situation but the general principles can be applied elsewhere.

Sample Only the Best Young Sires

Eliminating the need to sample the bottom 60% of 550 young sires (all breeds) will save the Canadian industry $16.5 M per year.  Add to that, eliminating the loss that producers bear when they must cull daughters of low genetic merit young sires and it is over $20M in savings by genomically testing all young sires and only sampling the top sires.

Turning Generations

Generation interval is extremely important in determining the rate of genetic advancement in a population of food producing livestock.  Shortening the generation interval, by using genomics to more accurately identify the top heifers and young bulls, will decrease the generation interval by one year, when 30% of the population is bred to young genomically tested young sires. That will increase the rate of genetic advancement by 25% per year.  However the rate of usage of genomically tested young sires is fast approaching 50% which equates to a reduction in generation interval of two years. This results in a 60% gain in genetic advancement.  Research has shown that that 60% gain is worth $30M annually for the traits that are currently included in the LPI formula.

Increased Accuracy

When considering the accuracy, with which we know the breeding values of the animal in a population, there are many points to consider:

  • Conducting a low density panel test on all heifer calves in a population of cows has a cost. It also has the benefit of having a totally accurate herdbook, no wrong assignments of parents and these help in genetic evaluations.
  • Knowing the genomic values for all females means that those genetic merit females can be used as recipients or can be fattened and sold for meat.

Identifying the elite females in a population greatly enhances the rewards that can be reaped from using only the best as dams of the next generation. Putting a dollar value on increased accuracy on the female side of a population is not easy to do but by The Bullvine’s calculation it would yield $20M per year in net terms for Canada’s dairy farmers.

Beyond Canada there are great populations of dairy cattle that contribute to the advancement of the genetic merit of dairy cattle everywhere.  Knowing the genomic values of these animals will greatly help North America advance their populations, especially for breeds with numerically smaller numbers.

Traits under Selection

As The Bullvine has reported (read Is Your Breeding Strategy a Field of Dreams) selecting for traits beyond milk, fat, protein, SCC and conformation will become possible with the use of genomics.  Already The Bullvine has learned from our followers that they look forward to knowing in genetic terms details for feed efficiency, production limiting disease resistance, calf health and liveability, reproduction traits and more.  Putting an industry dollar value on knowing the growth of those additional traits is not possible at this time.  But it will be quite a significant number.

Inbreeding

This article will not spend time addressing inbreeding as it has been addressed previously in The Bullvine (read Inbreeding: Does Genomics Affect The Balancing Act).  Suffice to say at this time inbreeding can be handled when selection uses genomic values.  Not previously mentioned by the Bullvine on inbreeding is the fact that in dairy cattle populations beyond Holsteins there is considerable benefit to using genomics to select semen and embryos from outside a country’s borders.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

So far in this article, The Bullvine has been able to identify over $70M to $100M in annual benefit to Canadian dairy breeders alone from the use of genomics.  That means $10,000 annually for each and every breeder.  So is the glass half full or half empty when it comes to using genomics? How do you see it?
The Dairy Breeders No BS Guide to Genomics

 

Not sure what all this hype about genomics is all about?

Want to learn what it is and what it means to your breeding program?

Download this free guide.

 

 

 

It’s our pleasure to welcome Murray Hunt to the Bullvine Team. Murray brings a wealth of experience from both the dairy industry side as well as the breeder sides of the fence. Ask Murray what success is in the dairy industry and he will instantly flash a smile because he has seen it up close and from both sides of the fence. The family farm, which is approaching its 100th Anniversary, is where he first fell in love with dairying, first at the heels of his grandfather Allen Humphrey and then working with his parents Sterling and Irene Hunt.  Almost three decades with Holstein Canada and the Canadian Association of animal breeders never separated him from his hands on appreciation of cattle at Huntsdale Holsteins.

He Loves Those Cows

“There’s an advantage to spending your working career doing what is closest to your heart.” Murray reports.  As he warms to the topic he enthuses that “Look at the major advancements we have seen in milk production and conformation, especially udders in Holstein cattle.  They were known for deep udders and low butterfat. They’ve certainly come a long way.” Years of working with the Holstein Canada Classification program support his conclusions. “And there is still great potential in working on feet.”  Justifiably proud of the Master Breeder shield earned by Huntsdale, Murray continues to breed to send sires into A.I. both in Canada and one in abroad. “Developing a member of the Gypsy Grand cow family has been good for Huntsdale.”

Cow Sense Meets Cow Science

Murray earned both his B.Sc. and M.Sc. at Guelph University.  His Master’s thesis was entitled, “An A.I. Breeding Schemes” and included the “Dollar Difference Guide” which was the precursor to the Canadian LPI system.  Hunt’s Masters was implemented by A.I. organizations that went from sampling less than 50 bulls per year to over 400.

(Not) The Same Old Story

Despite his long history with farming and farmer organizations, he is not reluctant to move forward.  “Success can be directly linked to your willingness to change.” Says Murray even though he adds, “All change is not good but we have to research the possibilities and then select what appears to be the best move in a forward direction.” If he himself was stuck in the past, he might be unwilling to see genomics moving the industry away from a purely pedigree analysis of animals.  “On the contrary!” he exclaims, “It’s wonderful to move to the next stage where we don’t have the cost and delays of proving sires that don’t have a chance of coming through as plus sires!” This leads to the topic of organizations and Hunt firmly believes that the future of the cattle breeding industry will see fewer producer organizations. “This is predictable from a purely financial point of view and will evolve with the breeder priorities, provided we can move beyond the past, be objective and expand our vision for the future.”

Look to the Horizon

“We need to forge our path to the horizon and not just to the end of our own laneway!” insists Murray who notes that “The ones who move forward with change are the ones who stay with the (cattle) industry and those who don’t will exit the industry.” He is not upset about this but does add, “Every generation that survives on the farm moves ahead with technology. It could be in your fully equipped office or the method you use for milking. For some it’s new ways to grow crops and mechanized ways to feed them.”  He strongly feels that it is “up to dairy breeders and industry leaders to trust the system, improve the system and use the system to produce a continually better product.”

The Bullvine Bottom Line

For Murray Hunt there is no final one-size-fits-all answer.  “If it was that easy, there would be no challenge and no opportunity. We all want to use what we know to prove our faith in the potential of Holstein cattle.  These are exciting times for genetics, technology and the future of the dairy business. It’s no time to find yourself sitting on the fence!”

Join us in welcoming Murray to the Bullvine team and we are excited about the great insights he will bring to the Bullvine.

As I watch how the dairy industry has changed over the recent years, and more specifically the dairy breeding industry, I find myself asking the question “is the tail wagging the dog?” Specifically I want to know, “Are dairy breeders dictating to A.I. companies what bulls they want to use and what trait they are looking for, or, is it the other way around?

So much has been made of how genomics has changed the dairy breeding industry lately, and yet, it still seems as though the large A.I. companies are trying to tell dairy breeders what they should be interested in, instead of dairy breeders, who know their own needs, telling the A.I. companies what’s important to them.

In any marketplace it should always be the consumer dictating to the producer what’s important. For the dairy industry that means that “Joe public” should dictate what’s important. Do they want hormone free milk, do they want milk that is from non-genetically manipulated animals. All this should be and, ultimately, will be determined by the end consumer.

Then as the milk producer, based on your own goals or strategy to deliver a product that is of high value to the end consumer you manage your herd appropriately. That means selecting of sires and genetics that will help you satisfy “Joe public.” Too often, I find that A.I. companies are caught up in themselves. They either have a new hot sire that they want to push, or they have developed what they think is a “distinct” differentiation from the other A.I. companies and want you to buy into that.

Your breeding program should not be dictated to you by who the popular sire of the moment is or what is the cheapest semen you can get. Dairy cattle breeding is not a popularity contest. It is something you should put time into and carefully consider based on your overall farm/herd goals and where you’re genetic programs fit into that. You can then decide what traits are important to you and what sires will help you achieve the desired results. As a progressive dairy breeder you need to be in charge of your genetic programs, not the local semen salesmen who get their marching orders from someone who does not know your specific needs and goals.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

The biggest thing I have learned in my years working with various large corporate entities is that it all starts with the end consumer. Look for what they want and work your way back. For dairy breeders who want to be market leaders, that means looking at milk consumption. What trends are happening there, what trends are going on in animal welfare? By looking ahead instead of behind you will not only not be caught in the latest fad, but rather you will see the rewards in your pocket book.

 

For more information check out The Bullvine Bull Book or our Genetic Evaluation Resource Center.

 

Weekly Show and Sale Recap– 7/7/2012

Saturday, July 7th, 2012

Sale

  • RockyMountain High Averages $9,776!
    July 5, 2012 was an exciting day at RockyMountain Holsteins as they hosted the fifth RockyMountain High Sale.  A great line-up of show type, and high genomic numbers paraded through the ring to achieve an average of $9,776 on 118 live lots. (source:holsteinworld.com)

    • Topping the sale was Lot 1 for $80,000, 1st choice Mascalese from eight females out of Chassity Goldwyn Cash VG-87-2YR-CAN GTPI +2275, the Goldwyn daughter of Regancrest S Chassity EX-92 DOM.  The choice sold to Canadian Logistics.
    • Second highest was Lot 43 at $66,000- Ladinodale Aretha-Red, a 3/11 Destry out of Ladinodale Amanda-Red VG-86 *PO, RockyMountain Holsteins, buyer.
    • Third high seller at $50,000 was Lot 13-RockyMountain Srock Lilli GTPI +2497 GLPI +3157 DGV +3415, she’s a Shamrock daughter of Fleury Gen Baxter Lisa VG-87 x Lisamaree VG-89 then Lila Z and she sold to Jeff Butler, Elite Dairy Genomics, Todd Widholm and Larry Johnson.
  • International Revue Markwell Global Edition Averages $3,439
    A cloudy, rainy day didn’t deter a big crowd from attending the International Revue Markwell Global Edition on Tuesday, July 3rd. The sale received great support from neighbors north of the border and when everything was totalled up, 98 live lots averaged $3,439. (source:holsteinworld.com)

    • High seller was Lot 11 at $15,000 – Markwell Explode Delcie-ET, a 4/11 Explode at +2206 GTPI out of Seagull-Bay Gold Daisy-ET VG-87 DOM, then A-L-H Donatella VG-86 DOM back to EX-95 Raven. She was purchased by the Delcie Syndicate, WA.
    • Markwell Shamrock Mikasa-ET, a stylish 10/11 Shamrock at +2247 GTPI out of Markwell Goldwyn Medina EX-92 sold for $12,700, good for 2nd high. She also hails from the Raven family and her dam has several sons in AI. Hyljon Holsteins of Chilliwack, BC made the final bid on Mikasa.
  • Holland Master Sale
    Lots of excitement during the Holland Master Sale at Zwolle (Netherlands): a high sale average of €15,990 over 42 lots; and a top price of no less €101,000 for a first choice Numero Uno out of the highest gTPI cow in Europe, the Italian Muri Planet Popsy . Buyers were Cormdale, Diamond, and Eclipse. For €65,000, Bouw Shamrock Lizette will travel to Whalley & Cottonabbots in Great Britain, while at €55,000 Cormdale & Al-Be-Ro became the new owners of a polled Colt P. (Source: holsteininternational.com)
  • US National Convention Sale
    An Epic daughter (2490 gTPI) of Cookiecutter MOM Halo at  $76,000 topped the National Convention Sale in the US, where 81 lots averaged $12,825. The amount of $52,000 was paid for a polled Man-O-Man calf as well as for a Facebook out of a Planet daughter of Larcrest Crimson. (Source: holsteininternational.com)
  • Futures Sale
    One day earlier, the National Convention Futures Sale reached an average of $11,169 with 27 lots sold. Here the top price, paid for a McCutchen out of an Observer daughter of Roorda Shottle 6802, was $37,000. A first choice Numero Uno from  Ensenada Alan Petty changed hands for $22,000. (Source: holsteininternational.com)
  • Northwest Dairy Showcase Sale Averages $2,416
    The Northwest Dairy Showcase Sale, sponsored by the Whatcom County Holstein and Jersey clubs, took place on Thursday evening, July 5th and averaged $2,416 on 28 live Holsteins and Jerseys. Five embryo lots averaged $385 per embryo.

    • Topping the sale at $5,500 was Lot 1 – Westcoast Windbrook Amalee, a 12/11 Windbrook heifer out of Butz-Butler Durham Amy-ET EX-93-CAN, then EX-96 2E Angel and EX-96 2E Ashlyn. Amalee leaves her Westcoast home headed to the LaFollette Holstein herd of John & Joan Judd in Wisconsin.
    • High selling Jersey at $2,800 was Lot 25 – Rocha MVP Genna, a 2-year-old MVP daughter fresh in April out of an EX-92 Chairman dam. Consigned by Cris & Doris Rocha of Tillamook, OR, Genna was purchased by Jerald Visser of Sumas, WA.
  • US Jersey National Heifer Sale Sets Records
    July 2, 2012
    Fryeburg, Maine
    Unofficial Average $4,700 – the All-Time Record Average for the Heifer Sale!

    • Lot 1 – $27,100 – Buttercrest Impress Satin-ET, +244 GJPI calf with a great amount of bull stud interest – a new record seller for the National Heifer Sale! Consigned by Cooperrider & Sons, Croton, Ohio  Buyer: River Valley Dairy, Tremont, Illinois.
    • $10,100 – Lot 6 – A heifer who is currently + 247 GJPI and has interest from several bull studs. Consignor: Michael Ooms, NY Buyer: Sexing Technologies, TX.

Show

  • All-Holland Show
    During the All-Holland Dairy Show (NRM), the General Championship of the Holsteins was won by Shottle daughter Jimm Holstein Hellen 589, of John de Vries. Other champion banners went to Sanchez daughter Willem’s Hoeve Rita 579 of De Jong, and Allen daughter Tellingen Esmeralda 27 of Krikken. In the Red Holsteins, the final victory went to Brook Marie 61, a Classic daughter of Hans Puttenstein. Barendonk Brasilera 12 (by Classic), of Barendonk, and OV Nueva (by Sputnic) of Nieuwenhuis were the other winners. (Source: holsteininternational.com)
  • Young Champion
    In Luxemburg, the 1st calver Jasper daughter Fini, owned by André and René Laugs, has won the National Show. However, that was not their only success. Also the overwhelming champion of the senior class, the pitch-black Roy daughter Uroyble, was paraded around the ring by Laugs. The intermediate class was won by Goldwyn daughter HTH Lara Goldwin, of Zuchtbetrieb Holsthein – Thein & Elsen. (Source: holsteininternational.com)
  • Washington State Jersey Show
    July 5, 2012
    Lynden, WA
    Judge: Brian Behnke, WI

    • Junior Champion of the Junior Show – Avonlea Comerica Rhianna (Comerica), Lauryn Young & Mia Berry, WA
    • Reserve Junior Champion of the Junior Show – Royalty Ridge HG Felicity-ET (Hired Gun), Lauryn Young, WA
  • Royal Highland Ayrshire Show Results
    June 21-24, 2012

    • Junior Champion – Cuthill Towers Zola 12 (Potter), A & S Lawrie
    • Reserve Junior Champion – Knowe White Kate 171 (Easlad), G & G Templeton
    • Champion – Halmyre Urr Floralin 144 (Inimitable), K Davidson
    • Reserve Champion – Cuthill Towers Zola 12 (Potter), A & S Lawrie
  • Expo Rive-Nord Holstein Show Results
    June 30, 2012
    Judge: Réjean Leclerc
    77 Head

    • Junior Champion – Stepido Baltimor Bailey (Baltimor), 1st Intermediate Yearling, Ferme Syma Holstein Enrg, Ferme Godin enr et Steve Godin, QC
    • Reserve Junior Champion – Vieuxsaule Seaver Calina (Seaver), 1st Summer Yearling, Ferme du Vieux Saule, QC
    • HM Junior Champion – Rietben B Sassy (Braxton), 1st Intermediate Calf, Ferme Drouin & fils, QC
    • Grand Champion – Roggua Dundee Evelyne (Dundee), 1st 4 Year OldFerme Yvon Sicard et Ghislain Demers, QC
    • Reserve  Grand Champion – Shadypoplar Rochester Patsy (Rochester), 2nd 4 Year Old, Ferme Syma Holstein Enrg, QC
    • HM Grand Champion – Penlow Jennifer Goldwyn (Goldwyn), 1st Sr. 2 Yr. Old, Ferme Pinstar Holstein inc, QC
    • Premier Breeder – Vieuxsaule, QC
    • Premier Exhibitor – Ferme Drouin & fils, QC
  • Central New York Holstein Show
    July 5, 2012
    Norwich, NY
    Judge: Callum McKinven
    143 Head

    • Junior Champion – Junior Show – Midas-Touch Atlanta Mist – 2nd Winter Calf, Cooper Galton
    • Reserve Junior Champion – Junior Show – Maple Downs CC DU Ameilia – 1st Fall Yearling, Emily Tillspaugh
    • Junior Champion – Open Show – SBW-FC San Fernando – Winter Calf, Woodcrest & Kevin and Barb Ziemba
    • Reserve Junior Champion – Open Show – Woodcrest Goldwyn Agella – Fall Calf, Hannah Braum
    • Junior Best Group of 3
      • Headline Farm
      • Ovaltop Holsteins
      • Roll-N-View
    • Intermediate Champion – Junior Show – Macland Atwood Juliet – 2nd Junior 2 yr old, Emilie Mulligan
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion – Junior Show – Genesee-Hill Ross Cleo – 8th Junior 2 yr old, Claire Mulligan
    • Intermediate Champion – Open Show – George Farm Jasper Ebita – 1st Senior 3 yr old, George Farm
    • Reserve Intermediate Champion – Open Show – Mac-Mara Velvet Jester – 2nd Senior 3 yr old, Mac-Mara Holsteins
    • Senior & Grand Champion – Junior Show – Curr-Vale Goldwyn Lady-L –1st Milking Aged Cow – Jessica Currie
    • Reserve Senior & Res. Grand Champion – Junior Show – Ridgedale Folly – 1st 125,00lb Cow, Cyrus Conrad
    • Senior & Grand Champion – Open Show – Curr-Vale Goldwyn Lady-L – Milking Aged Cow – Jessica Currie
    • Reserve Senior & Reserve Grand Champion – Open Show – Silbert Goldwyn Stacy – 4 year old, Woodcrest & Kevin and Barb Ziemba
    • Senior Best Group of 3
      •  Curr-Vale
      • Mac-Mara
      • Ovaltop
    • Premier Breeder – Junior Show – Nicole Head
    • Premier Exhibitor – Junior Show – Cyrus Conrad
    • Premier Breeder – Open Show – Curr-Vale Holsteins
    • Premier Exhibitor – Open Show – Woodcrest and Kevin & Barb Ziemba
  • Royal Highland Jersey Show Results
    June 21-24, 2012

    • Junior Champion- Enchanted Iatola Ariel (Iatola), J & I Wilson
    • Reserve Junior Champion – Potterswalls Minister Glamour (Minister), Miss Karen Hunter
    • Champion Jersey – Clydevalley Governor Flora (Governor), Mr Robert Hunter
    • Reserve Champion – Enchanted Iatola Ariel (Iatola), J & I Wilson
  • Three Counties Jersey Show Results
    June 15-17, 2012

    • Champion – Jubilee Signature Ceres (Signature), Normead House, Winterbourne Monkton
    • Reserve – Shellon Connection Diamond (Connection), S & S Murray Farms Ltd., Shipley Bank Farm
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Categories : Show and Sale Recap

Yesterday as I watched online the Rocky Mountain High sale that averaged a strong $9776, this year hosted by Rocky Mountain Holsteins and I found myself missing being there very much.  Not because there were some great cattle selling, which there was, and not because there were some great buys to be had, which there were, but rather because of the showmanship and the western hospitality.

I can still remember when my brother first went to work for Alta Genetics and had the amazing opportunity to work with Dr. David Chalack and the AltaGen program.  One of the key responsibilities he had was working on the annual sale to be held each summer in conjunction with the Calgary Stampede, which has now morphed into the Rocky Mountain High sales series.

It was there that I learned there is nothing really like western hospitality, or the show that Dr. David and the team put on.  From the line dancers dancing to the John Michael Montgomery song “sold” that opened the sale to the shootout in the middle of the sale to make sure that everyone is still alert, they really made things memorable.

It was also at that sale that we really started getting into purchasing top index cattle.  My mother and I had been given a budget of $10,000 to purchase that would be the foundation of our breeding program.  After much homework and careful consideration we purchased Summershade Icemarti, a Ricecrest Marty (thanks Ron) from the then #1 LPI cow Summershade Icebreak Luke for the ripe sum of $11,000.

Then the whole western hospitality combined with auction fever hit and we kept purchasing more.  We purchased AltaGen Mattie Jenni, Altagen Marty Shari and 2 other animals.  And it was a good thing we did.  Icemarti, did not score VG as a 2yr old, a kiss of death at that time, and she was not a prolific flusher.  So the ROI on her was not very good.  However, Mattie Jennie did score VG as a 2yr old and that combined with a show heifer we purchased at the sale from Willswick did at least manage to salvage the trip.  It was also there that we learned that you either go big or go home, and lead to us purchasing Rietben Con Carmel, a Convincer out of the now EX Rudolph sister to Freelance and Goodluck at the Royal Sale of Stars that year, who would become a top index and foundation cow for our breeding program.

For many breeders a trip to the Rocky Mountain High series sales is a highlight of their summer.  They get to see great cattle, a great show and have a great time.  With Dr. David’s strong involvement in the Calgary stampede you can bank on having a great time.

The Rocky Mountain Holsteins team, and more recently with the Morsan involvement, the RMH series of sales, has proven to have some of the best cattle in the world to offer.  It has become a mainstay on the top list of sales each year, and is always presented with no expense spared.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

I almost shed a tear watching how things are changing.  My brother is now moving to The Netherlands to be closer to the corporate executive team, my “farm” is in Vaughan Ontario and I ask myself if I will be able to make future sales.  My answer is, “Hell yes!”  The west will continue to win my heart with the great cattle sale and hold it with the rodeo, races and hospitality!

 

 

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When you look at the top 10 GTPI heifers you see that 9 of them are from heifers themselves with only one coming from a scored and milk producing dam.  In addition 9 of them are from one sire (Shamrock), which instead of widening the genetic pool is actually shrinking it.  Looking at the top GLPI list reveals that three out of every four in the top 100 are from un-calved heifers.  While, on paper, cutting the genetic interval makes sense (read The Genomic Advancement Race – The Battle for Genetic Supremacy), long term, have breeders and AI companies started to take it too far?

In the new genomic world the previous gold standard of a proven sire stack and string of VG+ is no longer required.  In any given pedigree you can now find GP cattle (read Is Good Plus Good Enough) or sires that you never have heard of.

Does Classification Even Matter?

While GP-84-2YR used to be the kiss of death for many marketing and genetic programs, genomics has changed the game.  With genomics, we are seeing many GP 83 or 84 cows used as dams that would have never been touched before.  While many will increase in score later in life, others do not, and yet that does not seem to be as big a factor.  Many A.I. companies and breeders are more concerned about their genomic values than that of the actual classification scores.

There could be many reasons why that potential bull mother did not score very good.  It could be management, it could be an accident that happened.  Also, it could be that she is just not that good.  It brings into question the relevance of classification.  While the index system relies on having a large data set in order to map the genomes to the potential performance of each trait, it has me thinking do we need to score cattle anymore or can we just use their genomic values?  Then I snap back to reality and realize that it’s one thing to look good on paper and another to deliver in reality.

Have We Forgotten Sire stack?

At one time, if there was a non -known sire in the pedigree, A.I. would not touch it.  The marketability of that pedigree was next to nothing.  No matter what the classification score was, or what the family was behind that animal, sire stack carried significant weight.  Now I find myself having to do as much homework on the sire of the new top young sires, as I do on the young sires themselves.  That may be because most of them are still young sires themselves.  However, it is also because a young sire that did not turn out can still sometimes be better than a previous Top 10 proven sire.

For example, let’s say the proven sire has a TPI of 2300 at the time of mating and the young sire being used as sire of sons has a TPI of 2900.  By the time the resulting progeny is being sampled the proven sire may have a TPI of 1750, and the young sire that was being used as a sire of sons may have a TPI of 1850.  While that young sire may not be a list topper anymore, he is still higher than the proven sire that could have been used at the time.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

The dairy cattle industry has seen more change in the selection of parents in the past four years than at in any other period in its history.  Genomics has changed the name of the game, and while many breeders have been apprehensive in embracing it, others have taken it and are running full force.  I would not be surprised to see more significance in the future put on Direct Genomic Values (DGV’s) than on the weighted GLPI or GTPI.  With everything that is new, there is a learning curve and, as we discover how to use this tool better, I am sure we will find better ways to apply the information.  However, there is no question that genomics is here to stay and it is greatly changing the rate of genetic gain.

 
The Dairy Breeders No BS Guide to Genomics

 

Not sure what all this hype about genomics is all about?

Want to learn what it is and what it means to your breeding program?

Download this free guide.

 

 

 

Summer is not the time to skimp on promoting your herd for potential income. If anything, you should advertise even more now. Start with free and easy sources and build awareness of what you have to offer. The following are 11 tips to help you.

  • Word-of-Mouth Turns up the Volume
    Experts say that word-of-mouth is 10 times more effective than other marketing tools such as advertising, special events, and direct mail. Always, always, always keep friends, family, neighbors, and others up to speed on what you have to offer in the marketplace. Are you putting up new facilities? Are family members winning on the show circuit? Have you raised your production levels? Is your farm winning production awards? Are you promoting bio-security or green protocols? Give people something to talk about. Better yet share it on Facebook and let it go viral.
  • Signs
    Every person who sets foot on your property as friend, acquaintance, business supplier or animal handler, should be able to see a sign with each animal letting them know who it is and why they are special. Think about it. If you are starting into genomics, polled cattle or red genetics, make sure that you have a sign saying so. Everyone associated with you should be able to answer the question, “Who’s selling polled Holsteins these days?” or whatever variation of the market you are targeting. Set up the appropriate signs and update frequently.
  • Go Beyond Magazine Ads
    There’s a very true saying that goes something like this, “If you can afford to advertise, you don’t need to.” Old fashioned ads in breed magazines can set you back $1000 to $3000 for each package. They reach a specific demographic and, not necessarily, the buyers the movers and shakers who are out there moving cattle around. Furthermore, although a picture is worth a thousand words, today`s big spenders want to get up-close and personal when evaluating their next purchase. Don’t rely on this resource exclusively.
  • Digital Marketing
    The opportunity to grow your business with digital marketing services has never been greater. What is digital marketing? Defined, it is promoting your company or brand by using all forms of digital advertising channels to reach new customers. Remember it’s the new customers that you want to connect with. It can be as simple as email, Facebook, or twitter. Every time your prefix is printed make sure your sales niche is there too! “Huntsdale Farms – Your source for Top Genomic Heifers” for example.
  • Sponsorships
    Increase attention and increase traffic to your dairy business through your association with 4-H, Holstein clubs and other agricultural and conservation groups. This next decade will see huge changes in consumer awareness and demands relating to food production and animal treatment. Reputation starts at home. Make sure that yours is associated with the good animal husbandry and quality products. These are the cornerstones of why you are in dairying in the first place.
  • Be Political
    It`s too late when you read the 2012 Farm Bill or the CDCB proposal after they have been passed and you see that it negatively affects your cattle business. It’s unreasonable to expect any political representative to be 100% aware or even 50% knowledgeable of what our industry is all about. When was the last time this person had any experience directly relating to agriculture? It is time for the farmers to take responsibility for keeping the communication going both ways. An informed government decision (that you have put input into) is better than one that is based on hearsay, pressure groups or political positioning.
  • In the News
    Agricultural is on radio, TV and in news headlines these days. It isn’t always cast in the best light. Make friends with the reporters who cover these topics in your area. If you have expertise in something that is getting headlines don’t keep a low profile and then become frustrated when your side of the story is misrepresented or worse completely inaccurate. Make yourself known to the local, provincial and federal politicians who speak for or against agriculture. It doesn’t cost anything to invite local media or agricultural representatives to your events but how often do farmers assume that they will just show up at that sale, cattle show or open house? And once you’ve extended the invitation, provide a two to six hundred word report on what happened and why it is not only great for agriculture or cattle breeders but for the community as well.
  • An Effective Website
    Nearly 55% of all small businesses have a website, but yet less than 2% of dairy breeders do. Believe it or not, it works for farm businesses too! You don’t need to be fancy with it or pay a lot of money. For a minor investment your website becomes your hardest-working employee, working around the clock daily to promote your farm, cattle and embryos. Your site can work as a super sales tool. 24-7 is the new advertising success code.
  • Be an Expert
    Are you an expert at some aspect of the dairy industry (i.e. polled, genomics, health traits. etc)? Write articles about your expertise with a small link to your website or Facebook page at the end. Are you a cattle judge? Show fitter? Do you provide sale services or buy and sell cattle or embryos globally. Be the media source for your market segment. As a professional service, you can position yourself as the go-to authority. It is all about positioning your prefix, your products and yourself for success.
  • Networking
    Online or offline, networking groups abound. Online, I would suggest joining effective sites like Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, and LinkedIn. Most consumers search the web before making a purchase. Phone books are nearly obsolete. Magazines and newspapers are not 24-7 accessible at the touch of your fingertips. The world is now your marketplace, so you can sell your cattle or their genetics anywhere. This means more money, opportunity, and a more professional image for your farm.
  • Video Marketing
    There is a tremendous opportunity here. Thanks to modern technology, it’s never been easier to make your own video. You probably own several devices which are capable of capturing high quality videos that you can then edit and burn onto DVD or upload to the Internet. This is a very simple process that doesn’t take long to learn. You can highlight cows, heifers, show cattle or embryos. These videos can then be used on the web, at shows and sales.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

These days, dairy producers need to have as much confidence in handling their advertising as they do when handling their high-producing cows.

 

 

To learn how to get your farm on Facebook download this free guide.

 

 

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Over the past year there have been prices in excess of $200,000 dollars paid for high indexing genomic heifers.  For many breeders the changes that have resulted from the higher reliability that genomics provides has prompted them to invest “the farm” when it comes to buying into these potential cash cows.  However, where to invest your money and which animals are worth it and which ones are not can be a very risky proposition.  With that in mind, we compiled the following recommendations

Making the short list

While purchasing the #1 GLPI heifer may provide you with the greatest chance of getting a top cow, it is not a guarantee.  In looking at the top 10 GLPI heifers, you notice an interesting range with most having an LPI of 3200 to 3400 points, but there are some that have GLPI’s of 2300 to 2500.  You don’t have to buy into the very top of the list, but it does make it easier. Similar is true for the GTPI list as well.  Though it’s highly recommended that you purchase a heifer who has DGV’s higher than her parent average.

LYLEHAVEN LILA Z EX-94-CAN 9*

LYLEHAVEN LILA Z EX-94-CAN 9*

There are also cow families that seem to be increase significantly generation after generation.  One such family is the world renowned Lila Z family.  While Lila Z herself is only 1165 GLPI, descendants are currently the #1 GLPI heifer and #1 GLPI bull.  That is because generation after generation in this family seems to come to the top.  This means that you can consider purchasing embryos or heifers from animals that have a GLPI of about 2900+ or 2000 GTPI if it is a family that has proven to produce much higher genomic progeny generation after generation. But be careful don’t assume that they all will.  Check the family history.

AMMON-PEACHEY SHAUNA VG-87-2YR-USA

AMMON-PEACHEY SHAUNA VG-87-2YR-USA

Lesson:  While purchasing at the top provides you with the greatest potential it is worth taking the time to see how your choice stands up generation after generation.  Certain cow families like Lylehaven Lila Z and Ammon-Peachey Shauna seem to consistently put out high genomic descendants.

Never Under Estimate the Power of the Stack

When it comes to providing the greatest reliability for your investment, nothing compares to looking at the sire stack.  One thing I have learned from your tried and true breeders is whether you are breeding for index or show cattle, nothing beats a good sire stack.  Proven sires have a much higher reliability than genetic predictors do.  A heifer’s sire stack is a great way to eliminate the hothouse effect (for more check out it’s in her genes…).

Lesson:  When investing in dairy cattle it can often be buyer beware, a great way to mitigate the risk when purchasing into cow families that you are not familiar with is to look at their sire stack.

Flush History

Nothing can make or break an investment in genomic heifers like a poor flush history.  You will make or break the bank depending on how well they flush.  As the numbers show in What comes first the chicken or the egg?  There really is no comparison when it comes to the most important factor in the profitability of your genetic and embryo programs.  In fact, for each embryo flush where a donor is able to produce over 10 eggs per flush, you will typically see 24% greater return on your investment.  It takes a rare case (1 in a million) to have a cow that flushes less than seven embryos per flush to be a profitable investment.

Lesson: as much as you spend a great deal of time researching the pedigree and looking at your potential purchase’s conformation, there really is nothing more important than her own and her family’s historical flush ability.  Take the time to make sure that the animal you are considering will be able to flush 7+ embryos per time.  If you are not sure they will, or there isn’t an available flush history on the family (strongly maternal) wait.  Look for a new animal.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

With big dollars being spent on top genomic heifers, and even more breeders wanting to get into investing in top genomic heifers, taking the time to do your homework is very important.  Investing in the correct families which have generation after generation of proven genetics can save you future headaches.  Taking the time to make sure that they are able to produce significant numbers of embryos can make you a great deal of money.  (To learn more about his read 6 Ways to Invest $50,000 in Dairy Cattle Genetics). Take the time to consider these factors and you will see the reward for it.

What has your experience been?  Please share in comments box below.

 

 

Not sure how much to spend on that great 2 year old?
Want to make sure you are investing your money wisely?
Download our Dairy Cow Investment Calculator.

 

 

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Categories : Investment Advice

It’s Buyer Beware

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

Recently, I had the opportunity to attend a twitter chat about Dairy Cattle Marketing Ethics.  During the conversation there was a recurring theme of “buyer beware”.  Whether it was about photo enhancement or sales claims, the ultimate message was that buyers should beware of everything they read or see.  The problem is – and I have seen this many times in other industries – “buyer beware” is no way to grow a strong business.

Technology has greatly changed not only marketing, but also the sales of dairy genetics worldwide.  You are no longer selling to the breeder next door, in your state or province, or even in the same country anymore.  Often, you are selling to breeders halfway around the world.  While this opens up huge marketplaces for top genetics, it also creates an opportunity for potential customers to be lead astray.  These breeders do not know the characters of the people selling their genetics, or even if they can trust that the genetics they purchase, there is the question of will it bring the desired results.

It’s About Long Term Relationships

For years I have heard of extremely high prices being paid for mid-level genetics, to markets that were not as educated as the North American market at the time.  Breeders would be more than happy to sell their cattle for twice as much as they would get domestically, and not even worry how things would work out for the breeder buying their cattle.  The thing is, those breeders who lead breeders astray now find themselves in a tough predicament, and those breeders who worked at developing a trusting relationship with these marketplaces have now found themselves in good stead.

Let’s Not Manipulate

One of the areas that seemed to be of unified agreement during the twitter chat was that of photo manipulation.  With no formal organization to regulate how photos are altered, and technology advancing so rapidly, photo abuse has reached insane levels.  To a point where it seems like most breeders no longer trust the pictures of cattle;  it has been said that anyone can get a great shot these days “one way or another.”

During the chat, it came to my mind that if we cannot expose those who are crossing that ethical line (note:  I’m still considering doing a “10 worst photos of all time” article and let the breeders decide who is ethical and who is not).  However, until then, if you cannot operate from the negative, maybe we should operate from the positive.  Maybe we should create a stamp or seal that identifies those images that have not been enhanced in anyway.  Yes, the pictures will not look as glossy or shiny, but they will help build trust, since you know what you see in these images will be what you get when you purchase genetics from these animals/breeders/companies.

The Bullvine Bottom Line

“Buyer beware” is no way to build a long-term business.  While you may make money in the short run, in the long run you will pay the price.  The industry is too small and technology has opened up communications around the world greatly.  The best way to build your marketing and sales strategy is to have your customer be your number one focus.  Work at making them into raving fans of the genetics they purchased and the support you’ve provided them.  While this will take more effort than the quick sale, your long term cash flow will greatly benefit.  Consider this a message of “Seller Beware.”

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